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Article

Jiaxun He and Cheng Lu Wang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of incorporating Chinese elements in global brands on consumer purchase likelihood.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of incorporating Chinese elements in global brands on consumer purchase likelihood.

Design/methodology/approach

Six global brand products from three categories that utilized Chinese elements are used to test hypotheses. The Total Effect Moderation Model is used to analyze by combining moderation and mediation under a general analytical framework.

Findings

The results show that cultural compatibility has direct positive effect, in addition to an indirect effect (through local iconness) on purchase likelihood. Meanwhile, consumer cultural identity is found to moderate the impact of brand local iconness on purchase likelihood.

Practical implications

Evaluation and improvement of cultural compatibility in a global brand that incorporates Chinese elements is recommended for multinational marketers entering Chinese consumer markets. Meanwhile, marketers should pay attention to consumer cultural identity in the market segmentation process.

Originality/value

This paper takes a unique perspective to investigate whether and how global brands can succeed when adding local cultural elements to the product design, packaging and promotion in emerging markets like China.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Ankur Srivastava, Dipanjan Kumar Dey and Balaji M.S.

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand credibility on purchase intentions toward global brands and domestic brands in an emerging market context. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand credibility on purchase intentions toward global brands and domestic brands in an emerging market context. It further examines three drivers of brand credibility: perceived globalness, perceived local iconness and perceived authenticity.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Systematic random sampling using the mall intercept technique was used to collect cross-sectional data from 836 customers in India. Hypotheses were tested by using structural equation modeling with AMOS 21.

Findings

The results demonstrate the significance of brand credibility on purchase intentions. Furthermore, brand globalness differentially influence brand credibility for global and domestic brands.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide key insights for marketers regarding consumer evaluation of global brands and domestic brands in emerging markets.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by proposing and testing the key role of brand credibility in consumer choice of global brands versus domestic brands in an emerging market context.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Yufan Li, Weichen Teng, Tien-Tien Liao and Tom M.Y. Lin

The recent rise of economic nationalism intensifies consumers' patriotic attitudes toward goods or services and thus encourages enterprises to build patriotic brand

Abstract

Purpose

The recent rise of economic nationalism intensifies consumers' patriotic attitudes toward goods or services and thus encourages enterprises to build patriotic brand images. Nevertheless, few studies have discussed how a patriotic brand image is developed. The purpose of this study aims to fill the gap by examining whether and how a positive corporate image helps a domestic brand establish a patriotic brand image and in turn enhances consumers' purchase intentions in relation to domestic brand products.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model identifying the antecedents of patriotic brand image (the components of corporate image) is proposed and empirically tested using structural equations with a questionnaire investigating Taiwanese college students' attitudes toward Taiwanese smartphone brands. Three competing models are also proposed and tested to confirm the appropriateness of the research model.

Findings

In addition to the widely recognized impact of perceived quality on purchase intentions, patriotic brand image is found to be effective in enhancing local consumers' intentions to purchase domestic brand products. To shape a patriotic brand image, perceived quality, perceived corporate ability and perceived corporate integrity are the direct approaches, while perceived corporate social responsibility works through perceived corporate integrity, and perceived employer brand enhances only perceived corporate social responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Potential sampling (college students) and subject (smartphones) biases may limit the generalizability of the presented findings

Practical implications

While patriotic appeals have long been used in marketing communication, they are also likely to precipitate negative brand associations (e.g. nationalism), offending consumers in other countries. By contrast, the development of a positive corporate image serves as an implicit and neutral approach to building a patriotic brand image and can help domestic brands attract local consumers with less harm to foreign markets.

Originality/value

This study is one of notably few studies discussing patriotic brand image and its impacts on purchase intentions. This study also identifies the antecedents of patriotic brand image and how each of them affects patriotic brand image. The findings can help guide domestic brands in building a patriotic brand image.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Haemoon Oh, Misoon Lee and Seonjeong Ally Lee

This study aims to investigate how and why traveling consumers choose globally branded/operated, instead of locally branded, hotels when traveling to another country.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how and why traveling consumers choose globally branded/operated, instead of locally branded, hotels when traveling to another country.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on signaling theory, the authors conceptualize a model to explain the consumer process of selecting global hotel brands and test the model empirically with South Korean international consumers through a self-administered survey.

Findings

The data support the relationships of selected brand signals, such as brand credibility, brand liability, decision heuristic and anticipated satisfaction, with brand attitude and purchase likelihood.

Practical implications

The results imply how global hotel brand managers could enhance the effect of global hotel branding on the consumer’s hotel choice.

Originality/value

The study adds to the literature by proposing a new, empirically supported model of global branding for the tourism and hospitality industry.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Weichen Teng

Although consumers’ tendency to support domestic companies by buying local products is growing, few studies discuss the corporate branding for domestic brands. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Although consumers’ tendency to support domestic companies by buying local products is growing, few studies discuss the corporate branding for domestic brands. This study aims to help domestic brands develop corporate branding strategies by examining the effects of corporate image of domestic brands on customers’ purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates various aspects of corporate image, including product quality, corporate ability, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and local-customer-first (a measure that is identified in this study). It conducts a survey (N = 283) and tests eight hypotheses with bivariate regression analyses with SPSS, Hayes’ PROCESS macro and structural equation modelling with AMOS to identify significant relationships.

