Search results

1 – 10 of over 14000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Ulf Johansson, Christian Koch, Nora Varga and Fengge Zhao

This paper aims to explore how the ownership transfer from a highly industrialised country to less industrialised countries influences consumers’ brand perceptions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the ownership transfer from a highly industrialised country to less industrialised countries influences consumers’ brand perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Three acquisition cases of premium car brands (Jaguar, Land Rover and Volvo) are investigated using qualitative data from online brand communities.

Findings

When country of ownership (COOW) for brands changes, it leads to different effects on consumers’ brand perception. Consumers are disoriented as to which cue to apply when evaluating the brand. They also see that brand values, and how these are communicated, are in conflict, as are sustainability images.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the perspective of brand community members in Europe and the USA and studies only the car industry and acquisitions by two countries (China and India) using data from the time of ownership transfers. The authors discuss theoretical implications and suggest further research to gain more insights and address limitations.

Practical implications

Following a transfer of ownership, communication campaigns are required for addressing the original brand’s heritage and promoting the new brand owner’s image. Managers need to take advantage of loyal brand fans by turning them into brand ambassadors, spreading information to convince consumers that are more sceptical.

Originality/value

This study fills the knowledge gap regarding change of COOW to developing countries as new owners, and its consequences for consumer perception. The authors also introduce an innovative type of data collection through brand communities, which is less commonly used in international marketing research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Laurence Beierlein

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relevance and contradictions of development aid in crafting governance responses for enabling long term social upgrading in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relevance and contradictions of development aid in crafting governance responses for enabling long term social upgrading in global garment value chains. Since governance responses are multilevel, we propose to analyse the interrelation between the global and the local level through the case study of a private regulatory initiative of a new type: the Accord on Fire and Building Security in Bangladesh, operationally run like a development aid programme. We aim at explaining the reasons why it has been banned from operating in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

We use the framework of the Global Value Chain (GVC) approach since it is operationally used in development aid and has broadened its focus to investigating the link between economic and social upgrading. It further helps to understand multilevel and multiactor governance responses. Using multiple secondary sources we describe the context in which the Accord emerged, explore its provisions and operations, and analyse the contestation pertaining to its termination. We analyse the Accord both as a global governance tool and a field-level development aid actor that addresses social issues in GVCs.

Findings

As an ILO led operational programme, the Accord, since its inception, has proven globally effective at improving workplace safety for many workers. However it has been resented for being hegemonic and, as a governance tool, it has neither succeeded in addressing the flaws of private regulatory initiatives nor changed existing power relationships in GVCs.

Originality/value

The early termination of the Accord has not yet been analysed. In light of this, we propose new insights on the rising role of development aid in private governance responses.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Anouk de Regt, Matteo Montecchi and Sarah Lord Ferguson

Diffusion of fake news and pseudo-facts is becoming increasingly fast-paced and widespread, making it more difficult for the general public to separate reliable…

Abstract

Purpose

Diffusion of fake news and pseudo-facts is becoming increasingly fast-paced and widespread, making it more difficult for the general public to separate reliable information from misleading content. The purpose of this article is to provide a more advanced understanding of the underlying processes that contribute to the spread of health- and beauty-related rumors and of the mechanisms that can mitigate the risks associated with the diffusion of fake news.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting denialism as a conceptual lens, this article introduces a framework that aims to explain the mechanisms through which fake news and pseudo-facts propagate within the health and beauty industry. Three exemplary case studies situated within the context of the health and beauty industry reveal the persuasiveness of these principles and shed light on the diffusion of false and misleading information.

Findings

The following seven denialistic marketing tactics that contribute to diffusion of fake news can be identified: (1) promoting a socially accepted image; (2) associating brands with a healthy lifestyle; (3) use of experts; (4) working with celebrity influencers; (5) selectively using and omitting facts; (6) sponsoring research and pseudo-science; and (7)exploiting regulatory loopholes. Through a better understanding of how fake news spreads, brand managers can simultaneously improve the optics that surround their firms, promote sales organically and reinforce consumers’ trust toward the brand.

