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Article

E.E. Lawrence

Diverse books is a fundamentally political concept that performs particular normative work in discursive space. Part I of this project demonstrated that this was the case…

Abstract

Purpose

Diverse books is a fundamentally political concept that performs particular normative work in discursive space. Part I of this project demonstrated that this was the case, further claiming that descriptive conceptual analysis was therefore methodologically inadequate to the task of defining the term. The purpose of this paper – Part II of II – is to advance a universal account of diverse books using an alternative form of conceptual analysis designed to suit the needs and commitments of LIS scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes and deploys a new method called informational pragmatic analysis, through which one develops accounts of political concepts in terms of their legitimate aims and benefits vis-à-vis informational justice.

Findings

Diverse books are those systematically devalorized literary works we must make an ameliorative effort to promote in order to advance informational justice for oppressed persons in particular. These works exist on a contextually specific spectrum of moral urgency. A critical task for the diverse books movement is therefore to determine through democratic deliberation which (types of) books are most urgently in need of promotion under varying sociopolitical conditions.

Originality/value

In addition to proposing a new analytical methodology for LIS, the paper articulates and defends a pragmatic account of diverse books that resists regressive misappropriation. This further lays the groundwork for future critical interrogations of the activities of various agents and agencies of print, both within and beyond the library.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Seth Ketron and Kelly Naletelich

Although the functional benefits of e-books have been discussed in the emerging literature on the e-reader platform, the hedonic/emotional aspects of e-book usage have not…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the functional benefits of e-books have been discussed in the emerging literature on the e-reader platform, the hedonic/emotional aspects of e-book usage have not been explored. This study aims to explore the impact that e-readers have on consumers’ connections with books. Relying on self-concept theory and possessions as the extended self, the authors address the following two questions: What are the hedonic differences between e-books and printed books, and, if the functional benefits of e-books are so compelling, then why do some people still use printed books?

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers pursue a qualitative design through the use of semi-structured interviews, with a combination of base questions and follow-up questions tailored to the individual respondent.

Findings

The results reveal six primary themes: convenience, change, community, collection, connection and children. Within each, functional benefits are identified, confirming prior literature on these benefits, and hedonic/emotional themes emerge, revealing that e-readers are capable of changing consumers’ connections with books. Namely, while e-books offer functional benefits over printed books, consumers feel less connected to books read using an e-reader platform and prefer to purchase the printed versions of books that hold special meanings for them. These findings align with self-concept theory and indicate that printed books are an extension of the self, one that cannot be completely replaced by e-books.

Originality/value

This research adds to the emerging literature on e-books by demonstrating that e-readers have emotional implications for consumers as components of the self-concept/extended self. Prior literature has focused solely on the functional benefits associated with e-books but has not directly addressed the role of books in the self-concept.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article

E. E. Lawrence

The term diverse books is increasingly popular yet persistently nebulous. The purpose of this paper – Part I of II – is to illuminate both that the concept is in need of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The term diverse books is increasingly popular yet persistently nebulous. The purpose of this paper – Part I of II – is to illuminate both that the concept is in need of a unified account and that conceptual analysis, though at first seemingly quite promising, fails as a method for identifying one.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes traditional (or intuitive) conceptual analysis to specify the respective clusters of necessary and sufficient conditions that constitute four broad candidate accounts of diverse books.

Findings

Though diverse books is a concept in need of a definition, conceptual analysis is not an appropriate method for adjudicating between the definitions we have on offer. This is because the concept is fundamentally political, serving as a resource for re-shaping collective social arrangements and ways of life. The conceptual problem outlined here requires for its resolution a method that will move us from a descriptive project to an explicitly normative one, wherein we consider what we properly work to achieve with and through the concept in question.

Originality/value

This paper initiates a systematic analytical project aimed at defining diverse books. In illustrating a moment of methodological failure, it paves the way for a critical alternative – namely, Part II's proposal of an analytical intervention in which political concepts are defined partially in terms of their benefits vis-á-vis informational justice.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Miguel A. Martínez‐Prieto, Pablo de la Fuente, Jesús M. Vegas, Joaquín Adiego and Carlos E. Cuesta

This paper aims to present the concept of electronic work, such as an e‐book integrator of concerns (logical structure, appearance and functionality), for representing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the concept of electronic work, such as an e‐book integrator of concerns (logical structure, appearance and functionality), for representing literary texts available in electronic heterogeneous environments.

Design/methodology/approach

From the generic description of an e‐book and the descriptive requirements of the BiDiLiC project, the concept of electronic work is presented. These requirements involve a descriptive markup policy (based on TEI‐Lite) which defines the text's logical structure and is used for integrating the other concerns associated with the text: functionality and appearance. Finally, the article presents an example showing the integration of the previous concepts to achieve a functional implementation of the electronic work.

