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Article

Marina Toledo de Arruda Lourenção, Letícia Miyamaru, Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi and Silvia Inês Dallavalle de Pádua

Sectoral brand management processes have presented planning, development and implementation challenges. With the aim of reducing these managerial problems, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Sectoral brand management processes have presented planning, development and implementation challenges. With the aim of reducing these managerial problems, the purpose of this paper is to revise the structure and the processes of the sectoral brands management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative exploratory study, with its unit of analysis being the process of managing the brand of the Brazilian fashion sector. Primary data collection was obtained through in-depth interviews with the seven industry associations and with the company responsible for the brand consulting. The secondary data used were reports about the branding process of the brand provided by respondents. Data analysis was provided by using the VSM to modeling sector structure and BPMN to processes modeling.

Findings

The results present a new sectoral brand structure and process to reduce existing barriers. Three sections were carried out: analysis and modeling of the current structure and processes of sectoral brand management; presentation of the current structure and processes problems; analysis and modeling of future structure and processes of sectoral brand management.

Research limitations/implications

A theoretical contribution is provided in the literature of systems, processes and sectoral brands, since there are no previous studies that elaborated a system structure and process for sectoral brands. In addition, other theoretical contribution is the presentation of a future process model that relates brand management process with its system structure, that is, it relates BPM analysis with VSM.

Practical implications

It is also possible to indicate that VSM and BPM can contribute to the management of sectoral brands, through the structural and process problems identification and also by making possible to suggest future management improvements to reduce the barriers that were identified.

Originality/value

The present study originality is the approach of the first analysis of sector brand management with emphasis on its structure and processes that were experienced by the Brazilian fashion sector.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Lea Prevel Katsanis

Asserts that the traditional approach to brand management is changing and there has been a quiet shift towards a new structural paradigm in the marketing organization…

Abstract

Asserts that the traditional approach to brand management is changing and there has been a quiet shift towards a new structural paradigm in the marketing organization. This change represents a move away from a system that focuses on the individual brand manager, who is responsible for all the business activities that relate to ensuring the success of a specific brand. Investigates the ways that these new marketing organizational structures will affect competitive advantage. Outlines a proposed holistic systems framework.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Mathieu Dunes and Bernard Pras

This paper aims to analyze the impact of brand management system (BMS) practices on subjective and objective performance in both service- and product-oriented sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the impact of brand management system (BMS) practices on subjective and objective performance in both service- and product-oriented sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a “grounded-in-practice” approach to BMS, a comprehensive formative BMS scale is developed and its validity is assessed. The impact of BMS on subjective brand performance (i.e. predictive validity) and on objective financial performance is assessed. Data are collected from a sample of 298 brand managers and marketing directors in five business sectors (cosmetics, convenience goods, industry, bank/insurance and media) and from a financial database. Path analysis and multigroup analysis are performed to test mediating and moderating effects.

Findings

The results reveal that subjective brand performance (perceived brand performance) mediates the relationship between the BMS and objective financial performance of the firm and on each of the three BMS dimensions; and product-oriented (vs service-oriented) sector positively moderates the relationship between the BMS and subjective brand performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers insights into adapting brand management practices along all BMS dimensions to achieve better business performance and improve objective financial performance in product-oriented activities. It highlights the role of brand management implementation, as well as the role of brand management in hierarchical relationships, in improving performance in service activities.

Practical implications

The formative BMS scale offers a tool which can be used to improve strategic decisions and give practical guidance on product vs service sector specificities. The indirect impact of a BMS on financial objective performance reinforces the legitimacy of brand managers and marketing managers.

Originality/value

This paper shows the impact of the BMS on objective financial performance by using a “grounded-in-practice” BMS scale. It also affords explanation on sectoral effects of brand management practices and their consequences on subjective and objective performance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Avinandan Mukherjee and Rahul Roy

Success of a television game show requires brand‐building effort and brand value management like any other product. However, aspects of information, entertainment…

Abstract

Purpose

Success of a television game show requires brand‐building effort and brand value management like any other product. However, aspects of information, entertainment, novelty, instant gratification, and experience dimensions are more salient in game shows. This has been amply proven by the television game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. The purpose of this research is to explore why some entertainment products succeed, while others fail.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we present the system dynamic model of brand management of the game show Kaun Banega Crorepati (KBC), the Indian version of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. Initially, we present the reference mode behaviour, drawn from published data. In the dynamic model, we include factors such as channel popularity, host popularity, prize money, and competition that work towards building the viewership and influencing operational revenues. Computer‐based simulation and experimentalism are then applied as a research method to the model to explore its dynamic behaviour.

Findings

Our analysis shows that the right mix of host popularity, channel popularity and prize money has enabled KBC to achieve unprecedented success.

Research limitations/implications

Validation of the model is based on the strength that the simulation results can replicate the reference mode behaviour and produce behaviour expected under extreme conditions. The validated model is used to draw what‐if scenarios, some of which resemble the experiences of competing game shows.

