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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Danny Tengti Kao

While envy has been widely explored in psychology literature, theoretical understanding of the effects of envy on consumers’ emotional responses to brands is promising but…

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1861

Abstract

Purpose

While envy has been widely explored in psychology literature, theoretical understanding of the effects of envy on consumers’ emotional responses to brands is promising but under explored. Therefore, this study aims to apply cases of envy and psychological distance to consumers to examine whether the style of brand storytelling can moderate brand preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies were conducted to test the hypotheses. Experiment 1 investigated the effect of envy on consumer evaluations of an advocated brand, through viewing a series of advertisements that varied in brand storytelling styles. A total of 104 working students were randomly assigned to a 2 (brand storytelling: underdog vs top dog) single factorial design. Experiment 2 investigates the effect of envy on consumer evaluations of the advocated brand through viewing advertisements that varied in psychological distance. A total of 108 working students were randomly assigned to a 2 (psychological distance: proximal vs distant) single factorial design. Experiment 3 investigated the effect of envy on evaluations of the brand through viewing advertisements that varied in brand storytelling style and psychological distance. A total of 208 working students were randomly assigned to a 2 (underdog vs top dog) × 2 (proximal vs distant psychological distance) between-subject factorial design.

Findings

Results demonstrate that for consumers experiencing benign and malicious envy, advertisements characterized by brand storytelling (underdog vs top dog) and psychological distance (proximal vs distant) will elicit differential brand preferences.

Originality/value

This research takes up the call to address the limited attention given to envy in the context of brand advertising. Specifically, this research aims to explore how consumer envy influences brand preference and the role of moderating effects such as brand storytelling and psychological distance in this context.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Riza Casidy Mulyanegara and Yelena Tsarenko

This paper aims to examine and compare the strength of personality and values in predicting brand preferences. It seeks to accomplish three main objectives. First, it will…

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5820

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and compare the strength of personality and values in predicting brand preferences. It seeks to accomplish three main objectives. First, it will evaluate the strength of personality and values in predicting consumers' brand preferences. Second, it will examine whether values exercise a mediating role between personality and brand preferences. Finally, it will examine the mediating role of prestige sensitivity in influencing brand preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study opted to use a quantitative approach involving 251 undergraduate students as the study participants. The constructs used in the study are taken from existing scales as well as self‐developed branding scales. Structural equation modeling technique is utilised for data analysis.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how personality and values together affect brand preferences. It suggests that values are indeed better predictors of brand preferences and exercise both direct and indirect effects on brand preferences through the mediating role of prestige sensitivity.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the self‐report method used for personality assessment, there may be bias in terms of the nature of respondents' personality as expressed in the questionnaire.

Practical implications

The paper suggests implications for the development of a strong brand personality which can appeal to both consumer personality and values.

Originality/value

This paper poses interesting insights and empirical evidence with regard to the predictive power of personality and values on brand preferences within a fashion context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Salma Rahman and Sarwar Azhar

The purpose of this paper is to verify the consumer preference and choice behavior; also determine the speculative low loyalty behavior of consumers belonging to…

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4544

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify the consumer preference and choice behavior; also determine the speculative low loyalty behavior of consumers belonging to generation Y sub segment – adults (age 19‐28) and their perceptions regarding various brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 100 university students in Pakistan belonging to the age group 19‐28 years old. The research was concentrated in the mobile phone service sector. Data analysis was conducted using statistical analysis software SPSS.

Findings

The results indicate that stated preference set and actual choice behavior are dissimilar. The generation Y adults sub group contra‐indicates loyalty characteristics as high in a developing market context against the established wisdom of low loyalty found in developed countries. The perceptual maps of brands indicate no distinct personality characteristics necessitating marketers to rethink their strategies in this service industry. Finally, this research reconciles the gap between loyalty, stated preference and distinctiveness of brand personalities.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation pertains to the target segment of 19‐28 years old. Future research could be expanded to other demographic segments and use other products and brands.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is that it will advance theory regarding generation‐based characteristics to a less developed economy context by verifying theoretical proposition with regard to brand preferences and revealed brand choices. Second, marketers would be able to focus their promotions keeping in mind the perception and loyalty factors.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Matthew Tingchi Liu, Ipkin Anthony Wong, Guicheng Shi, Rongwei Chu and James L. Brock