Originality/value

Within the wider context of the health and beauty industry, this article sets to explore the mechanisms through which fake news and pseudo-facts propagate and influence brands and consumers. The article offers several contributions not only to the emergent literature on fake news but also to the wider marketing and consumer behavior literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Prakash Sethi

In the past more than three years, Wal-Mart has been embroiled in incidents of public scandals. In part, they pertain to Wal-Mart’s global strategy of growth and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past more than three years, Wal-Mart has been embroiled in incidents of public scandals. In part, they pertain to Wal-Mart’s global strategy of growth and expansion, where the company’s senior managers have been implicated in using illegal bribery and corruption to secure business and to conceal this information from regulatory authorities. Another issue, albeit longer running, has been the incidents of fire and resulting deaths and injuries of hundreds of people, most notably in Bangladesh, but also in other countries where low-skill, low-wage manufacturing predominates, and where foreign multinationals have been accused of condoning and profiting from sweatshop-like exploitation of workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use Wal-Mart as a microcosm of corporate conduct which provides a prism through which to examine the exploitation of negative externalities, i.e. engaging in illegal and unethical behavior by using their bargaining power and market control these companies, pressure host countries to condone environmental degradation, violation of country laws in terms of wages, working conditions and operating in sweatshop-like conditions to maximize their profits at the expense of other factors of production, i.e. labor and resources.

Findings

The authors contend that Wal-Mart’s unique business model, which focuses on everyday low price, absolute growth and market share expansion by any means possible and everyday low cost, has led to the company’s enormous success since its founding and has made it one of the world’s largest corporations by revenue. At the same time, this model seriously impedes the company’s ability to improve unit-based profit margins and thus forces it to take short cuts in achieving lateral growth and low-cost production.

Social implications

The authors also examine in some detail the large gap that exists between Wal-Mart’s pronouncements of the company’s commitment to ethical and socially responsible conduct and its actual business practices. They demonstrate that the company’s communications and claims for ethical conduct are mostly aspirational and fail the test of accuracy, specificity, materiality and verifiability through independent, externally provided integrity assurance.

Originality/value

Finally, the authors outline a number of measures that would need to be taken by Wal-Mart, industry groups that depend heavily on outsourcing from low-skill, low-wage countries for their products and host country governments and the governments of Western industrialized nations whose corporations and consumers are the primary beneficiaries of the exploitative sweatshops that fatten their companies’ bottom lines and enrich their denizens with ample amounts of inexpensive goods.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Louise Manning

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between an organisation's need to demonstrate compliance with legislative requirements and private assurance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between an organisation's need to demonstrate compliance with legislative requirements and private assurance standards and the protection of their corporate and/or product brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the mechanisms implemented to address legislative compliance, product liability, brand equity and maintaining stakeholder confidence within the context of the supply of safe food.

Findings

The paper finds that, within the international regulatory framework, individual organisations or indeed discrete supply chains must maintain stakeholder confidence in their ability to produce safe, wholesome food, whilst seeking to differentiate products and remaining competitive, especially where brand owners have put significant intellectual and financial resource into the development of either corporate or product brands. Increasingly the corporation identity is now the brand and this is a valuable business asset. In order to protect that asset, effective food safety management must be at the core of organisational strategy and, in the event that such controls fail, crisis management protocols should be in place that can be implemented quickly and effectively.

Originality/value

This paper is of both industrial and academic value.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Noel Yee‐Man Siu and Hon‐Yan Wong

The study investigates the impact of product‐related factors on perceived product safety. The factors examined include price, brand name, country of origin, store name…

Abstract

The study investigates the impact of product‐related factors on perceived product safety. The factors examined include price, brand name, country of origin, store name, source credibility, product testing, promotion channels, discount offered and packaging. Results indicate that the perceived product safety is significantly affected by all of the mentioned factors. Implications are discussed and recommendations are offered to practitioners for attracting the large and growing market of safety‐conscious consumers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Hai Minh Ngo, Ran Liu, Masahiro Moritaka and Susumu Fukuda

While the essential role of brand trust toward consumer decision to purchase food products has been well addressed, there has been still little research on its influential…

Abstract

Purpose

While the essential role of brand trust toward consumer decision to purchase food products has been well addressed, there has been still little research on its influential factors. The primary purpose of this study was to explore factors affecting consumer trust in brands of safe vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling technique was applied to test the hypothetical relationships based on a sample of 361 consumers from a face-to-face interview in the urban areas of Hanoi city, Vietnam, in March and April 2018.

Findings

The authors' findings show that both brand credibility and brand reputation positively affected brand trust. The trustworthiness of a safe vegetable system had a more important role than the competence in building brand trust. While the effects of system trustworthiness on brand trust were found directly and indirectly (through brand credibility), system competence only had an indirect influence on brand trust via brand reputation. Notably, while risk recall directly reduced brand trust, risk information caused a directly positive effect on brand trust. In addition, the impact of food hazards on brand trust was indirect through brand credibility.