Findings

The electronic work covers the requirements of classic literary texts, while still allowing other types of texts to be represented easily. For this purpose, a robust logical structure based on TEI is defined, which offers an interchange norm for information stored in an electronic form. This representation, developed in XML, allows the logical structure of the text to be described generically, facilitating the integration (around it) of the service's functionality, as well as adapting its appearance for use in heterogeneous environments, such as the internet.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a new approach for interacting with electronic content. This approach is presented from conceptual basis to functional representation by way of theoretical reasoning and innovative technology.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Monica Landoni and Forbes Gibb

This paper starts from the observation that the appearance of information contributes to its overall value and that, because there are many ways to represent information…

Abstract

This paper starts from the observation that the appearance of information contributes to its overall value and that, because there are many ways to represent information, it is very important to find the model which is going to be the most effective and conveys the greatest value of the original information. Appearance has always played a key role in the learning process, as it facilitates the discovery of new concepts by allowing visual association with those which are already familiar. This is why metaphors are so important in learning in general, and have therefore proved to be a valuable tool for designing alternative paradigms when adapting traditional tasks to novel environments. This paper will briefly discuss the link between paper books and their electronic counterparts. It will then focus on the role of metaphors in producing electronic books and introduce and discuss the importance of the visual rhetoric concept in driving the design process. Finally it will also present the main results of the visual book experiment and how these results can be interpreted in the context of the visual rhetoric approach.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Book part

Sarah Jo Sandefur, Amye R. Warren and Anne Gamble

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and…

Abstract

Project REEL (Resources for Early Educator Learning) was a quasi-experimental, delayed-treatment professional development (PD) design to provide training, coaching, and materials to 220 early childhood educators (ECEs) in 85 diverse, high-needs settings (family, group, and center-based) across Tennessee. Its two primary goals were to (1) increase the frequency of research-based classroom learning experiences that promote language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional development among diverse early learners through training and coaching to ECEs and (2) improve the language/literacy, numeracy, and social/emotional readiness of children in low-income areas through research-based training of ECEs and parents. Even with differences in ECEs’ educational backgrounds and diverse settings, teachers in both treatment groups improved and maintained their knowledge and skills in response to the intervention. Preschool children in two cohorts showed significant improvements in most language and literacy measures over the course of an academic year, and improvements were often beyond that due to maturation (using age-controlled measures). Given the amount of improvement seen across a wide array of measures, there is substantial convergent evidence that the Project REEL PD approach was successful in promoting long-lasting improvements in the practices of ECEs in diverse settings and from diverse backgrounds. This chapter follows the development, implementation, and results of two literacy-related modules (“Print Awareness” and “Book Strategies”) for directors and teachers of three- and four-year-olds. These modules are representative of our training design, with its intensive focus on coaching in the diverse settings, and will provide the most beneficial model for other ECE professional developers to follow.

Details

The Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grant: Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-280-8

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Article

Katie Blake

The Smart Book involves the direct application of computer technology to the book marketplace. It employs speacial‐purpose equipment to simplify the user's access to…

Abstract

The Smart Book involves the direct application of computer technology to the book marketplace. It employs speacial‐purpose equipment to simplify the user's access to information that would normally be found in a printed book. The concept invovles two distinct components: a reader unit and a book pack. The reader unit is a device that contains computer equipment, a custom liquid crystal display screen, and six user control buttons. All facilities for reading, searching, indexing, and so on can be performed using those six controls. The Smart Book Text Pack, or The Book, is currently a one‐megabyte ROM pack using conventional micro‐computer read‐only memory chips. This on‐megabyte pack contains the text of a book and its appropriate program functions. The text is held on the ROM pack in a proprietary compressed format.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

D.G. Gouws and H.M. van der Poll

We know more about the past than about the future. Accounting information and knowledge of the past come from the fact that the methods we use to arrive at beliefs about…

Abstract

We know more about the past than about the future. Accounting information and knowledge of the past come from the fact that the methods we use to arrive at beliefs about the past are generally more reliable than those generating predictions of the future. Because future uncertainty is linked to the arrow of time, its increase coincides with the flow of time from the past and present to the future. To facilitate and decrease uncertainty, accountants produce an ever‐increasing amount of future‐oriented information through the use of inter alia book entries. The integrity issues of this method of information creation are investigated in this article. It is found that the integrity of information may be affected when book entries are used.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

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Abstract

Details

Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Book part

Christine Bruce, Kate Davis, Hilary Hughes, Helen Partridge and Ian Stoodley

The purpose of this book is to open a conversation on the idea of information experience, which we understand to be a complex, multidimensional engagement with…

Abstract

The purpose of this book is to open a conversation on the idea of information experience, which we understand to be a complex, multidimensional engagement with information. In developing the book we invited colleagues to propose a chapter on any aspect of information experience, for example conceptual, methodological or empirical. We invited them to express their interpretation of information experience, to contribute to the development of this concept. The book has thus become a vehicle for interested researchers and practitioners to explore their thinking around information experience, including relationships between information experience, learning experience, user experience and similar constructs. It represents a collective awareness of information experience in contemporary research and practice. Through this sharing of multiple perspectives, our insights into possible ways of interpreting information experience, and its relationship to other concepts in information research and practice, is enhanced. In this chapter, we introduce the idea of information experience. We also outline the book and its chapters, and bring together some emerging alternative views and approaches to this important idea.

Details

Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

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