This paper aims to investigate how corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance (i.e. to the environment, society and stakeholders) and perceived brand quality…

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14466

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance (i.e. to the environment, society and stakeholders) and perceived brand quality influence brand preference. The mediating effect of perceived brand quality on the relationship between CSR performance and brand preference is also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2011, 243 valid responses to questionnaire surveys were collected from a convenience sample in China. Regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Customers’ brand preference can be enhanced by CSR performance. Performance in each of the three CSR domains (i.e. environment, society and stakeholders) positively impacts brand preference, although to different degrees. The impact of CSR on stakeholders has the strongest influence on Chinese customers’ brand preference among the three CSR domains. Perceived brand quality was found to be a mediator of the relationship between CSR performance and brand preference.

Research limitations/implications

This research studies the relationship between CSR performance and brand preference. Results show CSR performance is not the strongest predictor of branding outcomes, its explanatory power is comparatively weaker than that of perceived brand quality. Additionally, we found a mediating effect of perceived brand quality on the relationship between CSR performance and brand preference.

Practical implications

Brands can be more attractive to Chinese consumers when brands take appropriate investments in CSR activities. A socially responsible brand is not guaranteed to yield a competitive advantage. Instead a competitive advantage will more likely result through the employment of the appropriate CSR strategies, with a focus on stakeholders’ interests.

Originality/value

The current research contributes to the literature by finding that not all CSR activities are equally effective. Customers in emerging markets still appear to be focused more on the quality of brands and, to some extent, stakeholder CSR practice, as these provide direct benefits to customers. Findings of this study also support the notion that Chinese consumers are beginning to use CSR information to evaluate brands.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Ahmed Alamro and Jennifer Rowley

This paper aims to report on a study into the antecedents of consumer brand preference, in the context of telecommunications service brands in Jordan.

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7549

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a study into the antecedents of consumer brand preference, in the context of telecommunications service brands in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based survey was used to gather attitudes towards brand preference and its antecedents in the context of mobile telecommunications service providers in Jordan. The questionnaire was distributed, in Arabic, to university students in Jordan, a group selected as being active users of mobile phone services; 648 completed questionnaires were received. Data were entered into SPSS. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to identify the antecedents of brand preference. Multiple regression was conducted in order to investigate the relative impact of the identified factors on brand preference.

Findings

Factor analysis identified 11 antecedents of brand preference; these can be theoretically clustered into three groups: awareness antecedents (controlled communication (advertising), and uncontrolled communication (publicity, word of mouth)); image antecedents (service value attributes (price, quality), provider attributes (brand personality, country of origin, service (employee + location)), and corporate status (corporate image, corporate reputation)); and, customer attribute antecedents (satisfaction, perceived risk, and reference group). Multiple regression showed the contribution of each of these antecedents to brand preference.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to theorise by proposing and testing one of the first holistic models to integrate consideration of many of the antecedents of brand preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2019

Danny Tengti Kao and Pei-Hsun Wu

The competition among banks in Taiwan is fierce. The financial services offered by banks are highly similar and banks attempt to devise a variety of marketing campaigns to…

Abstract

Purpose

The competition among banks in Taiwan is fierce. The financial services offered by banks are highly similar and banks attempt to devise a variety of marketing campaigns to gain brand preferences of bank clients. However, little research regarding bank marketing has applied the segmentation strategy to precisely target bank clients. The purpose of this paper is to explore the moderating roles of cognitive load and brand story style in the impact of bank clients’ affective orientation on brand preference of bank clients.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 216 participants who have bank accounts in Taiwan were randomly assigned to a 2 (brand story style: underdog vs top dog) × 2 (cognitive load: low vs high) factorial design. An ANOVA was conducted to examine the interaction effects of affective orientation, cognitive load and brand story style on the brand preference of bank clients. Affective orientation of participants was measured by Affective Orientation Scale.

Findings

Results demonstrate that for bank clients with low and high affective orientation, advertisements characterized by cognitive load (low vs high) and brand story style (underdog vs top dog) will elicit differential brand preferences of bank clients.

