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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Linn Viktoria Rampl and Peter Kenning

The importance of employer branding to attract talent in organizations is increasing rapidly. Brand personality traits, particularly, have been shown to explain…

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Abstract

Purpose

The importance of employer branding to attract talent in organizations is increasing rapidly. Brand personality traits, particularly, have been shown to explain considerable variance in employer brand attractiveness. Despite such awareness, little is known about the underlying processes of this effect. The purpose of the authors is to close the research gap by drawing on a consumer brand model of brand affect and trust as a means of explaining employer brand attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Students interested in working in the consultancy industry completed a survey designed to evaluate consultancy employer brands. Established scales for brand personality, trust, and affect, and employer brand attractiveness were used to test the conceptual model.

Findings

The results indicate that employer brand trust and affect are both influenced by the brand personality trait sincerity. Further, employer brand affect was positively affected by the traits excitement and sophistication, while negatively affected by ruggedness. Together, employer brand affect and trust explain 71 per cent of the variance in employer brand attractiveness.

Research limitations/implications

While the results show the importance of branding an organization as a sincere, exciting, and sophisticated employer, future research is needed to identify adequate marketing tools to achieve this goal, also in other industries besides the one investigated here.

Originality/value

This study is the first to apply a model that includes brand personality, trust, and affect to employer branding. By doing so, the variance explained in employer brand attractiveness could be increased substantially.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Sung Ho Han, Bang Nguyen and Lyndon Simkin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dynamic process and the meaning of symbolic consumption according to the three symbolic needs (i.e. status needs, social…

2761

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dynamic process and the meaning of symbolic consumption according to the three symbolic needs (i.e. status needs, social needs, status and social needs) to understand how symbolic messages are conveyed when consumers choose a brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops three dynamic models, categorized according to the consumers’ needs. The conceptual framework consists of the six constructs: collectivism/individualism, brand reputation, self-congruence, brand affect, brand identification and brand loyalty. Twelve hypotheses were developed and tested. Data were collected from consumers who had experienced well-known global chain restaurant brands. The three models were tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Findings highlight the important mediating role of brand affect in symbolic consumption, which previously has not been revealed empirically. Moreover, it is found that self-congruence does not mediate the relationship between brand reputation, collectivism/individualism and brand affect, despite its prominence in previous symbolic consumption studies. In the status and social needs models, brand reputation mediates between collectivism/individualism and self-congruence, brand identification, brand affect and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical paper to investigate symbolic consumption in the context of three types of models, according to symbolic needs, in the context of restaurant consumption. The study also identifies the major components of the consumer’s symbolic needs based on the attributes of symbolic consumption. Moreover, this study reveals that when both social needs and status needs are mixed, a hierarchy exists between consumers’ symbolic needs. Finally, the study makes an important contribution to the literature by applying the concept of brand affect to symbolic consumption research and exploring the relationships between the external motivational factors and the internal elements of symbolic consumption.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2018

Abhigyan Sarkar, Juhi Gahlot Sarkar, Sreejesh S. and Anusree M.R.

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate various factors associated with e-tail store brand affect.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate various factors associated with e-tail store brand affect.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by conducting semi-structured depth interviews following a storytelling approach. The data were coded using the grounded theory method.

Findings

Data analysis shows that anticipated service recovery, deal attractiveness and luxury e-tail brand image predict e-tail store brand affect. These predictors play their roles under the moderating influences of specific moderators. The desirable marketing outcomes of e-tail store brand affect are e-tail branded app usage, spreading positive word of mouth and secure attachment style toward e-tailer.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies in developing a grounded theory based causal process model that can provide managerial insights on how to enhance e-tail brand affect.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Cochen Wu and Yung‐Chien Yen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the strength of brand associations, different brand breadths, and the similarity between a parent brand's product categories…

6442

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the strength of brand associations, different brand breadths, and the similarity between a parent brand's product categories and its extension product categories influence consumers' attitudes toward brand extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental research design was applied to testing the set of hypotheses. A total of 384 respondents participated in the main study. This study analyzed experimental results using analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Findings

The paper finds that when a brand is extended to similar product categories, only when the association is strong (trust or affect) will consumers prefer the extension of the narrow brand to that of the broad brand. Conversely, when a brand is extended to dissimilar product categories, regardless of the brand associations (trust or affect), consumers prefer the extension of the favorable broad brand to that of the narrow brand.

Practical implications

For corporations that operate within a narrow brand, brand extension strategies must be based on parent brand associations (trust or affect) that are very strong. In addition, the extension must only be to extremely similar product categories. In contrast, for corporations operating a broad brand, although the chance of brand extension success is better, favorability of consumer brand association (trust or affect) must never be ignored.

Originality/value

The study results reemphasize the importance of brand breadth effects when launching category extensions. Also, the research provides new insight into the strength of parent brand associations when evaluating consumers' brand attitude on brand extension.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Won-Moo Hur, Seongho Kang and Minsung Kim

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of customer-brand relationships in the international marketplace, and empirically investigates and compares the…

8401

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of customer-brand relationships in the international marketplace, and empirically investigates and compares the customer-brand relationship development process between Indian and Chinese markets. In detail, four out of Hofstede’s original five national culture dimensions were adopted as moderators in the process of customer-brand relationship development between two markets.

Design/methodology/approach

To test hypotheses, responses from 539 Indian and 400 Chinese mobile phone consumer samples were achieved, and the proposed model was estimated by using structural equations based on the partial least squares algorithm.

Findings

The results demonstrate that utilitarian value and brand affect play a significant role in building brand loyalty for Chinese consumers, while hedonic value and perceived risk contribute more in building brand loyalty for Indian consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This study indicated that the cultural difference affects both on brand trust formation and on the relationship between brand trust/affect and brand loyalty, implying that more customized brand management strategies should be adopted.

