Search results

1 – 10 of over 32000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2015

Sarah (Song) Southworth and Minjeong Kim

There is a rising number of Asian brands expanding to Western nations. However, one of the biggest challenges is their reputation of inferior quality. The objectives of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a rising number of Asian brands expanding to Western nations. However, one of the biggest challenges is their reputation of inferior quality. The objectives of this research are to examine the U.S. consumers’ quality perception of Asian brands and what steps can be taken to improve their perceived quality to ultimately influence patronage intentions. This study also considers how age influences U.S. consumers’ perceived quality and patronage intentions.

Methodology/approach

An online experiment using 328 U.S. female subjects was conducted to examine how quality cues (brand origin and product design) influence their perceived quality of Asian brands. The study also examines how age (due to different levels of exposure of Asian brands) moderates the relationship between product cues and perceived quality.

Findings

The findings showed that there was a difference between the younger (Generation X and Y) and older (Baby boomers and Swing) group’s perceived quality of these Asian brand origins, namely Japan and China. Product design had an impact on perceived quality, but age was not a moderating factor.

Implications

Chinese and Japanese brands can use these differences in perception of brand origins to market accordingly. Product design cues can also be used effectively to both age groups by Asian brands to improve the perceived quality of U.S. consumers.

Originality/value

This research provides novel insight on U.S. consumers’ perceived quality and patronage intentions from different Asian brand cues. The study also contributes to the body of literature on how the relationship between specific Asian brand cues and perceived quality may differ as a function of age.

Details

International Marketing in the Fast Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-233-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Emerson Wagner Mainardes, Vinicius Costa Amorim Gomes, Danilo Marchiori, Luis Eugenio Correa and Vinicius Guss

The purpose of this paper is to verify the differences of the influence of customer experience quality on brand equity, brand trustworthiness, perceived quality, perceived

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify the differences of the influence of customer experience quality on brand equity, brand trustworthiness, perceived quality, perceived risk and purchase intention of franchise customers and non-franchise customers.

Design/methodology/approach

After developing two questionnaires, the authors collected 523 responses from Brazilian franchise users (Questionnaire 1) and 574 of non-franchise users (Questionnaire 2). The authors proceed to a confirmatory factor analysis, based on covariance (CB-SEM). In order to compare the results between franchises and non-franchises, the authors have performed a multi-group analysis with support of AMOS.

Findings

The results show that customer experience quality of the franchise customers tends to result in a better purchase intention, giving indications of better quality and brand trustworthiness when compared to non-franchises. This comparison shows indications of the competitive advantage of franchises over non-franchises, justifying the investments that market companies have been making in the development of the customer experience quality.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of the impact of the customer experience quality on brand equity, brand trustworthiness, perceived quality, perceived risk and purchase intention that directly affects the performance of the franchises, empirically investigating the customer experience quality in the context of franchises using the adapted EXQ scale. Complementarily, it is compared with non-franchises to observe the differences between them.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Vanessa Quintal and Ian Phau

The purpose of this paper is to examine brand familiarity, extrinsic attributes, self‐confidence, perceived quality and six dimensions of perceived risk for their effects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine brand familiarity, extrinsic attributes, self‐confidence, perceived quality and six dimensions of perceived risk for their effects on purchase intentions between the prototypical and me‐too brands of MP3 players.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered survey was employed to collect data from 348 lead users of MP3 players. Existing scales were selected for their tested reliability in buying situations and adapted to suit the context of the current study. Hypothesized relationships were examined with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Brand familiarity had positive effects and extrinsic attributes had negative effects on the perceived equivalent quality of the MP3 players for both the prototypical and me‐too brands. Further, brand familiarity and extrinsic attributes produced direct effects on purchase intentions for the me‐too and prototypical brands respectively. While perceived equivalent quality had a positive mediating effect on the brand familiarity‐purchase intentions relationship for the me‐too brands, it had a negative mediating effect on the extrinsic attributes‐purchase intentions relationship for the prototypical brand. Finally, perceived social/physical, financial/performance, time and psychological risks produced negative mediating effects on the perceived equivalent quality‐purchase intentions relationship for the prototypical brand, while social/physical risk produced a positive mediating effect for the me‐too brands.

