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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Professor F.A.M. Galbraith

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 72 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Conrad C. Szymczak and Derek H.T. Walker

This paper helps explain the impact and potential for companies to better leverage knowledge and organisational learning from their portfolio of projects. It offers a…

Abstract

This paper helps explain the impact and potential for companies to better leverage knowledge and organisational learning from their portfolio of projects. It offers a model based on analysis of the development of the Boeing Company and from change management theory of a way to achieve an enterprise project management culture through organisational learning. The paper provides insight into and a rationale for improvement of project management practice for organisations that currently possess the ability to intelligently use knowledge gained from many projects to service their stakeholders. This ability provides the feedstock for organisational reinvention that can be a survival mechanism in reacting to changed circumstances as well as providing a proactive mechanism for developing new markets. In doing so, the paper draws attention to both the requisite enterprise knowledge management infrastructure and the required organisational culture that supports commitment and enthusiasm.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Roy Allen

Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Robert S. D'Intino, Trish Boyles, Christopher P. Neck and John R. Hall

In the early twenty‐first century organization scholars and managers face an economic outlook full of daunting challenges. With investors, workers, and other stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

In the early twenty‐first century organization scholars and managers face an economic outlook full of daunting challenges. With investors, workers, and other stakeholders distressed and hostile toward corporate executives and boards due to recent corporate scandals, the future for many industries and firms appears grim. In what ways can business history help corporate managers and new venture entrepreneurs overcome these leadership challenges? This paper seeks to uncover practices throughout the Boeing Company's management history that offer today's executives and board members numerous examples of industry vision and leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Visionary leadership theory is used to help understand Boeing's actions. A theory of visionary entrepreneurial leadership is proposed based on Boeing's history. Four specific cases of aircraft design and development decisions and actions are presented as examples of executive and board directors' vision and leadership.

Findings

Boeing has served as the aircraft industry's innovator and leader for over nine decades by designing and building path‐breaking airplanes when no other aircraft manufacturer would venture similar risks to their reputation and capital. Furthermore, Boeing executives and board directors have repeatedly made risky decisions that – if the prototype literately crashed and burned – would probably bankrupt the company. Management's vision was always on the next great airplane, never on individual image or personal wealth.

Research limitations/implications

Future research directions are presented suggesting a focus on firm executives and boards of directors' decisions and how these decisions influence industry wide innovation and development.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the leadership attributes of Boeing executives over the last nine decades.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Klaus Brauer

Much of the laboratory capacity maintained by a firm to support the peaks in its development cycles can, between peaks, be made available to other companies. Similarly…

Abstract

Much of the laboratory capacity maintained by a firm to support the peaks in its development cycles can, between peaks, be made available to other companies. Similarly, inventions developed for application in a firm's products often have additional applications in fields unrelated to the firm's business. These available capacities and additional applications are byproducts of the development process.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Nabil Al-Najjar, Ichiro Aoyagi, Guy Goldstein, Ted Korupp, Bin Liu and Suchet Singh

Boeing and Airbus are contemplating entry into very-large-aircraft (VLA) markets. Both firms are convinced the market cannot support two players due to the extremely high…

Abstract

Boeing and Airbus are contemplating entry into very-large-aircraft (VLA) markets. Both firms are convinced the market cannot support two players due to the extremely high R&D costs and the limited (and highly uncertain) state of demand. The key strategic issue is the uncertainty surrounding Boeing's development cost: to what extent would Boeing's experience with the 747 help it reduce the R&D cost of a new VLA prototype? The main point is that Boeing's strategic moves signal its private information, and that this eliminates any first-mover advantage Boeing might have had in this market.

To introduce some of the strategic issues arising in natural monopoly industries in which the winner takes all, and focus on the issues of credible preemption and signaling.

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Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Case study
Publication date: 26 February 2016

Jennifer Brown and Craig Garthwaite

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, Boeing and Airbus, the leading manufacturers of large aircraft, were locked in a battle for market share that drove down prices…

Abstract

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, Boeing and Airbus, the leading manufacturers of large aircraft, were locked in a battle for market share that drove down prices for their new planes. At about the same time, the two industry heavyweights began developing new aircraft families to address the future market needs they each projected.

Aircraft take many years to develop, so by the time the new planes made their inaugural flights, significant changes had occurred in the global environment. First, emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region and elsewhere were growing rapidly, spawning immediate and long-term demand for more aircraft. At the same time, changes to the market for air travel had created opportunities for new products. These opportunities had not gone unnoticed by potential new entrants, which were positioning themselves to compete against the market leaders.

In October 2007, the Airbus superjumbo A380 made its first flight. The A380 carried more passengers than any other plane in history and had been touted as a solution to increased congestion at global mega-hub airports. Four years later the Boeing 787, a smaller long-range aircraft, was launched to service secondary cities in a point-to-point network.

The case provides students with an opportunity to analyze the profit potential of the global aircraft manufacturing industry in 2002 and in 2011. Students can also identify the actions of participants that weakened or intensified the pressure on profits within the industry.

Audio format (.mp3 file) available with purchase of PDF. Contact cases@kellogg.northwestern.edu for access.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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