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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Patricia L. Baratta and Jeffrey R. Spence

The multidimensional structure of boredom poses unique measurement challenges related to scale length and statistical modeling. We systematically address these concerns in…

Abstract

The multidimensional structure of boredom poses unique measurement challenges related to scale length and statistical modeling. We systematically address these concerns in two studies. In Study 1, we use item response theory to shorten the 29-item Multidimensional State Boredom Scale (MSBS) (Fahlman et al., 2013). In Study 2, we use structural equation modeling to compare two theoretically consistent multidimensional structures of boredom (superordinate and multivariate) with the most commonly used, yet theoretically inconsistent, structure in boredom research (unidimensional parallel model). Our findings provide support for modeling boredom as multidimensional and demonstrate the impact of model selection on effect sizes and significance.

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Nader Azizi, Ming Liang and Saeed Zolfaghari

Boredom is believed to be the common cause of workers' absenteeism, accidents, job dissatisfaction, and performance variations in manufacturing environments with…

Abstract

Purpose

Boredom is believed to be the common cause of workers' absenteeism, accidents, job dissatisfaction, and performance variations in manufacturing environments with repetitive jobs. Effectively measuring and possibly predicting job boredom is the key to the design and implementation of appropriate strategies to deal with such undesirable emotional state. The purpose of this paper is to present new methodologies to measure and predict human boredom at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Two series of mathematical formulations, linear and nonlinear, to describe the variation of human boredom at work are first presented. Given the complexity of human emotions, the authors also present a probabilistic framework based on state‐of‐the‐art Bayesian networks to model employees' boredom at work.

Findings

The proposed methods centre on the prediction and measurement of human boredom at work. They enable managers to take proactive actions to deal with human boredom at work. Examples of such actions are task rotation and job redesign.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed methods are verified using a number of cases describing a set of phenomena that may occur in the real world. However, further research is required to demonstrate the validity of the models using real world data.

Originality/value

According to accessible literature, human boredom is being measured by self reporting scales thus far. This study describes and demonstrates analytical approaches to model human boredom at work.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

John W. Whiteoak

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dimensions of boredom-coping in the workplace and develop a linear equation capable of predicting a single individual's boredom

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1232

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dimensions of boredom-coping in the workplace and develop a linear equation capable of predicting a single individual's boredom-coping capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a mixed-methods approach and triangulates the identification of themes through, consultation with five industry experts, 23 individual interviews and 169 survey respondents.

Findings

A linear composite that explains 41.4 percent of the variance in boredom-coping (r=0.66, p<0.001) was developed. The model was derived from four constructs identified from primary qualitative data. These were, personality traits (i.e. conscientiousness, openness, work ethic, and extraversion), attitude to challenge, trainable abilities (i.e. practical intelligence, foresight ability, and situational awareness), and group potency.

Research limitations/implications

These findings provide research implications for the study of boredom-coping at work. Common-method artifacts are a potential limitation of the conclusions drawn. However, the mixed-methods approach, independent samples at each stage, and multiple data collection sites and times, supports the integrity of the findings discussed.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this research includes providing strategies for human resource decisions associated with recruitment, selection, and front-line training interventions. The model indicates training may be targeted at different areas of the equation with markedly different impact and return depending on the timed nature of interventions.

Originality/value

The findings support the development of approaches that may help to create a more engaged, productive, and well-adjusted workforce. The translation of the findings to the “bottom-line” is also significant.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Iryna Pentina, Mohammadali Zolfagharian and Aurélia Michaud-Trevinal

The objectives of the paper were to develop a theoretical framework of the online shopping experiences (OSE) concept, identify its constituent dimensions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of the paper were to develop a theoretical framework of the online shopping experiences (OSE) concept, identify its constituent dimensions and subdimensions, and propose and test a comprehensive measurement scale that would incorporate and reconcile existing fragmented approaches to the phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilized a mixed-method approach to conceptualize a complex phenomenon of online shopping experiences (OSE). Study 1 employed the grounded theory approach to understand the phenomenon, propose its comprehensive definition and a conceptual model. Study 2 developed and tested a comprehensive OSE measurement scale.

