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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Thi Song Hanh Pham, Lien Le Monkhouse and Bradley R. Barnes

Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the influence of relational capability and marketing capabilities on export performance. The…

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1587

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the influence of relational capability and marketing capabilities on export performance. The study also examines the interaction effects of relational capability on the marketing capabilities – export performance relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A stratified random sample of 1,047 exporting firms was approached. Survey data were collected from 333 Vietnamese exporting firms and analysed using hierarchical moderated regression.

Findings

The results reveal that a firm’s relational capability not only strengthens the efficiency of the export pricing capability – performance, marketing intelligence capability – performance, and marketing communication capability – performance relationships, but is also the strongest predictor of export performance amongst those capabilities identified. Whilst engagement in market intelligence, product development, price setting and promotional activities have a positive payoff, the findings confirm that there is less need for exporters to engage in after-sales service and distribution capabilities.

Originality/value

The study introduces the notion of relational capability alongside export marketing capabilities as predictors of export performance. The authors also examine the moderating influence of relational capability on the link between export marketing capabilities and export performance. By focusing on Vietnam, the study provides fresh insights surrounding the development pathway for firms in emerging markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Shiu Fai Chan, Bradley R. Barnes and Kyoko Fukukawa

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a new conceptual model in an online service context. The model focuses on an important, yet often neglected…

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2005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a new conceptual model in an online service context. The model focuses on an important, yet often neglected customer-oriented construct, i.e., user “control”, which is embedded in consumer behaviour when accessing the internet. The study examines the relationship between control, online dependency, online encounter satisfaction and overall satisfaction. It explains the strategic implications surrounding customer control and online dependency as means for enhancing customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed drawing on a combination of existing and new measurement items for the constructs in question. The instrument was later pilot tested on two consecutive occasions ahead of the main survey. A random sample of Hong Kong banking consumers was approached and interviews were undertaken via telephone. The data were analysed via confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses relating to the model.

Findings

The findings reveal positive relationships between control and online dependency, and control and online encounter satisfaction. Meanwhile control, online dependency and online encounter satisfaction lead to overall satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study proposes a counterintuitive argument that while online service customers gain control of the online service process, they become more dependent on it, and their control and dependency also lead to their satisfaction, at both the online service encounter level and corporate level. Drawing on the pertinent literature, this is the first study to examine the importance of two information system constructs, i.e., control and online dependency, as predictors of consumer psychological fulfilment, i.e., satisfaction. The findings confirm that control as an initiator and driver of customer satisfaction in an online context, and online encounter satisfaction, further contributes to overall satisfaction at the corporate level.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Ahmed Shaalan, Marwa Tourky, Bradley R. Barnes, Chanaka Jayawardhena and Ibrahim Elshaer

This study aims to examine the Arab practice of wasta (personal networks) and its potential interface with relationship marketing to enable firms to optimize their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the Arab practice of wasta (personal networks) and its potential interface with relationship marketing to enable firms to optimize their recruitment and retention of customers in societies where personal ties drive business relationships. It explores whether relationship marketing influences customer retention when a personal contact leaves.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were gathered from 305 customers introduced to Egyptian small and medium-sized enterprises via wasta. Multiple-item scales were adopted, drawn from previous empirical studies. Quantitative analysis was used, including confirmatory factor analysis. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships posited.

Findings

Wasta plays a significant role in attracting customers, nurturing early relationships and enhancing relationship quality, but does not influence the retention of customers. Practicing relationship marketing post wasta can enhance customer loyalty, even if the business was developed through the wasta contact who left to join a rival firm.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations arise from cultural differences in other Middle Eastern countries. Future studies could also validate the results in different sectors/industries and explore managers and employees’ perspectives.

Practical implications

Several recommendations emerge for managerial practitioners, including the use of wasta to attract business, but more significantly, the need for the effective use of relationship marketing to retain business. The study suggests that if relationship marketing is practiced well, customers are likely to remain loyal to the firm, even if the business was developed through a personal wasta relationship with an employee who subsequently moved to a competitor firm.