Originality/value

Understanding the dynamics of brand management of this game show can serve as an important tool for brand management of entertainment products. Further, the use of system dynamics for dynamic modelling of brand value has application in broader areas of marketing, and would be of interest to a wide managerial audience.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article

Isabelle Aimé, Fabienne Berger-Remy and Marie-Eve Laporte

The purpose of this study is to perform a historical analysis of the brand management system (BMS) to understand why and how, over the past century, the BMS has become the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to perform a historical analysis of the brand management system (BMS) to understand why and how, over the past century, the BMS has become the dominant marketing organizational model across Western countries and sectors and what the lessons can be learned from history to enlighten its current changes in today’s digitized environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on Low and Fullerton’s work (1994), the paper traces the evolution of the BMS from its creation in the 1930s to the recent digital era. Data from various sources – research papers, historical business books, case studies, newspaper articles and internal documents – are analyzed to inform an intellectual historical analysis of the BMS’s development.

Findings

The paper uses the prism of institutional isomorphism to highlight four distinct periods that show that the BMS has gradually imposed itself on the Western world and managed to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Moreover, it shows that in the current digital age, the BMS is now torn between two opposing directions: the brand manager should act as both absolute expert and galvanic facilitator and the BMS needs to reinvent itself once again.

Originality/value

This paper provides a broad perspective on the BMS function to help marketing scholars, historians and practitioners gain a better understanding of the issues currently facing the BMS and its relevance in the digital age.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article

Mathieu Dunes and Bernard Pras

Brand management systems (BMSs) are of prime importance for brands to monitor effective brand management and enhance firms' performance. The existing scales take various…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand management systems (BMSs) are of prime importance for brands to monitor effective brand management and enhance firms' performance. The existing scales take various conceptual bases and sometimes eliminate some dimensions, depending on the sector of activity. Based on praxis and a variety of sectors, the purpose of this paper is to identify stable dimensions of BMSs and make configurational patterns emerge according to firms' and sector's characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 15 in-depth interviews (with a semi-structured questionnaire) were conducted with marketing and communication directors in five sectors of activity (cosmetics, convenience goods, industry, bank/insurance, media). Content analysis was used to examine the configurational patterns that emerged, following a strategy-as-practice approach.

Findings

A general BMS pattern emerged from the content analysis with three dimensions: brand identity and values-based, hierarchically based, and implementation based. Interestingly, typical configurations were identified on each dimension and distinct configurational patterns for five sectors.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research on other sectors is suggested to further validate the findings as well as building a scale on the basis of the general pattern to analyze the effect of BMS on performance.

Practical implications

Configurational patterns represent a flexible, adaptive, and easy-to-apply way to approach and monitor BMS for researchers and managers.

Originality/value

This cross-sector research delineates innovative and integrated BMS dimensions and subdimensions emerging from practice and examines their universality. The key subdimension(s) for each dimension is (are) identified and related to recent research on BMS.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Marina Toledo de Arruda Lourenção and Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

The purpose of this paper is to propose an identity model for sector brands and examines its applicability for the Brasil Fashion System brand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an identity model for sector brands and examines its applicability for the Brasil Fashion System brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature on corporate brand identity models is undertaken. The interviews were carried out with two interest groups: the associations comprising the brand, and the consultancy company responsible for sector brand advisory.

Findings

The sector brand identity model is applicable to the Brasil Fashion System brand with the exception of two elements. The application may have experienced some adversity because of the considerable divergence among the associations. In cases where the brand represents just one association, the application of the model may occur with more favorable element management.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical contribution occurred toward sector brands and brand identity with the development of an identity model for the sector brand, so far not addressed in academic studies.

Practical implications

When adopting the identity model for sector brands, managers would be able to understand the components that have to be managed on sector brand identity. The model can contribute to improve the management of these kinds of brands.

Originality/value

The academic studies of corporate brand identity models and sector brands are analyzed in order to create the first sector brand identity model that was experienced by the Brazilian fashion industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Lea Prevel Katsanis, Jean‐Paul G. Laurin and Dennis A. Pitta

Examines the types and characteristics of the new forms of the brand management system in marketing organizations as identified in previous research and previous existing…

Abstract

Examines the types and characteristics of the new forms of the brand management system in marketing organizations as identified in previous research and previous existing research on performance appraisal systems. Draws linkages between the two systems to provide a framework for maximizing individual product manager’s performance, thereby maximizing overall organizational performance. Sets out a number of managerial implications and suggests areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Simon Knox

The erosion in the authority of brands within consumer marketsbrings into question the orthodoxy of traditional marketing practicesacross all markets. Argues that…

Abstract

The erosion in the authority of brands within consumer markets brings into question the orthodoxy of traditional marketing practices across all markets. Argues that corporations urgently need to redefine how they build and manage brand equity along the supply chain. The management activities and competencies required to develop this new brand management process are described and future research directions signposted.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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Article

Christine Smith

In most organizations, the marketing department is one of the last areas to embrace enterprise technology. Tools and desktop applications have dominated the environment…

Abstract

In most organizations, the marketing department is one of the last areas to embrace enterprise technology. Tools and desktop applications have dominated the environment, but with the adoption of customer relationship management (CRM) systems and e‐mail marketing solutions, marketers are starting to see the benefits that large‐scale automation can bring, including increased efficiencies, more accurate reporting capabilities, and reduced costs. However, this is just the beginning. There are a few key marketing technologies that not only improve bottom line results, but also impact on the top line.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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