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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Tanja Salamon, Borut Milfelner and Jernej Belak

Poor payment discipline has been a constant problem faced by European companies and has only deteriorated with the current global economic crisis. Even though new…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor payment discipline has been a constant problem faced by European companies and has only deteriorated with the current global economic crisis. Even though new legislation has been adopted several times on the European level, the situation has not changed in favor of improved payment discipline. This research aims to determine the correlation between ethical culture of the company and how it influences its payments.

Design/methodology/approach

The factor structure of Kaptein’s (2008) instrument for measuring ethical culture was analyzed using principal component analysis with varimax rotation. This factor analysis yielded six factors with eigenvalues over 1.00. The reliabilities of the single constructs were as follows: clarity (α = 0.891), feasibility (α = 0.918), discussability (α = 0.955), supportability (α = 0.956), sanctionability (α = 0.879) and transparency (α = 0.801). These six factors explained 78 per cent of the total variance. All six factors were named according to Kaptein’s (2008) proposal, whose factor analysis yielded, in addition to the six factors, the following two factors: “Congruence of supervisors” and “Congruence of management”. Both factors represent the ethical culture dimension that Kaptein (1998) called “Congruence”, which refers to the extent to which superiors’ and managers’ acts are in line with their ethics on the declarative level.

Findings

The results showed that two dimensions of ethical culture, sanctionability and feasibility, improve payment discipline.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study provide an important link between ethical culture and late payments. However, the research has some limitations. The first limitation is the response rate of only 9.1 per cent. The next limitation is geographical location; the results in other European countries could be different. The third limitation of the research arises from the data collection, because ethical culture was evaluated by one person from each enterprise, and the average payment delay was also calculated based only on a sample of invoices. Future research should therefore attempt to confirm the correlation between ethical culture and payment discipline in other European countries. It would be interesting to compare finds among different European countries, to determine whether there are major differences among companies in the field of payment discipline.

Originality/value

Good payment discipline can be defined as settling obligations to the customer on time. Late payments have been one of the biggest problems in many European economies. Trade credit becomes even more important during economic crises (Guariglia and Mateut, 2006), when investments are in decline, trading volume is reduced, bank credit is harder to obtain and interest rates are increased (Vojinović et al., 2013; Lin and Martin, 2010). Because customers do not fulfill their obligations on time, even enterprises with healthy sales growth encounter cash flow problems (Tsai, 2011). This paper’s empirical research has been implemented in Slovenia because it has some of the worst payment disciplines among European countries. Such research is unique in Slovenia as well as wider.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Borut Milfelner, Tanja Vidergar Kikel, Damijan Mumel and Aleksandra Pisnik

The purpose of this paper is to measure attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services among women and to determine the potential segments of women according to their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services among women and to determine the potential segments of women according to their attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services and discover the main differences among them.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was implemented on a sample of 258 women in Slovenia. A quota sample was chosen for this research following the age characteristics of the Slovenian female population. The data collection method used was personal interviews. Convergent validity for the attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services was assessed with exploratory factor analysis. The segmentation analysis procedure was implemented in two phases. First, hierarchical clustering with Ward’s method was deployed, and in the second step K-means cluster analysis was used.

Findings

The results show that four clusters were clearly distinctive according to three dimensions, namely, intrapersonal, social and consider component. In further analysis, four segments of women were analysed regarding the fear of ageing, the importance of appearance, body image and self-esteem. Results show that all four segments are unique and distinguish one from another.

Practical implications

Through segmentation analysis, authors of this study indicate two segments (target groups) that are possibly interesting for providers of cosmetic services. Marketing communication activities should mainly be focussed on the woman’s appearance.

Originality/value

Based on a theoretical hypothesis and use a quantitative method, the aim of this paper is to provide a deeper analysis and understanding of attitudes and views of different woman profile regarding cosmetic surgeries. It presents a more structured view on differences that exist among segments of female consumers while also adding new insights into the factors that influence attitudes towards cosmetic procedures.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sasa Zupan and Borut Milfelner

The purpose of this paper is to explore small hotels guests' perception of social responsibility (SR), to relate their SR perceptions with their motivation for choosing…

2420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore small hotels guests' perception of social responsibility (SR), to relate their SR perceptions with their motivation for choosing small hotels instead of large ones, and to check whether motivation is further related to guests' satisfaction. System thinking is used for better attainment of SR through linking the environmental and social dimension of hotel guests' SR perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts with a theoretical background for the conceptual model. The empirical quantitative research was conducted in 2013. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire. The hypotheses were analysed with structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings show that guests of small hotels perceive SR predominantly through its environmental and socio-local perspective. The guests with stronger perception of SR are more motivated to choose small hotels for their vacations, and at the same time, demonstrate a higher level of satisfaction with their choice.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to guests of small hotels only and to two dimensions of SR: environmental and socio-local.

Originality/value

Results of the study should encourage the small hotel operators to implement system thinking when reviewing their existing SR actions and adding some new ones. Relevant SR actions in small hotels, based on managers' system thinking, should become an important part of strategic, managerial and operational decisions.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Sonja Sibila Lebe and Borut Milfelner

To work out an innovative organisation model for tourism destinations in rural areas.

4948

Abstract

Purpose

To work out an innovative organisation model for tourism destinations in rural areas.

Design/methodology/approach

By outlining the problematic of tourism development in rural areas and implementing the concept of network management and the systems theory, we developed an innovative approach to destination management for non‐urban areas.

Findings

Network management means a new lesson for destination management. Our model has been conceived to systematically deal with different subsystems and both systemic and non‐systemic entities in a rural destination.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is limited to destination management in rural areas only. Although several methods suit different types of destinations, some seem to be less adequate for rural areas. The model was intended to search an optimal organisational model only.

Originality/value

The model introduces an original approach to the destination management and allows its application in a wide range of real situations. It can help achieving a better organisation and thus an improved competitiveness of a rural destination.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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