Originality/value

This study is the first to develop a unified model connecting the Eastern notion of wasta (personal ties) with relationship marketing. The study enhances the knowledge of wasta and relationship marketing. It is among the first to suggest that should employees with personal connections to customers leave to join a competing firm, there is still a strong likelihood that if relationship marketing is effectively practiced, then customers will remain loyal to the firm (rather than to the former employee).

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Ron Berger, Bradley R. Barnes and Avi Silbiger

Managers of multinational enterprises (MNEs) from developed economies are often cautious to understand the cultural environment where they do business. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

Managers of multinational enterprises (MNEs) from developed economies are often cautious to understand the cultural environment where they do business. This is predominantly true in developing economies, and even more so in certain Arab countries where MNEs have limited knowledge and experience. The purpose of this study is to report on the development of a research instrument that is applicable to Arab business culture, following the 2011 Arab Spring. The investigation draws on data from three different groups of people, i.e. leaders (business professors and leading politicians), business people and postgraduate business students, all of Palestinian nationality. The article examines the Arabic culturally based business structure called Wasta, a system that relies on social networks and the reciprocal exchange of favors. A research instrument is developed to measure three dimensions of Wasta across these three different groups of people and examines their influence on relationship satisfaction and organizational performance. The findings reveal that the groups are affected differently by these dimensions and see different utility in Wasta. Such insights may be useful for MNE practitioners when entering Arab countries, when seeking to employ younger Arabs and when partnering with Arab businesses or dealing with government officials.

Design/methodology/approach

Research paper

Findings

This study has focused on the impact of Wasta on relationship satisfaction and on relationship performance for three different groups of individuals: business people, students and leaders. It was hypothesized that higher levels of each component of Wasta would contribute positively to relationship satisfaction, and that the latter would in turn lead to higher relationship performance. Findings generally supported these hypotheses with some variations among groups. Furthermore, it was predicted that the model would be relevant to all three groups, but would be structured differently reflecting their different views of business. The findings of this study help answer our research question about the socio-economic, cultural and political factors that influence the business process involving Arab and non-Arab business managers.

Originality/value

Original paper

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2021

Cheng Lu Wang, Dorothy Yen and Bradley R. Barnes

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Ram Herstein, Netanel Drori, Ron Berger and Bradley R. Barnes

Private-label goods are now available in more than 55 countries worldwide and their total sales value is estimated to be in excess of one trillion US dollars. The…

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1176

Abstract

Purpose

Private-label goods are now available in more than 55 countries worldwide and their total sales value is estimated to be in excess of one trillion US dollars. The prevalence of such goods, however, drastically differs across countries. Whilst market share in some developed economies exceeds 50 percent, penetration appears much lower in emerging economies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate marketing issues surrounding such low-penetration levels in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with: 36 store managers and the marketing director of a large emerging market retail chain.

Findings

Eight factors were found to impede the retail chain’s vision regarding implementation of the private branding strategy.

Practical implications

Several implications are extracted from the study, mainly in the context of emerging markets that managers should consider in order to improve their private branding strategies.

Originality/value

Although some research has aimed to shed light concerning the significance of private brands from retailers’ perspectives, such research has not tended to address the issue of how to implement private brand strategies in emerging markets. To bridge the gap, this study investigates these issues from a retail chain management perspective in order to potentially leverage performance advantages associated with the nurturing of private-label branded goods.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Qionglei Yu, Bradley R. Barnes and Yu Ye

Through undertaking qualitative research within different industrial contexts, the study aims to address the following: How do practitioners in non-service organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

Through undertaking qualitative research within different industrial contexts, the study aims to address the following: How do practitioners in non-service organisations interpret internal market orientation (IMO); How is IMO practiced within an eastern cultural context; and What are the outcomes of its implementation?

