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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Brandon L. Sams and Mike P. Cook

The purpose of this paper is to examine youth literacy and writing practices in select, contemporary young adult literature (YAL), especially how and why literate activity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine youth literacy and writing practices in select, contemporary young adult literature (YAL), especially how and why literate activity is sponsored, negotiated or occluded by teachers and schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors position young adult fiction as case studies of youth composing in and out of school. Drawing on Stake's (1995) features of case study research in education, the authors present readings of Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero and The Vigilante Poets of Selwyn Academy by Kate Hattemer that highlight particular problems and insights about youth literacy practices that are worth extended examination and reflection.

Findings

Both novels feature youth engaging in powerful literacy and writing practices across a range of modes to critically read and write their worlds. These particular texts – and other YAL featuring youth composing – offer teacher educators and pre-service teachers opportunities for critical reflection on their evolving stances on literacy instruction; identities as writing and literacy educators; and pedagogies that enable robust literate activity.

Originality/value

In the US educational context, teacher education programs are required to provide pre-service teachers numerous opportunities to observe and participate as teachers in public school classrooms. YAL offers a unique setting of experience that can be productively paired with more traditional field placements to complement pre-service writing teacher education. Reading YAL featuring youth composing can serve as a useful occasion of reflection on pedagogies that limit and/or make possible students’ meaningful engagement with words and the world.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Brandon L. Sams

This writing is performed with and about disappointment in moments of failed research and teaching. The bulk of this chapter was written some years ago and describes…

Abstract

This writing is performed with and about disappointment in moments of failed research and teaching. The bulk of this chapter was written some years ago and describes, reflects on, and analyzes a self-study inquiry about the phenomenon of pedagogical reading. Having returned to and studied this earlier work, I offer a posthuman postscript that rereads the initial inquiry primarily through the work of Deleuze. Rereading intimate scholarship through a post-human lens decenters the self as knower, writer, and teacher, making possible otherwise ways of imagining reading, writing, and studying together. In my case, posthumanism provides tools for rereading two concepts offered for understanding teaching literature, naked and belated pedagogy. While these concepts were somewhat productive in helping me understand what I was experiencing as a researcher and writer, they reproduce and justify traditional, text-centered teacher identities and practices. They are a product of and themselves reproduce what Deleuze and Guattari (2003) called “arborescent” thinking. Ultimately, naked and belated pedagogies reinforce traditional curriculum practices, sidestep students’ lives, and position the teacher as final authority in matters of curriculum control and interpretation. Disappointment includes those affections and emotions that arise through a posthuman rereading of the research scene – including what I, the researcher and teacher, failed to do, say, think, and teach.

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Brandon L. Gray, Samuel Gaster, Christina Early and Amanda Reed

Healthcare professionals work in high stress environments and may benefit from organizational efforts that enhance coping abilities. Community-based psychological first…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare professionals work in high stress environments and may benefit from organizational efforts that enhance coping abilities. Community-based psychological first aid (CBPFA) is an evidence-informed program designed for building these skills and promoting resilience during stressful times. However, few studies have examined the effectiveness of CBPFA. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the effectiveness of CBPFA training in promoting occupational self-efficacy and intentions to use CBPFA among oncology care staff over time using a longitudinal design.

Findings

Participants reported increased occupational self-efficacy and intentions to use CBPFA skills after completing training. These factors remained stable at one-month follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of these results are limited by the lack of a control group in the study’s design, relatively homogenous sample and participant dropout.

Originality/value

Despite the study’s limitations, these results represent an initial step in empirically examining the impact of CBPFA trainings and providing evidence that CBPFA may be an effective preparedness and development program in high-stress healthcare settings.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Mike P. Cook, Ashley Boyd and Brandon Sams

The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers’ constructions of youth inform their text selections, particularly as they relate to a problematic author.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers’ constructions of youth inform their text selections, particularly as they relate to a problematic author.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger, national study, the authors use interview data from 18 participants – 9 who still teach and 9 who no longer teach Alexie – to consider how teachers’ constructions of youth play roles in their decisions to teach or avoid complex and controversial authors and topics, specifically the work and life of Sherman Alexie in the #MeToo era.

Findings

Findings suggest teachers who constructed youth through asset-based frameworks – as complex and capable – were likely to keep teaching Alexie or have conversations about the #MeToo movement. Teachers who constructed students in deficit ways, as “not ready,” harkened back to Lesko’s (2012) critique, and were more likely to either remove Alexie from the curriculum entirely or engage students in conversations about the text only, leaving Alexie’s life out of the classroom.

Originality/value

Building on Lesko’s work on constructions of adolescence and its intersection with Petrone et al.’s youth lens and Critical Youth Studies (e.g., Petrone and Lewis, 2021), this study describes the ways in which teachers’ views of students served as rationales for their teaching decisions around whether, if or how to include the works and life of Sherman Alexie.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Leslie H. Blix, Marc Ortegren, Kate Sorensen and Brandon Vagner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of auditor alternative work arrangement (AWA) participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of auditor alternative work arrangement (AWA) participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and distributive justice on organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 110 auditors in the USA, this study uses a regression model to explore how AWA participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and distributive justice affect organizational commitment.

Findings

As predicted, results show both participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural justice significantly affect organizational commitment. However, neither groups’ perceptions of distributive justice significantly affect their organizational commitment.

Originality/value

Organizational justice literature has shown that procedural and distributive justice influence organizational commitment. However, no study has controlled for AWA participation. The authors extend research by investigating the effects of procedural and distributive justice perceptions on organizational commitment for both participants and non-participants. The authors also extend accounting research that has narrowly examined AWA benefits and drawbacks, support, viability and perceptions of subordinate career success. Furthermore, there is limited AWA auditing research and this study offers a view prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Robert E. Lloyd

This paper examines automated contract writing systems, a vital aspect of public procurement which has replaced the more manual methods of drafting of contracts used in…

Abstract

This paper examines automated contract writing systems, a vital aspect of public procurement which has replaced the more manual methods of drafting of contracts used in the past. Using the system of the U.S. federal government as an illustration, the various components of a contract writing system are detailed and discussed, distinguishing contract writing from eprocurement and demonstrating how a bifurcated approach has been adopted for contracting automation. The larger implications of this dual nature are analyzed along with misconceptions about contract writing systems and the contrast between the perspectives of procurement versus finance. Future research devoted more to cross-disciplinary issues and human factors affecting contract writing, rather than just systems development issues, may offer an opportunity to improve the effectiveness of public procurement automation.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

Hendryk Dittfeld, Dirk Pieter van Donk and Sam van Huet

To date, the literature has usually assumed that a universal approach to resilience is appropriate in which different resilience capabilities are equally important for all…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, the literature has usually assumed that a universal approach to resilience is appropriate in which different resilience capabilities are equally important for all organizations independent of contextual characteristics. In contrast this study investigates if production process characteristics affect resilience capabilities in terms of redundancy, flexibility, agility and collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth exploratory multiple case study was carried out in eight companies across different industries. Data were gathered through multiple interviews with key informants in each company.

Findings

The authors find differences in, and trade-offs between, resilience capabilities and practices related to redundancy, agility and collaboration induced by the different configurations of production system characteristics: especially between discrete and process industries. Further, a major influential characteristic is the production strategy employed (make-to-stock or make-to-order) which stresses or limits collaboration and redundancy.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore the effects of production system characteristics as a major contingency factor on the resilience capabilities of an organization. As such it provides valuable insights into the development of a more nuanced contingency approach to how organizations can build resilience and employ specific practices that fit their situation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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