Originality/value

Previous empirical research has focused primarily on the individual effects of these antecedents. A research model integrates these antecedents with the dimensions of perceived risk and tests their hypothesized effects on purchase intentions. Comparisons between the prototypical and me‐too brands of MP3 players provide insights for practitioners when managing their brands.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2009

Jin-Wook Han and Hyungil H Kwon

The purpose of the study was to confirm the mediating effect of perceived quality in the relationship between two extrinsic cues (brand name and country of origin)and…

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to confirm the mediating effect of perceived quality in the relationship between two extrinsic cues (brand name and country of origin)and perceived value previously tested by Teas and Agarwal (2000) using more rigorous statistical techniques - regression analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM) - in a sports consumption context. Data were collected from 194 members of the Korea University Ski Team Association. Based on the results, the partially mediated model was selected as the best fitting model. From a marketing perspective, ski marketers need to understand that the two extrinsic cues had direct and indirect influences through perceived quality on perceived value of the ski product.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Aikaterini Manthiou, Juhee Kang and Thomas Schrier

This paper aims to empirically examine how five different brand equity dimensions of a festival brand (i.e. awareness, image, quality, value and loyalty) are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically examine how five different brand equity dimensions of a festival brand (i.e. awareness, image, quality, value and loyalty) are inter-related. Specifically, this study aims to examine the impact of brand awareness on perceived brand image, perceived brand quality and perceived value; the impact of perceived brand image on perceived brand quality and brand loyalty; and the impact of perceived brand quality on perceived value and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model was tested with an onsite sample of a public festival referred to as the VEISHEA (Veterinary Medicine, Engineering, Industrial Science, Home Economics and Agriculture) festival, which is located in a Midwestern college-town. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to reach the goals of the study.

Findings

The findings revealed that improving attendees’ awareness is a keystone in promoting brand quality perceptions, increasing perceived value and creating favorable brand image. Perceptions of quality on brand loyalty were stronger than any other effect, pointing out the need for superior quality. These findings confirmed that a public festival which does not require visitor admission fees can increase visitors by utilizing branding strategies, as has been done with other types of festivals.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted at a public festival. Further study should be conducted at other festivals/events. Analysis of antecedents such as advertising and promotions in the brand equity creation process will provide further important information.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance for practitioners to manage festival brands properly and develop strategies (e.g. communications and promotions) which reinforce the intangible asset of brand equity.

Originality/value

This is the first study that applies the brand equity concept to the setting of public festivals. This application to a new context contributes to the body of knowledge of brand equity theory.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Devon DelVecchio and Sanjay Puligadda

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the negative effect of lower prices on perceived brand quality that has been demonstrated in evaluation tasks arises in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the negative effect of lower prices on perceived brand quality that has been demonstrated in evaluation tasks arises in a brand choice context.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects of lower prices on perceived quality are assessed via two laboratory experiments in which college students participated.

Findings

A lower price is associated with lower perceived brand quality in Study 1's evaluation task environment. However, Study 2's results indicate a reversal of the negative effects of lower prices on perceived brand quality in an evaluation task to generally positive effects when the lower price is offered in the form of a discount in a choice task.

Practical implications

In addition to providing evidence that fears of the detrimental effects of lower prices may be overblown, the results also provide insight to managers of brands of different levels of quality on how to manage discounts to build, or at least to insulate, perceptions of the brand's quality.

Originality/value

The paper's findings may guide both managerial practice and future research on the effects of lower prices, particularly those in the form of a discount.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Magali Jara, Gérard Cliquet and Isabelle Robert

The purpose of this paper is to tackle the issue of store brand equity by considering two store brand’s positioning strategies: those with high perceived added value (the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to tackle the issue of store brand equity by considering two store brand’s positioning strategies: those with high perceived added value (the organic store brands), as opposed to economic brands. It takes place in the current environmental considerations showing the important role played by the packaging in determining the store brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

A PLS Path model divided into four sub-models enables the authors to make specific predictions about customers’ purchase intentions. It also provides a concise operational calculation of the brand equity of each studied store brand.