Practical implications

Based on our results, the Vietnamese government and stakeholders in the safe vegetable chain should improve brand trust based on fulfilling comprehensive traceability, expanding the brand reputation and providing an appropriate risk communication strategy to the public.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to model and evaluate factors affecting brand trust in the food sector directly and indirectly.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Stéphane Legendre and François Coderre

The purpose of this study is to analyse the impact of two determinants of purchase intention in food label campaigns: altruistic attribution and brand equity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse the impact of two determinants of purchase intention in food label campaigns: altruistic attribution and brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 between-group factorial experimental design was used, with 2 levels of altruistic attribution (high/low) and 2 levels of brand equity (high/low). The product used for the study was pork chops. A survey was conducted on 602 respondents representing the population of Quebec, Canada.

Findings

Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the fit of the data with the proposed mod el. The results demonstrate that altruistic attribution and brand equity have an indirect impact on purchase intention via perceptions of taste and food safety. Altruistic attribution, but not brand equity, also has a direct impact on purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment in this study was conducted via an online consumer panel to increase internal validity. As a result, one of the limitations of the study concerns its external validity.

Practical implications

This research provides strategic guidelines for businesses or organisations that wish to develop food label campaigns. They must simultaneously consider both altruistic attribution and pre-existing brand equity.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by demonstrating the impact of altruistic attribution and brand equity on purchase intention in the context of food label campaigns. The study mobilises attribution theory and the multidimensional consumer-based brand equity scale.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Ruth Yeung and Wallace M.S. Yee

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the incorporation of marketing elements into consumer risk coping strategies affects consumer purchase decision during periods…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the incorporation of marketing elements into consumer risk coping strategies affects consumer purchase decision during periods of food safety concern.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a structured questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of 216 respondents. By using logistic regression, a consumer risk coping framework incorporating marketing strategies was successfully developed to test the impact of brand and quality assurance, price reduction, availability in all stores and endorsement from an independent organization, which may not act alone but combine with each other during food purchase.

Findings

The research confirms that consumers adopt risk coping strategies in time of food risk concern and their coping strategies include marketing elements such as brand and quality assurance, price reduction, availability in all stores and endorsement from an independent organization.

Practical implications

The framework helps marketers to predict the effect of their marketing plan by incorporating consumers' risk coping strategies, in turn to improve consumers' purchase intention when perceived food safety risk exists.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates how marketers can incorporate marketing strategies in a consumer risk coping framework, in order to provide an insight for the industry to evaluate the effectiveness of their marketing strategies in times of food safety concern.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Shalamujiang Maitiniyazi and Maurizio Canavari

Dairy products are an essential part of a healthy diet, and dairy is an emerging food industry in China. Meanwhile, the dairy industry is one of the “disaster zones” with…

Abstract

Purpose

Dairy products are an essential part of a healthy diet, and dairy is an emerging food industry in China. Meanwhile, the dairy industry is one of the “disaster zones” with quality and safety issues occurring more frequently in its supply chain than in others. Based on qualitative research focused on consumers in the Northwest and South of China, the present study aims to understand and provide information on consumer perception of food safety in dairy products.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine focus group interviews were carried out from January to April 2018. Altogether, 61 participants (24 males, 37 females, aged 18–60 years) were recruited in four cities. Qualitative content analysis of the data was conducted using Nvivo version 11.4.0.

Findings

A high concern with the safety of dairy products is widespread, particularly among participants with children, who are especially worried about the safety of dairy products. High prevalence of food safety incidents causes consumers to lower their confidence in food safety, and make them pay more attention to the news about food safety incidents. Consumers tend to become less sensitive to price, focusing more on food safety and quality, while purchasing dairy products. Brand and purchase venue are the most important indicators for consumers to determine the quality of dairy products. Safety certification becomes increasingly important.

Research limitations/implications

It has some limitations. The focus group interviews covered different two regions (Northwest and South of China). However, the number of focus groups was limited to nine because of budget constraints. The participants come from Northwest and South of the country, which means that the findings may not apply for another area of the country. A more representative sampling with a larger sample size would be necessary to increase the validity of the study. However, the results can serve as input for further research.

Originality/value

This paper explores the Chinese consumers' perception of food safety and dairy products, consumers' behaviour concerning dairy products based on focus group interviews with consumers. This study offers valuable insights to members of academia, food suppliers and policy-makers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000