Practical implications

Global brand values must be communicated for each culture appropriately. It is desirable that the identified match, utilitarian value-Chinese customers and hedonic value-Indian customers, be consistently presented to each cultural market in a more integrative manner.

Originality/value

This study identified that the route from the development of value proposition to building up brand trust and brand affect is a critical step toward achieving brand loyalty in Indian and Chinese markets.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Xin Liu, Michael Y. Hu and Pamela E. Grimm

The goal of the paper is to examine the affect transfer process of the brand extension by developing a conceptual framework that integrates two factors important to this…

2518

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of the paper is to examine the affect transfer process of the brand extension by developing a conceptual framework that integrates two factors important to this process: the expectancy and relevancy of brand extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies with a sample of 250 respondents provide empirical support that both expectancy and relevancy positively influence the affect transfer process.

Findings

The study first tests both factors at the product level as well as at the product attribute level. The two factors enhance the affect transfer process in different manners. Expectancy facilitates the transfer from the parent product category to the extension, whereas relevancy enhances the transfer from the brand associations to the extension product. The greatest affect transfer occurs when both factors are present.

Originality/value

The study proposes a theoretical framework that for the first time integrates the two main streams of literature in brand extensions. The proposed framework explains the affect transfer process in brand extensions, and helps understand consumers' attitude towards brand extension products.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Richard Lee and Marc Mazodier

This paper aims to examine the impacts of consumer ethnocentrism, animosity and cosmopolitanism on the effects of sponsorships on brand affect and brand trust, using…

2311

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impacts of consumer ethnocentrism, animosity and cosmopolitanism on the effects of sponsorships on brand affect and brand trust, using latent growth modelling (LGM) to disentangle the static and dynamic components of brand affect and brand trust.

Design/methodology/approach

An online panel of UK participants reported their perceptions of a French sponsor at three successive points (before, during and at the end of the 2012 London Olympics). Of the 903 respondents at T1, 694 remained at T2 (76.8 per cent) and 577 (63.9 per cent) remained at T3. Another 302 respondents only at T3 controlled for potential mere measurement effects. The data were analysed using LGM techniques.

Findings

Due to sponsorship effects, brand affect and brand trust increased linearly over time. However, consumer ethnocentrism and animosity negatively moderated these increases. Cosmopolitanism enhanced brand affect but not brand trust.

Research limitations/implications

As market globalisation exposes foreign firms to potential backlash from consumer nationalistic orientations towards their products, sponsorship strategies must consider the interplay between these nationalistic sentiments and sponsorship effects. While foreign sponsors are typically preoccupied with determining the fit between their brand and a local event, they must also consider individual-level nationalistic sentiments. The success of companies in foreign markets depends on creating favourable country-directed consumer attitudes.

Originality/value

Beyond demonstrating the application of LGM to individual-level longitudinal analyses, this study extends sponsorship research by considering a previously unexplored area with key academic and managerial contributions, namely, the role of consumer nationalism in sponsorship effects. The strategic uses and outcomes of international sponsorship must be considered in conjunction with consumers’ perceptions of foreign brands from a nationalistic perspective.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Justin F. McManus, Sergio W. Carvalho and Valerie Trifts

This study aims to explore the role of brand personality traits in explaining how different levels of brand favorability evoke affect from and forge connections to consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of brand personality traits in explaining how different levels of brand favorability evoke affect from and forge connections to consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a quantitative approach consisting of within-subjects (Study 1) and between-subjects (Study 2) experimental designs. Mediation analyses were tested using OLS regression with the MEMORE and PROCESS macros.

Findings

Findings suggest increases in brand excitement and sincerity to be related to differences in positive affect evoked by favorable and unfavorable brands; decreases in brand sincerity to be related to differences in negative affect between favorable and unfavorable brands (Study 1); brand competence and excitement to be related to the relationship between brand favorability and self-brand connection; and brand competence and excitement to best distinguish favorable brands from unfavorable brands (Study 2).

Originality/value

These results support the importance of brand personality traits that are considered to be universally positive and provide managers with an initial roadmap for which brand personality traits should be prioritized when communicating with consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Jingjing Guan, Wanfei Wang, Zhigang Guo, Jin Hooi Chan and Xiaoguang Qi

This study aims to propose a comprehensive causal model to examine the relationships between customer experience and four key factors in brand building, i.e., brand

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a comprehensive causal model to examine the relationships between customer experience and four key factors in brand building, i.e., brand loyalty, brand trust, brand affect and brand involvement. The dimensionality of customer experience in full-service hotel is also particularly examined in relation to brand building.

Design/methodology/approach

Three steps of data collection were used: interviews of 50 customers on their experiences of staying full-service hotels, a small survey of 176 hotel guests to establish the measurement scale of customer experience and a major survey of 732 hotel customers in ten major Chinese cities to test the model of brand loyalty.

Findings

Customers’ experiences with full-service hotels are proposed to be categorized into functional, affective and social. There is a chain effect from customer experience to brand trust and to brand affect and then to brand loyalty. The brand involvement does moderate relationships between customer experience and brand trust and brand affect but not brand loyalty.

Practical implications

For full-service hotels, social and functional experiences are critical in building brand loyalty, and therefore, they need to be the focal points in the enhancement of customer experience. Also, hoteliers are advised to develop emotional connections between the customers and the hotel brand – an effective way of building trust and affection.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge, this paper is one of the first few studies to link customer experience to brand loyalty with comprehensive causal effect analysis. This study also contributes to the knowledge of customer experience in the context of the full-service hotel sector.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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