Findings

The study conceptualized OSE as a second-order construct with four mutually-connected constituent dimensions of OSE: practices, context, values and emotions, and their respective 21 subdimensions. It developed and validated a comprehensive scale that is superior to earlier proposed fragmented measures of OSE.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed theoretical framework can serve as a foundation for the OSE research stream and consolidate existing findings by providing a conceptual umbrella for different OSE aspects addressed in earlier research. The OSE measurement scale can be used to assess the impact of each OSE component on satisfaction and loyalty in different shopping situations.

Practical implications

The findings can assist retailers in evaluating usefulness of various tools in eliciting certain experiential effects, devising specific approaches to consumers at different touch points along their dynamic OSEs and developing engagement tactics for various shopping environments.

Originality/value

The study combined qualitative and quantitative approaches to offer a most comprehensive and unifying conceptualization and measurement instrument of OSEs.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Debra L Nelson and Bret L Simmons

This chapter proposes a more holistic approach to understanding work stress by incorporating eustress, the positive response to stressors. We begin by casting the study of…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a more holistic approach to understanding work stress by incorporating eustress, the positive response to stressors. We begin by casting the study of eustress as part of a contemporary movement in both psychology and organizational behavior that accentuates the positive aspects of human adaptation and functioning. We discuss the development of the concept of eustress, and provide extensive evidence, both psychological and physiological, for the purpose of developing an explicit construct definition. An exploratory study of hospital nurses is presented as an initial test of our holistic model of stress. We conclude by asserting that there must exist a complement to coping with distress such that rather than preventing or resolving the negative side of stress, individuals savor the positive side of stress.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Antónia Correia, Adriano Pimpão and Geoffrey Crouch

Risk is a major concern among tourists and the objective of this chapter is to investigate how different factors contribute to the overall perceived risk and how novelty…

Abstract

Risk is a major concern among tourists and the objective of this chapter is to investigate how different factors contribute to the overall perceived risk and how novelty motivations moderate this risk. The sample population of the study consists of 4,057 international tourists on low-cost travel visiting the Algarve, Portugal in 2005 and 2006. The research findings show that the sensibility towards the occurrence of any type of risk vary with the tourist's age, familiarity with the destination, and travel experience as well as their propensity to seek novelty. Furthermore, it finds that younger tourists are more apt to be novelty seekers and, simultaneously, less sensitive to risk, than older tourists are. Familiarity with the destination derives from previous visits, diminishes the sensibility to the risk, and increases the degree of novelty-seeking. This chapter discusses specific managerial and theoretical implications.

Details

Advances in Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-522-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Manuel J. Sánchez‐Franco and José L. Roldán

To analyse the web acceptance and usage between goal‐directed users and experiential users, incorporating intrinsic motives to improve the particular and explanatory TAM…

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4482

Abstract

Purpose

To analyse the web acceptance and usage between goal‐directed users and experiential users, incorporating intrinsic motives to improve the particular and explanatory TAM (technology acceptance model) value – traditionally related to extrinsic motives.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was used to gather data to test the relationships shown in the research model. Data were collected from a sample of online questionnaires filled out by subscribers located in three discussion‐mailing lists – administered by RedIris – about different topics (e.g. experimental sciences, social sciences and humanities). A structural equation modeling (SEM), specifically partial least squares (PLS), is proposed to assess the relationships between the constructs together with the predictive power of the research model.

Findings

The empirical development suggests that there is scope for further extension of TAM to adapt to the web‐based usage and its profitable consequences. The article may help to further the empirical research and to clarify and examine a web acceptance and usage model. In general, experiential and goal‐directed behaviours moderate the key relationships in the model. Experiential and goal‐directed users do not weigh extrinsic and intrinsic motives in the same way when on the web. Goal‐directed users are more driven by instrumental factors and focused on their decision‐making process while experiential users are more motivated by process..

