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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Bradley Jorgensen

In recent years there has been discussion in the management and organisational literature on generational differences and how they may impact on the design of workforce…

20553

Abstract

In recent years there has been discussion in the management and organisational literature on generational differences and how they may impact on the design of workforce strategies. However, much of the discussion appears to be based on observation rather than large empirical work. Indeed, I would argue that wider support for the requirement to manage the workforce around X and Y issues is absent. For example, employers of choice are looking to win talent by tailoring employment policy to capture the dynamism of the modern era rather than discrete generational values. Significantly, the bulk of generational data cited by popular writers is subjective, non‐representative, makes use of single‐point‐of‐time data and uses retrospective comparisons. Importantly, scholarly literature does not draw arbitrary and abrupt lines between generations. In seeking to determine a preferred workforce strategy organisations would be better served by acknowledging the technical, economic, political and social dynamism of modern life rather than the flawed conclusions of popular generational literature.

Details

Foresight, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Bradley Jorgensen

Discusses how public sector organisations should respond to emerging social and demographic trends, the changing nature of work set against the context of globalisation, the…

3024

Abstract

Discusses how public sector organisations should respond to emerging social and demographic trends, the changing nature of work set against the context of globalisation, the knowledge economy and the influence of information and communication technologies. Argues that the new ways of doing things, which emphasise collaborative action and learning, mandates the adoption of a high performance governance model instead of “command‐based” management. Proposes an integrated parcel of workforce strategies that supports organisational change, addresses noted social and demographic trends, builds social and human capital, recognises the value of life‐long‐learning, accommodates the rise of Self, embraces flexibility and provides for quality employment and tailored opportunities for the public sector's diverse workforce as the preferred corporate policy option.

Details

Foresight, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Bradley Jorgensen

Proposes the adoption of six strategic objectives around which to build a workforce policy architecture for the future.

6212

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes the adoption of six strategic objectives around which to build a workforce policy architecture for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from a review of the literature, this paper investigates a workforce policy response to emerging social and demographic trends, forecast workforce shortages, ongoing and rapid change, the growth in complexity and the changing nature of work.

Findings

A workforce model that supports organizational growth and development, characterised by attributes that are associated with knowledge society work is proposed. These include: trends that alter the balance of the social structure; social and human capital growth; lifelong learning; a policy emphasis on the self; workplace flexibility; and the development of an organizational identity as a preferred corporate employer.

Practical implications

The outcomes of this paper are significant for large Australian public sector organizations.

Originality/value

This paper provides an integrated workforce management framework for dealing with emergent trends. The findings in this paper are of value to Australian public sector human resource executives.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Bradley Jorgensen

Using the Education Queensland Reform Agenda to illustrate examples and approaches to education reform, this article discusses education reform for at‐risk youth. It argues that…

Abstract

Using the Education Queensland Reform Agenda to illustrate examples and approaches to education reform, this article discusses education reform for at‐risk youth. It argues that the characteristics of modernity, the rise of Mode 2 Society, and the power asymmetries associated with the emergence of the politico‐economic will contain the reform ambitions of the Education Queensland and other education reform agendas. It is proposed that the State adopt a transgressive and complimentary set of reform strategies including the adoption of distributed governance, making available meaningful school performance data, encouraging experimentation and facilitating broad stakeholder, community and neighbourhood engagement in school planning and operations. The article argues that measures such as these will assist to mobilize trust, minimise social fragmentation, generate and regenerate community resources, build cohesion, foster the socio‐cultural‐self‐identities of ‘at‐risk’ youth and will assist youth to achieve full participation in a robust and vibrant democracy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Bradley Jorgensen

On 16 July 2003 the Australian Government’s Treasurer, the Honourable Peter Costello, addressed the Sydney Institute on his vision for a tolerant Australian society. Drawing from…

370

Abstract

On 16 July 2003 the Australian Government’s Treasurer, the Honourable Peter Costello, addressed the Sydney Institute on his vision for a tolerant Australian society. Drawing from Putnam’s research Costello argued that tolerance will flow from an active voluntary sector. However, Costello’s proposed model for a “tolerant” society fails to acknowledge that all behaviour is strategic and that voluntary association based on disinterested action is not possible. Ultimately, Treasurer Costello’s notion of tolerant society fuelled by an active voluntary sector may not lead to his desired end. Indeed, the promotion of voluntary association may contribute to the ongoing exclusion of citizens with low social capital. Amid the dynamism of the modern era some citizens such as ageing workers, slow or ineffective learners and women may be especially at risk. Accordingly, rather than advocating a policy approach that seeks to build inclusiveness through an active voluntary sector this paper recommends a policy approach that explores ways in which to strengthen learning and the wider involvement of individuals through both formal and informal means.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Bradley Jorgensen and Philip Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to assess risks and prospects for older workers and to provide a number of recommendations designed to marshal the interests of employees, business

2610

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess risks and prospects for older workers and to provide a number of recommendations designed to marshal the interests of employees, business and government.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the terrain of competing interests and dynamic complexities of workforce ageing, by elaborating on the topic of economic globalisation, the policy approaches adopted by government, the actions taken by industry and the working and life preferences of older workers.