Findings

Results show that economic brands build their equity with reinforced packaging, and organic brands maximise their brand equity by using simple packaging. In general, reinforced packaging improves the perceived quality of economic store brands but destroys that of organic brands. The calculations of overall equity scores for each studied store brand reveal that economic brands could benefit from further development whilst organic brands already maximise their equity.

Practical implications

Results will enable large retailers to develop effective campaigns focussing on perceived quality and more specifically by designing packaging that are suitable for the positioning of their brands – a simple packaging for organic brands and a reinforced packaging for economic brands to maximise customers’ value.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to deepen the store brand equity, comparing two contrasting types of brands, by studying specifically variations of the levels of customers’ perceived quality depending of two types of packaging.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Philippe Aurier and Gilles Séré de Lanauze

This paper aims to contribute to the empirical validation of the relationship model as it applies to the case of major national brands positioned in the frequently…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the empirical validation of the relationship model as it applies to the case of major national brands positioned in the frequently purchased packaged goods markets, and propose the perceived brand relationship orientation concept as an additional antecedent of trust, affective commitment and attitudinal loyalty. Yet, for a relationship to exist, the parties need to be mutually considered as potential relational partners. This paper seeks to introduce the concept of perceived brand relationship orientation, which is considered, along with perceived quality, as a significant direct antecedent of relationship quality (trust and affective commitment) and, indirectly, attitudinal loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical application involves major national brands positioned in frequently purchased packaged goods food categories (ice cream and frozen meals). The conceptualization and measurement of the perceived brand relationship orientation bears on a qualitative analysis of marketing experts and consumers. Refinement and validation of measures are applied to a convenience sample of 153 students and finally to a sample of 404 consumers, using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Structural equation modeling is used to test the model and hypotheses.

Findings

First, the authors validate the relationship marketing model in the case of strong national brands positioned in the frequently purchased packaged goods sector. The authors show that perceived quality impacts relationship quality (trust and affective commitment), which in turn influences attitudinal loyalty. Second, in addition to the effects of perceived quality, the authors show that perceived brand relationship orientation has direct positive impacts on trust and affective commitment and, in turn, has an indirect impact on attitudinal loyalty. However, this effect is limited to the case where consumers have a high (versus low) level of attitude toward the brand.

Research limitations/implications

The application is limited to only two product categories and to strong national brands that enjoy high levels of perceived quality and attitude. Also, the model could be connected to behavioral loyalty metrics, in addition to attitudinal loyalty. The moderating impacts of relational disposition toward the brand should also be tested in future research.

Practical implications

To develop consumers' attitudinal loyalty, brands must invest in programs converting efficiently perceived quality into trust and affective commitment as bases for differentiation and competitive advantage. Implications for brands' communication and distribution policies come along together with the necessity of enhancing the contacts and dialogue between the brand and the consumers. This confirms the potential outputs of brands' CRM strategies in the case of frequently purchased packaged good categories.

Originality/value

The conceptualization of BPRO in the case of frequently purchased packaged good categories is a new step in the consumer‐brand relationship understanding.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

John Story and Peggy Sue Loroz

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a series of precepts which explain the role of technology and technology congruence in consumers' perceptions of brand extensions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a series of precepts which explain the role of technology and technology congruence in consumers' perceptions of brand extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of relationships between technological congruence and consumer evaluations of brand extensions is proposed. Regression analysis and a series of planned contrasts are employed to test these relationships.

Findings

In general, extensions that are higher in overall technology content are perceived as being higher in quality. Higher technology brands benefit from a superordinate brand technology effect. However, this technology content effect is moderated by the congruence/incongruence of the levels of technology of the brands, products, and attributes.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitations of this research are that it focused on a relatively small and homogeneous segment of the population (average age 24) and it tested the effects of technological incongruence only on perceived quality.

Practical implications

These results have extensive implications for designing and positioning brand extensions in the market. The implications are particularly salient for brands that are perceived as employing relatively low technology.

Originality/value

These results improve one's understanding of customers' responses to brand extensions, particularly when the product or associated attributes are technologically incongruent with the brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 32000