Research limitations/implications

First, constructs of enjoyment and concentration are used to define flow. However, because of the flow definition's conceptual‐vagueness, operationalising the flow construct has been questioned in the previous empirical works. Second, the cross‐sectional study is also an important limitation. Since the users' perception and intention can change over time, it is important to measure these quantities at several points of time. Third, the sample sizes are relatively small. Fourth, the model needs to be tested with more objective measures to compare possible divergences. Finally, the model clearly does not include all the relevant variables.

Practical implications

The results could be used to explain and to improve the experiential and goal‐directed users' experience of being and to return to the web.

Originality/value

The value of this study is to reveal the moderating influences of browsing‐modes on relationship between flow and TAM‐beliefs on the web, and, also, how the flow impacts the attitude and intention to use web between experiential and goal‐directed users.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Shian-Yang Tzeng and Jerry Yuwen Shiu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate post-purchase regret and its relationships with complaint and risk aversion in a four-dimensional framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate post-purchase regret and its relationships with complaint and risk aversion in a four-dimensional framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 548 effective samples, this study employed structural equation modeling to test proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Based on levels of perceived self-responsibility, post-purchase regret due to forgone alternatives, under consideration and over consideration was positively associated with customer complaining, whereas post-purchase regret due to significance change exhibited no such correlation. Moreover, a higher level of risk aversion increased the effect of utilitarian motivation on post-purchase regret due to over consideration but decreased this effect on post-purchase regret due to under consideration.

Research limitations/implications

First, regret can positively influence consumer complaints. Next, consumers are unlikely to complain to third parties unless they experience strong action regret. Finally, risk aversion can alleviate or reinforce the effect of utilitarian motivation on regret. Future research could examine the customer group who feel less or no regret of their purchases to contribute to regret theory.

Practical implications

To reduce regret among such consumers, marketers are advised to apply precision marketing techniques to reach their target consumers. Second, to forestall customer regret due to forgone alternatives, sellers should proactively provide target buyers with information regarding their products and those of competing brands. Third, another method of minimizing regret is to ensure that consumers’ risk-aversion activities are effective.

Originality/value

This study empirically demonstrated a multidimensional scale of regret to illuminate the multicausal role of regret in relation to consumers’ complaining and risk-aversion behaviors.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Stephanie Hui-Wen Chuah, Philipp A. Rauschnabel, Malliga Marimuthu, Ramayah Thurasamy and Bang Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to go beyond satisfaction as an indicator of customer loyalty and propose a holistic model of service switching in a mobile internet setting…

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3093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to go beyond satisfaction as an indicator of customer loyalty and propose a holistic model of service switching in a mobile internet setting. The model, which reflects both barriers and inducements of switching, is developed based on the “mooring” and “pull” concepts in the migration literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on Generation Y mobile internet subscribers, the study analyzed a total of 417 usable questionnaire responses. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to test the research model.

Findings

The results show that first, satisfaction and switching barriers (i.e. a focal firm’s marketing innovation initiatives, switching costs, inertia, and local network effects) are positively related to customer loyalty; second, switching barriers have a stronger influence on customer loyalty compared with satisfaction; third, switching inducements (i.e. competitors’ marketing innovation initiatives, alternative attractiveness, variety-seeking tendencies, and consumers’ susceptibility to social reference group influence) is negatively related to customer loyalty and the relationship is weaker when perceived switching barriers are high.

Originality/value

This study empirically validates multidimensional scales of switching barriers and inducements from a more nuanced perspective, and specifies them as reflective-formative type II models. This study is among the first to use opposing dimensions to measure switching barriers and its counterpart. Hence, it illustrates how the two contrasting mechanisms can coexist in the minds of mobile internet subscribers.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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