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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Boo Ho Voon, Nagarajah Lee and Duncan Murray

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the proposed measure of sports service quality (SSQ) and examine the relationships between emotional experience (EE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the proposed measure of sports service quality (SSQ) and examine the relationships between emotional experience (EE) and user satisfaction (US) for sports competitions/training venues (i.e. for the sport of badminton).

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group discussions and related literature review were used to generate items for the SSQ. Structured questionnaires captured the perceptions of 240 users of sports venues in Malaysia. The relationships between SSQ, EE and US were assessed via structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Results show that the SSQ has five dimensions (peripheral, reliability, responsiveness, core and value). Core, peripheral and value have positive effects on users’ EE whereas peripheral, reliability, responsiveness and core have positive effects on US. The SEM analysis suggests that EE mediates the relationship between SSQ and US.

Research limitations/implications

The SSQ scale is developed using data from the badminton sport industry and is yet to be validated in other types of sports venues. In addition, measures of customer loyalty also need to be considered.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that provision of quality service directly influences satisfaction with sports venues and enhances the EE of customers. Sports venue managers should monitor the service management, particularly in terms of the physical environment and personnel.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a specific measure of service quality tailored for use in sports venues. It also provides further support for the mediating role EE plays in the service quality-satisfaction relationship.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Boo Ho Voon, Firdaus Abdullah, Nagarajah Lee and Karen Kueh

This empirical survey research aims to identify the dimensions of service excellence culture for hospitals. Ultimately, a measurement tool was developed for hospital…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical survey research aims to identify the dimensions of service excellence culture for hospitals. Ultimately, a measurement tool was developed for hospital service excellence (i.e. HospiSE scale).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey research involved qualitative and quantitative approaches in the scale development process. The structured questionnaire was carefully designed after literature review and focus groups discussions. The respondents were employees from the public and private hospitals in Malaysia. A total of 1,558 usable questionnaires were used for the quantitative analysis. The HospiSE scale was empirically tested for reliability and validity through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses.

Findings

This measurement-oriented research had identified three dimensions of service excellence culture for hospitals, namely: employee orientation, patient orientation and competitor orientation. The multi-dimensional measure consists of 21 items.

Research limitations/implications

Longitudinal research is required to provide evidence of the causal effects of HospiSE on employee satisfaction and loyalty. The HospiSE scale also requires further verification and refinement.

Practical implications

The parsimonious scale can serve as a strategic and practical measure to evaluate and manage service excellence culture at hospitals. Reliable and valid information can be obtained for fast and cost-effective diagnosis of the service culture for continuous improvement.

Social implications

The new scale is expected to be an important diagnostic to understand and measure service excellence culture at hospitals. The patients and society at large will benefit from the improved hospital service management.

Originality/value

The multi-item measurement tool is new and it can provide insights into service management, resource allocation and human resource management for excellent hospital service. The measurement development process is contextualized for the hospital services.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Boo Ho Voon

The purpose of this research is to empirically develop a service‐driven market orientation construct and test its relationships with service quality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to empirically develop a service‐driven market orientation construct and test its relationships with service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher employs Critical Incident Technique to generate items for the survey instrument. Then, the quantitative‐based descriptive research uses structured questionnaires to capture the perceptions of 558 university students from Malaysia which are used to understand the nature of the customer‐perceived market orientation and its relationship with service quality.

Findings

The results show that the service‐driven market orientation (SERVMO) that consists of six components (customer orientation, competitor orientation, interfunctional orientation, performance orientation, long‐term orientation, and employee orientation) has a significantly strong and positive relationship with service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The SERVMO scale is developed using data from the higher education sector and is yet to be validated in other industries.

Practical implications

The proposed strategic construct and current findings on its relationships with service quality provide practical insights for service managers to monitor their service orientation and enhance service quality.

Originality/value

The newly developed SERVMO scale is originally derived from the customer perception data in the Malaysian higher education sector.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Karen Kueh and Boo Ho Voon

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of individual‐level cultural dimensions on Generation Y consumers' expectations of service quality.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of individual‐level cultural dimensions on Generation Y consumers' expectations of service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Service quality and individual‐level cultural values were measured using existing scales from the literature. Factor analysis was conducted to verify the factor structures of both constructs while structural equation modeling was employed to examine the measures for cultural values and service quality dimensions.

Findings

Four out of the five hypotheses are supported and the last one is partially confirmed in terms of directional support. Service quality expectations are positively related to uncertainty avoidance and long‐term orientation but negatively related to power distance. Masculinity and collectivism did not have a significant relationship. Service quality was found to be a three‐factor construct consisting of tangibles, reliability and responsiveness/empathy/assurance. Cultural values were confirmed to consist of five dimensions according to Hofstede's typology. Generation Y consumers are found to be low in power distance and have high expectations of service quality.

Research limitation/implications

The main limitations are that the study did not distinguish between different types of full‐service restaurants in its analysis and the sample consisted of undergraduate students only.

Practical implications

The findings indicate the importance of measuring individual‐level cultural values which may be used as a segmentation variable to guide service delivery and resource allocation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the scant research on service quality among Generation Y consumers in developing countries. It also assesses the five‐factor structure of the SERVQUAL scale in a new country setting, that is, Malaysia.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Firdaus Abdullah, Mohd Rashidee Alwi, Nagarajah Lee and Voon Boo Ho

This paper attempts to explore different approaches of franchisee satisfaction within an academic setting, develop and validate a new measuring instrument, examine the key…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to explore different approaches of franchisee satisfaction within an academic setting, develop and validate a new measuring instrument, examine the key factors and the intention to remain in the network, and eventually manage the franchise network for long‐term continuity.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey instrument was drawn from a multi‐stage process involving extensive review of literature, focus group interviews, pilot testing and validation by the experts before being administered to a sample population consisting top managers of franchised colleges. The new instrument was empirically tested for unidimensionality, reliability and validity using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest five dimensions of franchisee satisfaction namely social interaction, service support, financing, assurance and competence. Results also indicate that the dimension “competence” which relates to possession of required skills, knowledge and the right attitude to perform franchise services has significantly influenced the overall satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The five dimensions of franchisee satisfaction may be specific to academic setting.

Practical implications

Academic institutions should be able to ascertain the level of services provided, and to determine which dimensions need improvement. Knowing the strengths and weaknesses of these dimensions and their relative influence may result in better allocation of resources so as to provide a better service to the franchised colleges.

Originality/value

Another contribution to the franchising literature by advancing a new 23‐item measuring instrument, specifically tailored for academic franchising. This is a tool that academic institutions could use to improve their performance in the light of increased competition with the development of global academic franchising.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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