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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Folake Olukemi Samuel, Bolanle Aishat Akinwande, Rachel Oluwatoyin Opasola, Lukuman Akande Azeez and Adebayo Busura Abass

The purpose of this study is to compare food consumption and dietary diversity in smallholder cassava value chain households (CVCHs) and non-cassava value chain households…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare food consumption and dietary diversity in smallholder cassava value chain households (CVCHs) and non-cassava value chain households (non-CVCHs).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 572 rural households were selected using multi-stage sampling from Oyo and Kwara states, Southwest Nigeria. Socio-demographic, 24 h dietary recall and food frequency questionnaires were used to collect data. Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS) and the Minimum Dietary Diversity for Women of Reproductive Age (MDD-W) were measured.

Findings

The mean age of respondents was 49.1 ± 17.3 years, 68.3 per cent were female, household sizes ranged from 2-20 with an average of 8 members. Most households consumed monotonous staple-based diets mainly from roots and tubers, cereals and legumes. There was no significant difference in HDDS (6.70 ± 1.37 and 6.77 ± 1.12; p = 0.12) and MDD-W (4.78 ± 1.12 and 4.95 ± 1.16; p = 0.09) for CVCH and non-CVCH respectively. About one-third of all women did not achieve the MDD-W score required for micronutrient adequacy, with the main dietary gap being vitamin A-rich fruits and vegetables.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that there was no influence of households’ involvement in cassava value chain activities on their pattern of food consumption and dietary diversity.

Originality/value

While cassava value chain activities have potential for improved livelihoods among its actors, a nutrition-sensitive approach needs to be incorporated to translate this into their improved food consumption, dietary diversity and nutritional (particularly micronutrient) status.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Sadiat Oyenike Babalola and Bolanle Aishat Akinwande

It is very pertinent to determine the nutritional value of indigenous leafy-vegetables to establish their potentials in ensuring adequate nutrition and food security. One of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is very pertinent to determine the nutritional value of indigenous leafy-vegetables to establish their potentials in ensuring adequate nutrition and food security. One of the ways to promote fresh produce is through nutritional information. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Simultaneous multi-element analysis of eight indigenous (with underutilized) vegetables commonly found in the Southwest Nigeria was done by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Wild-grown vegetables were harvested from the National Horticultural Research Institute orchard, in Southwest Nigeria. The contents of investigated quantity minerals as well as trace and heavy metals were determined.

Findings

In all the vegetables, potassium was discovered as the most abundant quantity mineral present with range of 4.364 mg/g in Vernonia amygdalina to 78.218 mg/g in Senecio biafrae (an underutilized vegetable). This was followed by calcium ranging from 3.351 mg/g (Vernonia amygdalina) to 9.914 mg/g (Solanum macrocarpon). Lead had the least content among the heavy metals with range of value from below the detection limit of the method used to 0.05 μg/g.

Practical implications

The results obtained for the mineral profile provide useful information that could sensitize the people on the need for their consumption. This can be a good opportunity to enhance micronutrient supply of the diet of low-income earners which form majority of the society.

Originality/value

Findings from this study indicate that the indigenous vegetables that are not formally cultivated could be important in improving micronutrient deficiency of low-income earners.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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