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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Muhammad Azeem Abro, Rohaizat Baharun and Ahsan Zubair

This study aims to investigate the impact of consumer advocacy on community usefulness and brand avoidance. Moreover, the study scrutinizes the mediating role and impact…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of consumer advocacy on community usefulness and brand avoidance. Moreover, the study scrutinizes the mediating role and impact of organizational feedback/response and moderating role of information credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The explanatory and cross-sectional research design was used in the study. Primary data were collected from broadband internet users and 249 responses gathered across the country. The study sample comprises of individuals sharing unfavorable service experiences on social media.

Findings

The key findings of the study highlight that consumer advocacy is a type of complaining method, which is used to help other society members; hence, there is a strong relationship among consumer’s advocacy and society’s usefulness. Brand avoidance is the outcome of stronger reactions by consumer advocates and through efficient organizational feedback, the impact of advocacy can be mitigated. Moreover, the study found that effective organizational explanations can be a useful remedy to brand avoidance. Furthermore, the research revealed that information credibility does not moderate the relationship between consumer advocacy and brand avoidance.

Practical implications

The study findings will help practitioners in determining effective strategies to restrict and control brand avoidance.

Originality/value

The social side of consumer argumentative behavior is still an under-research area, which is addressed in the paper. This is the unique study, which explores the mediating impact of organizational feedback on consumer advocacy, brand avoidance and usefulness for society in the implicit perspective.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Zana Knittel, Karolin Beurer and Adele Berndt

The purpose of this research is to explore the reasons for brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers. Researchers have traditionally focused on the positive…

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5620

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the reasons for brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers. Researchers have traditionally focused on the positive relationship between consumers and brands, but, increasingly, consumers are consciously avoiding brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study consisting of both focus groups and interviews was conducted among Generation Y participants.

Findings

The findings support previous research that identifies four types of brand avoidance, namely, experiential, identity, moral and deficit-value avoidance. However, the study also suggests that an additional type of brand avoidance, namely, advertising avoidance, also occurs. Aspects of advertising that can contribute to brand avoidance include the content of the advertising, the use of a celebrity endorser and the music in the advertising, as well as the response to the advertising. This study thus proposes an expanded framework of brand avoidance.

Research limitations/implications

This study has found support for the existing types and reasons impacting brand avoidance but suggests that advertising may also impact brand avoidance. This is an aspect that requires further research.

Practical implications

For marketing managers, the findings suggest that not only can product experiences result in brand avoidance, but that advertising may be a further reason for this phenomenon.

Originality/value

While there has been a great deal of attention on the positive aspects of brands, research on the negative aspects has largely been ignored. Further, the identification of advertising as a reason for brand avoidance is also suggested.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2017

K.R. Jayasimha, Harish Chaudhary and Anurag Chauhan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioral outcomes and effectiveness of organizational response to open complaints by consumers following a dissatisfactory…

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1546

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioral outcomes and effectiveness of organizational response to open complaints by consumers following a dissatisfactory service experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Three natural communities (WhatsApp groups) were used with reference to online food and grocery retailing. The respondents comprised community members sharing negative experiences on the group. A scenario implanted in a survey was used as the research approach.

Findings

Consumer advocacy, a form of complaining, is a way to help other community members. The relationship between consumer advocacy and community usefulness strengthens the argument of consumers’ collective concern as one of the motivational frames for consumer advocacy. Consumer advocates show stronger reactions, resulting in brand avoidance following voice complaining. An effective organizational response can mitigate brand avoidance.

Practical implications

Finding ways to restrict and alleviate brand avoidance is an area that is of major interest to practitioners. The study finds that prospective explanations could be a very effective antidote to brand avoidance.

Originality/value

The social side of complaining is a relatively under-researched area. This study examines the relationship between consumer advocacy, community usefulness and brand avoidance. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the moderating effect of organizational response on consumer advocacy and its outcomes in the virtual context.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

Tore Strandvik, Anne Rindell and Kristoffer Wilén

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical consumers' brand avoidance. The study contributes to brand-avoidance research by exploring what role consumers' ethical…

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4264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical consumers' brand avoidance. The study contributes to brand-avoidance research by exploring what role consumers' ethical concerns play in their brand avoidance.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is adopted by interviewing 15 active members of organizations that represent ethical concerns for the well-being of animals, the environment and humans.

