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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Karine Charry and Nathalie T. M. Demoulin

The purpose of this paper is to represent the first empirical investigation of co-branding strategies whose target is children. It analyses such strategies’ potential in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to represent the first empirical investigation of co-branding strategies whose target is children. It analyses such strategies’ potential in the context of brand extension for non-familiar brands combined with familiar ones and provides managerial implications for both brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A leisure centre-based survey was used to collect information on children’s attitudes, evaluations of fit and consumption intentions of co-branded products.

Findings

The findings confirm that co-branding strategies may have a very positive impact on attitudes towards partner brands, intentions to consume co-branded products and the host brand. They also indicate that consumption intentions for other products from the host product category are enhanced. From a theoretical perspective, the study stresses the essential mediating role of brand fit. Indeed, this construct appears to enable preadolescents to integrate simultaneous evaluations of two brands while constructing their attitudes towards one product. The asymmetric spill-over effect is also confirmed, with the non-familiar (weaker) brand benefiting more from the co-branding than the familiar (strong) brand.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations pertain to the small sample size and the absence of direct behavioural measures that could be added through later research. It would also be interesting to study further the concept of fit and the nature of the underlying mediating process (cognitive vs affective) among the target audience, as well as to analyse the impact of the various types of co-branding (functional vs symbolic).

Practical implications

The derived guidelines suggest how non-familiar brands to the pre-adolescent target (including retailers’ brand) may expand their businesses through successful alliances with a more familiar brand that is viewed favourably.

Social implications

In this study, concerns were high to select a co-branded product that does not harm children’s health, to the contrary (vegetable soup with cheese). The results demonstrate that the tactic may increase the target’s intentions to eat products that it would not necessarily fancy (as often the case for healthy products) while contributing to the positive development of economic actors. In this, the paper shows that economic interests should not always be opposed to social welfare.

Originality/value

This study investigates the very popular strategy of brand alliance among an original target (eight-to 12-year-olds) and identifies the original process through which preadolescents appraise two brands that endorse one product, a unique marketing context. This represents an important starting point to further studies on brand alliances.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Griff Round and Stuart Roper

The purpose of this study is to investigate the value to consumers of the brand name element for established brands, given that the focus in the literature has been on new…

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4508

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the value to consumers of the brand name element for established brands, given that the focus in the literature has been on new brands. To accomplish this, conceptual development was initially undertaken to illuminate the links between the brand name element and the brand entity and to provide a theoretical framework for looking at changes in value of the brand name element to consumers over time.

Design/methodology/approach

A conjoint analysis experimental approach was used. This involved consumers making trade-off decisions between changes in brand name and changes in price for established brands, where they were active purchasers. This approach enabled isolation of the brand name element and obtained the relative value of the brand name element for each participant.

Findings

The mean value obtained for the importance of the brand name element for established products appeared to show substantial importance to consumers. However, further analysis identified a position where the majority of participants placed little value on the brand name element and a smaller but material group perceived its value as of overwhelming importance.

Originality/value

This paper advances branding theory through clarification of the relationship between the brand name element and the brand entity. It provides theoretical argument and empirical data for the value of the brand name element to the consumer differing between established and new brands.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Michael S. McCarthy and Donald G. Norris

Assesses how branded ingredients affect consumer product quality perceptions, confidence in product quality perceptions, product evaluations, taste perceptions, purchase…

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6635

Abstract

Assesses how branded ingredients affect consumer product quality perceptions, confidence in product quality perceptions, product evaluations, taste perceptions, purchase likelihoods, and reservation prices of host brands of varying quality. In two experiments, we find that branded ingredients consistently and positively affected moderate‐quality host brands, but only occasionally positively affected higher‐quality host brands. Suggests that managers of both moderate and higher‐quality host brands consider implementing branded ingredient strategies, albeit for different reasons. While moderate‐quality host brands can improve their competitive position by using branded ingredients, higher‐quality host brands generally do not. However, higher‐quality host brands may benefit most by securing the most desirable branded ingredients for their own use, thereby blocking moderate‐quality host brands from using a branded ingredient strategy to improve their competitive position.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Lalit Mohan Kathuria and Paramjeet Gill

The study was conducted with the aim of understanding brand awareness among consumers and analyzing the attitude of consumers towards selected branded commodity food…

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3209

Abstract

Purpose

The study was conducted with the aim of understanding brand awareness among consumers and analyzing the attitude of consumers towards selected branded commodity food products. An attempt was also made to examine the factors influencing the purchase of selected branded commodity food products.