Originality/value

This is the first research to examine the moderating effects of bank clients’ affective orientation, cognitive load and brand story style on brand preferences of bank clients. Specifically, this research takes up the call to apply bank clients’ personality traits to examine the impact of bank marketing on brand preferences of banks.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Matthew Tingchi Liu, Ipkin Anthony Wong, Chu Rongwei and Ting-Hsiang Tseng

This study aims to investigate how perceptions associated with corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influence customers’ preference and loyalty in a…

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5033

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how perceptions associated with corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influence customers’ preference and loyalty in a controversial consumer market. The mediating effect of brand preference between perceived CSR initiatives and customer loyalty is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology in the current study involves the use of questionnaire surveys delivered to a convenience sample in the city of Macau in 2012. A total of 616 valid samples were collected among casino players in a high bet limit area in six major casinos. Regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses formulated for carrying the study forward.

Findings

The findings indicated that customers’ brand preference can be enhanced by their perceptions on CSR. Two CSR initiatives (stakeholders and society) significantly increase loyalty intention, although to varying degrees. The impact of CSR on stakeholders has a stronger influence on customers’ brand preference. Another important finding of the current study is the fact that brand preference is a partial mediator of perceived CSR initiatives and customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study verified the relationship among CSR initiatives perception, brand preference and loyalty intention in the context of the Macau gaming industry. Perceived CSR initiatives enhance customer loyalty. Additionally, this study found a partial mediating effect of brand preference between CSR perception and customer loyalty.

Practical implications

Customer loyalty can be enhanced with companies’ appropriate investments in social responsibilities. Although a socially responsible brand image of a company is not guaranteed to be a competitive advantage that attracts more premium customers, there is a general consensus that it may result in the latter with appropriate CSR strategies involving the greatest attention directed toward improving stakeholders’ interests. From the marketing perspective, retaining premium customers with a higher brand preference level is a key to both long-term competitiveness and profitability.

Originality/value

This study investigates how premium customers’ perceived CSR initiatives of a casino influence their loyalty intention, and also examines how brand preference, as a mediator, influences the relationship between perceived CSR and loyalty intention. Extending the realm of CSR study to understand the linkage between CSR and customer behaviors is also important because multiple theories predict different benefits, and assessing the value of CSR, therefore, requires multiple approaches. Finally, evidence from the research is significant for researchers and practitioners, especially when working on conflicting issues.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 33 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2013

Daniel Howard and Roger Kerin

A lack of empirical evidence currently exists verifying name similarity effects on brand level choice and behavior. This research aims to test for and document the…

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2661

Abstract

Purpose

A lack of empirical evidence currently exists verifying name similarity effects on brand level choice and behavior. This research aims to test for and document the existence of a surname brand preference effect – whether individuals with surnames that match the names of brands prefer them more than other brands and behave in a manner consistent with those preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

In two studies consisting of four national surveys, 50 consumer brands across 23 product categories were examined.

Findings

Findings reveal that respondents with surnames that match well-known national brands more than doubled their preference rate for that brand. Findings also reveal that for consumers who prefer a brand, surname matching results in them being more than twice as likely to label themselves as brand advocates.

Originality/value

These findings represent the first comprehensive examination of name similarity effects on brand preferences and advocacy. The data support and extend existing theoretical findings regarding an ego-driven interpretation of those effects. Implications for marketing practice and future research are highlighted.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Enav Friedmann and Oded Lowengart

This paper aims to address the role of product involvement in the brand preference formation of men and women. Product involvement can be defined as a consumer’s…

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1120

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the role of product involvement in the brand preference formation of men and women. Product involvement can be defined as a consumer’s motivation for product purchase that affects their information processing strategies when forming a brand preference (e.g. more automatic at low levels vs more deliberative at high levels). Given that gender differences are found to be context-dependent, it was expected that, when forming a single brand preference, men would emphasize instrumental aspects (functional and socially conspicuous utilities) and women the experiential utility of the brand only with high-involvement-level products.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive survey (n = 459) using structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was used following an online experiment where involvement level was manipulated (n = 255) to validate the results.

Findings

Stereotypical gender differences appeared at high, but not low-involvement levels. Theoretically, these findings question the evolutionary basis of gender differences, as differences were not consistent at both levels.

Practical implications

The findings raise questions about the efficacy of segmenting by gender when aiming to increase brand preference of low-involvement products, whereas stereotypical targeting seem to be effective for increasing preference for high-involvement ones.

Originality/value

For the first time, the role of product involvement and gender was examined in brand preference formation. This can theoretically clarify whether gender differences are consistent or dependent on the level of involvement. This information can help in designing efficient marketing strategies for products with different involvement levels.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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