Findings

The study indicates that consumers with a strong value-based perspective on consumption (such as ethical consumers) may reject brands in two different but interrelated ways. In essence, the study reveals characteristics of brand avoidance that have not been discussed in earlier research, in terms of two dimensions: persistency (persistent vs temporary) and explicitness (explicit vs latent).

Practical implications

The study shows the importance of considering the phenomenon of brand avoidance, as it may reveal fundamental challenges in the market. These challenges may relate to consumer values that have not been regarded as important or that have been thought of as relating only to a specific group of consumers.

Originality/value

The ethical consumers' views represent new insights into understanding brand avoidance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Adele Berndt, Daniel J. Petzer and Pierre Mostert

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into brand avoidance of service brands and explore whether the different types of brand avoidance identified in a product…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into brand avoidance of service brands and explore whether the different types of brand avoidance identified in a product context apply to service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the exploratory nature of the study, the critical incident method and semi-structured interviews were used to achieve the purpose of the study.

Findings

The findings suggest that five types of brand avoidance, as identified in studies involving product brands, can be identified as impacting service brands. In addition, the findings show that advertising avoidance should be expanded to communication avoidance because of the multifarious communication influences that were identified. The study proposes a framework to deepen the understanding of the types of brand avoidance affecting service brands.

Research limitations/implications

Since the different types of brand avoidance previously identified are also evident in a services environment, service providers should develop strategies to deal with the different types of service brand avoidance. The findings are broad in scope because of the exploratory nature of the study, and a detailed analysis of each type of service brand avoidance is still required.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the various types of brand avoidance and their manifestation in the services context. The study contributes by showing that the broader concept of communication, not only advertising, should be considered when studying brand avoidance in a service context.

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Anne Rindell, Tore Strandvik and Kristoffer Wilén

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical consumers' brand avoidance. The study contributes to brand-avoidance research by exploring what role consumers' ethical…

Downloads
5985

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical consumers' brand avoidance. The study contributes to brand-avoidance research by exploring what role consumers' ethical concerns play in their brand avoidance.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is adopted by interviewing 15 active members of organizations that represent ethical concerns for the well-being of animals, the environment and humans.

Findings

The study indicates that consumers with a strong value-based perspective on consumption (such as ethical consumers) may reject brands in two different but interrelated ways. In essence, the study reveals characteristics of brand avoidance that have not been discussed in earlier research, in terms of two dimensions: persistency (persistent vs temporary) and explicitness (explicit vs latent).

Practical implications

The study shows the importance of considering the phenomenon of brand avoidance, as it may reveal fundamental challenges in the market. These challenges may relate to consumer values that have not been regarded as important or that have been thought of as relating only to a specific group of consumers.

Originality/value

The ethical consumers' views represent new insights into understanding brand avoidance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Raphael Odoom, John Paul Kosiba, Christian Tetteh Djamgbah and Linda Narh

The increased practitioner and academic interest in negative brand phenomena highlight the need for the development of practical scales to be used for empirical…

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1055

Abstract

Purpose

The increased practitioner and academic interest in negative brand phenomena highlight the need for the development of practical scales to be used for empirical investigations. Therefore, this paper aims to draw on existing conceptualisations to provide a theoretically grounded yet practically oriented scale for examining brand avoidance and its protocols.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a sample of 575 consumers from two developing countries to create a parsimonious brand avoidance scale. Partial least squares structural equation modelling is used to analyse the data through a systematic formative measurement approach

Findings

This paper finds brand avoidance to be a multidimensional, second-order construct with five first-order dimensions: moral avoidance, identity avoidance, deficit–value avoidance, experiential avoidance and advertising-related avoidance. The paper further validates this scale by testing with non-purchase intention and identifies its positive relationship with brand avoidance.