Findings

In the absence of a deep understanding of the current relationship between demographic ageing, the labour market and economic globalisation, the policy aspirations of government face the prospect of limited success. The currently popular premise, that ageing populations go hand‐in‐hand with ageing workforces, appears to be contradicted by much of the available evidence, which points to rather more complex scenarios, in which outcomes are uncertain, but clearly where late career workers may not necessarily fare well.

Originality/value

The paper brings analysis to the area of ageing populations and the labour market in the context of globalization – a complex and important topic that is usually dealt with far too simply.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Bradley Jorgensen

This paper aims to investigate a workforce policy response to the ageing workforce, emerging social and demographic trends, ongoing and rapid change, the growth in complexity and

5576

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate a workforce policy response to the ageing workforce, emerging social and demographic trends, ongoing and rapid change, the growth in complexity and the changing nature of work.

Design/methodology/approach

The main method for constructing this paper is analysis of selected texts rather than the more conventional empirical studies. The approach is that of scenario construction, guided by the criteria established by Nowotny et al. Evidence is gathered of emergent trends that affect management practices and structures now and in the foreseeable future. These trends are identified and woven into a commentary that links them in a focus on the priorities for Australian organizations.

Findings

The findings from this research suggest that “command‐based” management structures of the bureaucracy, given emergent trends, present as an impediment to organizational success. Rather, a workforce policy reform agenda for both understanding and managing noted historical conditions in a coherent way is proposed.

Practical implications

The conclusions of this paper are significant for large organizations faced with the dynamism of the modern era and the difficulties associated with emerging demographic and social trends. They suggest a workforce policy reform agenda for both understanding and managing these historical conditions in a coherent way.

Originality/value

This paper deals with a topic that is exercising policy makers in all the developed economies. It offers practical advice to assist the development of workforce policy to better manage emergent trends.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2024

Sarah C. Urbanc and Lucinda Dollman

What does special education mean for general education teachers of students with disabilities? In this chapter, we share our approach to advancing values in the classroom…

Abstract

What does special education mean for general education teachers of students with disabilities? In this chapter, we share our approach to advancing values in the classroom placement of special education students in the general education setting. We will take the reader on a journey through time with “Jessie,” a special education student, as we examine the historical exclusion of students with disabilities to their inclusion in general education schools, environments and finally, general education classrooms. In doing so, we will examine the evolution of the general education teacher's role and how the historical perspective impacts current practices. Then, we will elucidate the benefits of inclusion, not only for the special education student but for the nondisabled peers as well. We will recommend values that should be maintained and practices that should be examined. This chapter will conclude with a connection between the values and recommendations of best practices for inclusive instruction.

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

Geoffrey M. Hodgson

The first American university to have a graduate programme was Johns Hopkins, founded in 1876. Between 1880 and 1914 a number of new universities such as Stanford and Chicago were…

Abstract

The first American university to have a graduate programme was Johns Hopkins, founded in 1876. Between 1880 and 1914 a number of new universities such as Stanford and Chicago were established, and older institutions such as Yale and Harvard were modernised. The University of Chicago was founded in 1892, with the help of a large founding endowment from the oil tycoon, John D. Rockefeller.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-089-0

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Nancy Molfenter and Cheryl Hanley-Maxwell

This chapter provides a framework for ethical decision making related to inclusive educational opportunities for secondary students with intellectual and developmental…

Abstract

This chapter provides a framework for ethical decision making related to inclusive educational opportunities for secondary students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) based on policies and practices in the United States. Relevant research findings are utilized to explore ethical principles involved in educational decision making for secondary students with I/DD, with discussions on how these are intertwined with U.S. policy. I/DD and inclusion, as described in the research literature and U.S. policy, are defined and the current status of inclusive practices are described. Next, an exploration of the rationale, as supported by empirical evidence, for educating students at the secondary level with I/DD, primarily with their peers who do not have identified disabilities, is shared along with the counter-narrative. Connections of inclusion to post-school outcomes and the lived educational experiences of students with and without disabilities and educators are considered, including ethical dilemmas and conflicts. Finally, factors influencing the application of inclusionary practices are provided.

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

Keywords

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