Findings

The results show that all aspects of corporate image have significant positive effects on customers’ purchase intentions towards domestic brands. However, the effect of CSR image on purchase intention is fully mediated by the corporate ability and product quality images, whereas consumer ethnocentrism moderates the corporate ability and local-customer-first images.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by examining the effect of corporate image on customers’ domestic brand purchase intentions in emerging economies when the product quality image in the country is low. This study also identifies a new factor, local-customer-first, and its positive effect on purchase intention. It is recommended that domestic brands strengthen their CSR, corporate ability and local-customer-first images to gain local customers’ support. Furthermore, it is found that corporate ability and local-customer-first are more highly valued by ethnocentric consumers. These findings can help domestic brands develop corporate branding strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Michel Laroche, Rong Li, Marie-Odile Richard and Muxin Shao

This study aims to investigate how consumers respond to global brands adapting to local elements. Specifically, this study identified three factors (i.e., cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how consumers respond to global brands adapting to local elements. Specifically, this study identified three factors (i.e., cultural compatibility, cultural elements authenticity and cultural pride) affecting the purchase intentions (PIs) toward global brands using Chinese elements among Chinese consumers in China and Chinese immigrants in North America. Another aim is to examine the moderating role of acculturation in the relationship between cultural pride and PIs among Chinese immigrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted to test the hypotheses in China and North America. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the factor structure. Hierarchical regression was used to test the main effects and moderated regression analysis was used to test the moderation effect.

Findings

Results show that cultural compatibility, cultural elements authenticity (CEA) and cultural pride positively affect the PIs toward global brands with Chinese elements for both Chinese consumers and Chinese immigrants. Further, among Chinese immigrants, acculturation moderates the relationship between cultural pride and PIs.

Originality/value

This study explored the factors influencing the PIs toward global brands using Chinese elements, filling a research gap. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine how perceived CEA affects consumers’ PIs toward global brands with Chinese elements. Further, the findings have implications for global brands that want to target Chinese consumers and Chinese immigrants in overseas markets.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Weisha Wang, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Bang Nguyen and Paurav Shukla

With rising globalization, Western and Eastern brands are increasingly collaborating and co-branding. Drawing on the theory of dialectical self that captures the degree of…

Abstract

Purpose

With rising globalization, Western and Eastern brands are increasingly collaborating and co-branding. Drawing on the theory of dialectical self that captures the degree of cognitive tendency to tolerate conflicts, inconsistencies and ambiguities in self-concept, this paper investigates the effect of consumer dialectical self on co-branding that encompasses Western and East Asian cultural brand personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted using Chinese participants to examine the effects of the dialectical self on co-brand evaluation under single-and dual-personality conditions and to explore the mediating role of ideal social self-congruence and the moderating role of product type (high vs low conspicuous).

Findings

The findings suggest that counterintuitive to the received wisdom, the dialectical self negatively influences one's attitude towards a co-brand in the dual-personality condition only. Further, ideal social self-congruence mediates the relationship between the dialectical self and dual-personality co-brand evaluation in the high conspicuous product condition only.

Practical implications

Important implications are offered to international marketing managers for managing the dialectical self that lead to positive co-brand evaluations. Moreover, managers should highlight ideal social self-congruence for co-branding success for particular product types.

Originality/value

This paper examines co-branding from a novel perspective of consumer dialectical self and shows the pivotal role it plays when brands carry varying cultural traits engage in co-branding. By identifying the role of the dialectical self and the important mediator and moderator, the paper fulfils an important gap in co-branding literature and offers key implications.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Warat Winit, Gary Gregory, Mark Cleveland and Peeter Verlegh

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both geographical distribution and ownership. It examines main and interactive effects of consumers’ perceptions of these factors, and studies how ethnocentrism (CET) and price affect brand evaluations, considering a range of price difference thresholds.

Design/methodology/approach

A preliminary study (n=243) examined main and interaction effects of brand globalness and ownership on consumers’ brand quality attitudes and purchase intentions in four different product categories. The main study (n=558) further explored brand ownership effects by examining the interaction of CET and price differences.

Findings

The preliminary study confirmed the distinctiveness of brand globalness and ownership. Consumers evaluated global (vs non-global) brands more positively, regardless of brand ownership (local vs foreign). The main study found that effects of price and CET varied considerably across product categories.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of student samples from a single country (Thailand), and of scenarios instead of real life purchase decisions.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that perceived brand globalness positively impacts brand evaluations. Companies may cultivate a global brand image by emphasizing global cues. Local origin allows (global) brands to command a price premium, although this varies across product categories. An emphasis on globalness seems valuable, especially for local brands.

Originality/value

This research offers a refined conceptualization of brand globalness, a key construct in international marketing. Additional value is provided by studying price effects, which have received limited attention in international marketing, and substantial data collection (total N>800) in an understudied yet important economy (Thailand).

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part

Stanford A. Westjohn, Peter Magnusson and Joyce X. Zhou

The purpose of this study is to explore how the value of being global brands is experienced differently based upon foreign versus domestic origin of a brand. The…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore how the value of being global brands is experienced differently based upon foreign versus domestic origin of a brand. The conceptual framework is tested on samples from three countries – United States, India, and China. The data are analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling. The belief that global brands are of higher quality, more socially responsible, and deliver a sense of belongingness to a global community led to an orientation toward globally available consumption alternatives, or global consumption orientation (GCO). High GCO has been associated with preferences for global brands; however, we find that while this preference indeed extends to global brands based in foreign countries, it does not extend to global brands based in the home country. The study of global brands seldom distinguishes among types of global brands. This research examines global brands based on their foreign versus domestic origin; thus it offers a more nuanced understanding of the boundaries for the value of global brands.

Details

Entrepreneurship in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-448-1

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