Originality/value

This study fulfils the calls in the literature to provide a measurable scale for studying negative brand phenomena in consumer–brand relationship research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Muhammad Asif Khan, Rohail Ashraf and Aneela Malik

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of identity-based consumer perceptions on the brand avoidance of foreign brands across multiple markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of identity-based consumer perceptions on the brand avoidance of foreign brands across multiple markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on general product category brands, the study was conducted across two countries, i.e. New Zealand (Study 1) and Pakistan (Study 2), using online surveys. Study 1 explores the perceptions of university students, whereas Study 2 evaluates the perceptions of a more heterogeneous population across the country. Partial least squares–structural equation modelling was used to analyse the model.

Findings

First, the results confirm that individual-level identity-based drivers (undesired self-congruence and negative social influence) consistently predict brand avoidance for foreign brands across both markets, whereas country-level drivers (consumer ethnocentrism and animosity) have inconsistent effects across the markets. Second, the study demonstrates that avoidance attitude fully mediates the relationship between antecedences and intentions to avoid foreign brands.

Practical implications

The finding that undesired self-congruence is the strongest predictor of brand avoidance across the markets reinforces the importance of brand image congruence with the target audience. Considering the negative effect of social influence, especially on social media (i.e. Facebook and Twitter), this finding cautions managers to constantly monitor the prevailing negative word of mouth (online or offline) about the brand to mitigate its potential effect.

Originality/value

Drawing on social identity theory, this study explores the identity-based pre-purchase determinants of brand avoidance at the country level and at the individual level. These determinants have never been explored yet in the context of brand avoidance.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Olavo Pinto and Amélia Brandão

The purpose of this study is to place the antecedents and consequences of brand hate in the context of negative consumer–brand relationship in the telecommunication…

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2768

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to place the antecedents and consequences of brand hate in the context of negative consumer–brand relationship in the telecommunication industry. It provides a response to the existing gap in the research on brand hate in consumer behavior in service brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based data was modeled after theory that aims to apply concepts to the telecommunications industry. With a solid model grounded and context-adapted, a mediation analysis of the role of brand hate in negative antecedents and consequences toward brands was performed.

Findings

Brand hate was found to mediate all the negative relationships proposed, while showing to be especially significant in mediating negative word of mouth. This model appropriately fits the services' marketing brand and revealed new insights into the function of brand hate in negative relationships that are specific to service marketing consumer brands.

Research limitations/implications

Branding theory may benefit from deeper insights into the negative side of consumer–brand relationships. A broader illustration of its constituents in different industries and the recovery of the management approach to these circumstances bring innovation and a richer understanding, specially to the role of brand hate in the mediation context as seen in the literature (Hegner et al., 2017; Zarantonello et al., 2016)

Practical implications

Managerial implications include assessing brands in analyzing and relating to different emotions and concepts from customers, allowing to prioritize and mapping the customer relationship touchpoints.

Originality/value

The present study presents a first insight of brand hate in the context of the service industry of telecommunications in southern Europe while testing brand hate as a mediator involving negative predictors leading to negative outcomes in consumer–brand relationships.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Hyunsook Kim, Ho Jung Choo and Namhee Yoon

This study aims to investigate the conceptual structure of fast fashion avoidance among young consumers in Korea. The effects of negative beliefs on the behavioural…

Downloads
18582

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the conceptual structure of fast fashion avoidance among young consumers in Korea. The effects of negative beliefs on the behavioural intention regarding fast fashion avoidance are empirically examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of fast fashion avoidance is proposed and tested based on the literature and blog analyses. Web‐based online survey data are analyzed by second‐order factor analysis and hierarchical regression.

Findings

The second‐order structure of eight negative beliefs is statistically supported. Among these negative beliefs, poor performance and deindividuation have positive effects on fast fashion avoidance. While inauthenticity has a negative effect, big store discomfort and foreignness have an interaction effect with regards to the lack of alternatives.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on convenient sampling of young female adults. However, it is tested in Korea, of which global fast fashion retailing is in its growing stage.

Originality/value

This study represents a new attempt to apply the concept of brand avoidance to an explanation of fast fashion avoidance, and test it using empirically‐collected survey data.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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