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines three organisations from three different industries and draws on nine in-depth interviews with people across various levels within each organisation.

Findings

The study reveals that: a) senior management commitment should be included in the design of IMO at the strategic level; b) effective responsiveness to internal information collected is crucial to its success; c) creative ways to meet internal customers’ needs and expectations are contextualised; and d) cultural nuances need to be considered when applying IMO.

Research limitations/implications

Choosing a multiple-case study approach provides in-depth explanations; however, such an approach may lead to less generalisability.

Practical implications

The study advocates that a) some degree of resources are needed to ensure that IMO can be fully implemented and employee welfare enhanced; b) creativity is required for each organisational context responding to employees’ needs, expectations, complaints or ideas; and c) removing unnecessary barriers can help to foster better interdepartmental relationships and, thus, improve work procedures and employee satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by developing a framework to signal the importance of IMO as a facilitator for better firm communication and performance. Contextualised IMO practices from the cases may shed further light on specific best practice.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Bradley R. Barnes

The paper reports on an exploratory study aimed at analysing a series of independent variables derived from international industrial marketing and channel management literature.

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1050

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports on an exploratory study aimed at analysing a series of independent variables derived from international industrial marketing and channel management literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents represent a number of dyadic business‐to‐business relationships of different duration, and involve firms of different size (multinational enterprise buyers and their corresponding medium sized enterprise suppliers).

Findings

Initial findings support much of the extant literature on relationship marketing, demonstrating that certain aspects of a relationship tend to change over time. In particular, the study revealed that: there is a high degree of optimism associated with dyadic relationships at early stages, and these are characterised by both parties having high initial perceptions of the relationship; in mid‐term relationships some negativity maybe apparent, where certain aspects regress; and in long‐term situations, there is a tendency for relationships to be well structured, and these are particularly highly perceived among both exchange parties.

Research limitations/implications

The research approach shares those benefits as well as limitations associated with earlier empirical investigations. That is a trade‐off in favour of undertaking dyadic exploration, than administering large samples and data sets. As a consequence of the sample size, some caution should be exercised when interpreting these findings.

Practical implications

Firms need to pay particular attention to relationships of differing time duration. This is because specific aspects of relationships may not develop in a uniform direction.

Originality/value

The research attempts to unravel the complexities and difficulties associated with obtaining data of a dyadic perspective for a significant number of relationships of different length. Such studies that map the evolvement of buyer‐seller relations over time are rare.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Lien Le Monkhouse, Bradley R. Barnes and Ute Stephan

The paper aims to further extend our understanding by assessing the extent to which two prominent cultural values in East Asia i.e. face saving and group orientation drive…

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9516

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to further extend our understanding by assessing the extent to which two prominent cultural values in East Asia i.e. face saving and group orientation drive consumers’ perceptions of luxury goods across four East Asian markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐methods research approach was adopted consisting of: an expert panel of close to 70 participants, group discussions with five extended East Asian families, personal interviews with eight East Asian scholars, a pilot test with over 50 East Asian graduate students and a multi‐market survey of 443 consumer respondents in Beijing, Tokyo, Singapore and Hanoi.

Findings

The authors extend previous conceptual studies by empirically investigating the impact of these two cultural values on the perception of luxury among East Asian societies. Specifically the study reveals that across all four markets face saving has the strongest influence on the conspicuous and hedonistic dimensions of luxury, group orientation meanwhile is the strongest predictor of the quality, extended self and exclusivity dimensions of luxury. Collectively these two cultural values significantly influence East Asian perceptions of luxury. Overall, the findings reiterate the importance of understanding different cultural values and their influence across different East Asian societies.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for managers of western luxury branded goods that are seeking to penetrate East Asian markets or seek to serve East Asian consumers. Specifically, to assist with developing suitable brand positioning, products, services, communications and pricing strategies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to our understanding of the subject by exploring the impact of face saving and group orientation on the perception of luxury goods across four East Asian countries. Several directions for future research are suggested.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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