Design/methodology/approach

The products selected for the study were branded rice and branded sugar. A sample of 200 respondents was selected from different localities of a city in India.

Findings

Major sources of awareness, for branded rice and branded sugar, are friends/relatives/reference groups, point-of-purchase display, and retailer's recommendations. Respondents perceive free from adulterants, free from insecticides/pesticides/harmful chemicals and social status as the most important parameters of branded rice and branded sugar. The most important factors influencing the purchase of branded rice and branded sugar were found to be flavor, aroma, free from insecticides or pesticides and free from adulterants.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies can be conducted with a larger sample size. Importance of brand equity with respect to commodity products can be analyzed.

Practical implications

Marketers could frame strategies for different market segments based on demographics. Brand awareness needs to be given adequate focus by the marketers.

Originality/value

This paper has made an attempt to study purchase behaviour with respect to commodity products. Not many studies have been undertaken to analyze brand awareness, and consumers' attitudes towards branded commodity food products in developing countries like India.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Peter Mayer and Robert G. Vambery

Marketers devote great efforts to maintaining brand value. However, brand value can come under attack in the absence of sufficient product performance and image…

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2634

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers devote great efforts to maintaining brand value. However, brand value can come under attack in the absence of sufficient product performance and image differentiation in a process called unbranding. This paper aims to provide insights and guidelines that will give marketing managers tools to deal with variables that impact consumer decisions on whether to buy a national brand or a store brand product.

Design/methodology/approach

A consumer research study was based on a random, mall intercept with 188 respondents consisting of seven questions scored on a ten‐point scale. The results are presented on a set of graphs accompanied with some analysis of means (ANOM) applications.

Findings

Results indicated that a significant portion of consumers (from over 40 percent to a high of 85 percent) feel that the quality differences between branded and generic products have diminished and the price premiums charged by branded products are often no longer justifiable.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study imply that in branded product premium image must be maintained and enhanced, otherwise it will be lost. In addition, the trend of brand value loss referred to as unbranding will vary significantly by and within a product category.

Practical implications

Branded products must maintain their superior consumer perception and product performance. Store or generic brand marketers should exploit the favorable price‐value relationship gained because of the loss of brand value through a process of store branding.

Originality/value

The new concept of unbranding is introduced together with research‐based recommendations for brand value protection strategies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Geetha M. and Gitanjali Naidu

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the attribute preferences of buyers of branded pulses and to study the differences in preferences between consumers who purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the attribute preferences of buyers of branded pulses and to study the differences in preferences between consumers who purchase from traditional retail stores and those who purchase from modern retail stores.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 respondents (150 respondents from traditional and 150 respondents from modern retail outlet) participated in the study. Conjoint analysis was used to assess the consumers’ attribute preferences for branded pulses.

Findings

For both traditional and modern retail outlets, profile with highest utility was the profile with established brand, low price, high quality and normal packaging.

Research limitations/implications

Shoppers of traditional and modern retail outlets have similar attribute preferences for branded pulses. Hence, it can be concluded that the purchase point makes no difference in consumer attribute preferences.

Practical implications

Results indicate that in both traditional and modern retail outlet customers prefer the same profile of attributes. Two important attributes determining their purchase are also the same. Hence a company entering into the sale of branded pulses will have to focus on these two important attributes irrespective of the purchase point.

Originality/value

The topic is relatively less researched in emerging markets especially where both branded pulses and organized retail are in their nascent stages.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Ho Yeol Yu, G. Matthew Robinson and DongHun Lee

This study was conducted to examine the effect of co-branding, a brand partnership tactic involving two or more brands, on consumer behavior within the sport industry. As…

Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to examine the effect of co-branding, a brand partnership tactic involving two or more brands, on consumer behavior within the sport industry. As such, the primary aim was to examine differences regarding consumers' perceptions of self-image congruence and perceived product quality when considering solo-branding and co-branding conditions. Further, under the co-branding condition, relationships among consumers' self-image congruence, perceived product quality, image fit, product evaluation and purchase intention were investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based quasi-experiment consisting of hypothetical co-branding initiatives between existing brands was conducted.

Findings

Results from a repeated multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated that consumers' symbolic and functional perceptions of co-branding as well as evaluations were statistically higher than in the solo-branding condition. Additionally, structural equation modeling indicated positive relationships between consumers' symbolic and functional perceptions, image fit, evaluation and behavior intention.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first papers to investigate the impact of co-branding on consumers within the sport industry and provides evidence of the positive impact of co-branding strategies on consumer behavior within the sport industry.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

William E. Baker, Donald Sciglimpaglia and Massoud Saghafi

After the sale of a primary product, firms often have the opportunity to sell ancillary products or services in support of the primary brand. These add‐ons or services may…

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4059

Abstract

Purpose

After the sale of a primary product, firms often have the opportunity to sell ancillary products or services in support of the primary brand. These add‐ons or services may be offered in a generic or in a branded form. The aim of the this paper is to study the demand for add‐on services in the mobile communications industry and to detail a methodology that can be employed to make this assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

A field experimental design approach using two‐brand manipulations, four‐price points and six content applications was employed. The study was fielded at a mall intercept facility in a major urban center. Interviews with 389 mobile phone users between the ages 18‐31 were conducted.

Findings

Results extend brand equity theory into the context of ancillary product sales and demonstrate that branded ancillary services can command a price premium and are less sensitive to price increases than unbranded alternatives.

Practical implications

Given the growth of demand for non‐voice mobile services, proliferation of such services and the global competition in the industry, marketing managers are under constant pressure to differentiate while achieving revenue goals. This study provides a methodology for managers to calculate the price premium that branded ancillary services may provide over unbranded alternatives and, hence, estimates the worth of potential brand partnerships.

Originality/value

This study extends brand equity theory by recognizing an overlooked scenario: offering branded versus generic ancillary services after the sales of the primary products, through which firms can leverage brand equity benefits.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Juan Mundel, Patricia Huddleston, Bridget Behe, Lynnell Sage and Caroline Latona

This study aims to test the relationship between consumers’ perceptions of product type (utilitarian vs hedonic) and the attentional processes that underlie…

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1380

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the relationship between consumers’ perceptions of product type (utilitarian vs hedonic) and the attentional processes that underlie decision-making among minimally branded products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses eye-tracking measures (i.e. total fixation duration) and data collected through an online survey.

Findings

The study shows that consumers spend more time looking at hedonic (vs utilitarian) and branded (vs unbranded) products, which influences perceptions of quality.

Practical implications

The findings of this research provide guidelines for marketing minimally branded products.

Originality/value

The authors showed that the product type influences the time consumers spend looking at an item. Previous findings about effects of branding are extended to an understudied product category (i.e. live potted plants).

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Arpita Mukherjee, Divya Satija, Tanu M. Goyal, Murali K. Mantrala and Shaoming Zou

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It…

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4753

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It provides key inputs for global retailers to harness the potential in growing consumerism in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 300 Indian consumers was conducted and the data were analysed using descriptive and simple regression techniques.

Findings

The study found that brand purchase in India varies across product categories. At present, consumer knowledge and use of foreign brands is low, and Indian consumers are price‐sensitive. Indian consumers are experimenting with brands and would like more foreign brands to enter the Indian market.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample size, advanced econometrics techniques could not be used to analyse the dataset.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to assess the impact of retail liberalisation on Indian consumers' shopping behaviour, particularly their brand consciousness.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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