Search results

1 – 10 of 14
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Bodo Lang, Joya Kemper, Rebecca Dolan and Gavin Northey

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how sharing economy users switch from consumer (e.g. Airbnb guest) to provider (e.g. Airbnb host), and how this helps…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how sharing economy users switch from consumer (e.g. Airbnb guest) to provider (e.g. Airbnb host), and how this helps enrich self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an exploratory study with users who had been consumers (i.e. Airbnb guests) and had switched to being providers (i.e. Airbnb hosts).

Findings

Consumers switch to being providers across four phases: “catalysts”, “enablers”, “drivers” and “glue”. The authors identify various extrinsic and intrinsic motivations unique to the switch and map these against motivators postulated by self-determination theory.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose a four-phase process through which consumers become providers. The present study enriches self-determination theory by showing how users' psychosocial needs are addressed through a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that are unique to the role switch. The authors further show how the importance of the three key psychosocial self-determination needs varies through the switch process, thus providing a more nuanced understanding of users' drive for self-determination.

Practical implications

This study offers several recommendations to help sharing economy platforms improve their processes and communication to encourage a greater number of consumers to switch roles and become providers. These recommendations address two aspects: (1) encouraging consumers to switch roles and become providers (i.e. acquisition) and following this (2) encouraging providers to continue to perform that role (i.e. retention).

Originality/value

Much research has investigated why users become consumers (e.g. Airbnb guests) or providers (e.g. Airbnb hosts) in the sharing economy. However, research to date has not fully embraced the two-sided nature of the sharing economy. Therefore, this is the first paper to explore why and how consumers switch roles and become providers in the sharing economy, and how this helps enrich self-determination theory.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Bodo Lang, Rebecca Dolan, Joya Kemper and Gavin Northey

This paper defines prosumers in light of the COVID-19 crisis and other contexts. It addresses how prosumers helped overcome challenges caused by COVID-19 and is the first…

Downloads
3264

Abstract

Purpose

This paper defines prosumers in light of the COVID-19 crisis and other contexts. It addresses how prosumers helped overcome challenges caused by COVID-19 and is the first paper to develop a taxonomy of prosumers, their differentiating characteristics and the degree to which they are useful in overcoming the challenges of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a literature search of the prosumer literature using the Web of Science and Scopus databases.

Findings

This study solves a definitional dilemma of prosumers and develops six prosumer archetypes displaying the nuances of prosumers. The study shows that the six prosumer archetypes vary in their usefulness in addressing challenges caused by COVID-19. The findings demonstrate the micro (individual), meso (organizational) and macro (societal) benefits offered by prosumers in times of crises.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some clear implications for the prosumer literature, the services literature and the crisis literature by clarifying the role of prosumers in times of crisis.

Practical implications

This paper offers several implications at the micro (individual), meso (organizational), and macro (societal) levels that are offered by prosumers in times of crises. The benefits of prosumers afford individuals, service practitioners and other organizations ways to remain resilient and strong in the face of significant crises such as COVID-19.

Originality/value

This paper makes three specific contributions. First, it contributes to the service literature by highlighting the role and value of prosumers in crises, an area currently under-researched. Secondly, it developed six prosumer archetypes displaying the nuances of prosumers, contributing to the prosumer literature by sharpening the focus of this versatile phenomenon and demonstrating the differential value of each type of prosumer in times of crises. Lastly, the study advances the prosumer literature by resolving the definitional dilemma of prosumers and by providing a broad, yet specific definition of prosumers that captures the different perspectives evident in the prosumer literature.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Robert Davis and Bodo Lang

The aim of this paper is to measure the empirical relationship between self‐congruity and game usage and purchase. This is important because it highlights that games…

Downloads
1428

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to measure the empirical relationship between self‐congruity and game usage and purchase. This is important because it highlights that games affect self concept and the symbolic value that can be obtained from the game. It is aimed to implement this study across four game types.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 493 consumers were surveyed and confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling conducted across four game groups to model this same relationship.

Findings

It was found that self‐congruity was positively related to game usage and purchase.

Practical implications

Game development for consumers online, on wireless devices and on consoles should place greater emphasis on the practical implications of self‐congruity. Games impact self concept through self‐congruity. So, it is important that marketers understand the potential harm and positive impact of games on the consumers' cognition.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to explore and model self‐congruity and game purchase and usage behaviour. This paper is further unique because it provides results across four games groups: all games representing, followed by the alternative models, Sports/Simulation/Driving, Role‐playing Game (RPG)/Massively Multiplayer Online Role‐playing Game (MMORPG)/Strategy, and Action/Adventure/Fighting,

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Bodo Lang

Word‐of‐mouth (WOM) communication, satisfaction and service quality are inextricably linked. However, despite much research, the shape of the satisfaction‐WOM relationship…

Downloads
5034

Abstract

Purpose

Word‐of‐mouth (WOM) communication, satisfaction and service quality are inextricably linked. However, despite much research, the shape of the satisfaction‐WOM relationship is not known. At present, three relationships are supported. This paper aims to develop and test a model of how the satisfaction‐WOM relationship varies depending on the type of service encounter, thus reconciling past conflicting findings.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of service quality indicators are manipulated and a fully factorial 2×3 experiment is conducted to test the hypotheses on 281 respondents.

Findings

All four hypotheses are supported; in certain types of service encounters high levels of satisfaction lead to greater WOM activity than low levels of satisfaction (positivity bias) and this relationship is reversed in a second type of service encounter (negativity bias).

Research limitations/implications

This research shows that relationships between constructs are highly context dependent and can change dramatically. Future research would do well to test the framework developed in this paper with different respondents and different types of encounters.

Practical implications

To best benefit from WOM, practitioners are advised to vary their management of service quality and customer satisfaction, depending on the type of service industry they operate in.

Originality/value

This paper reconciles three conflicting streams of research. This is also the first paper to empirically test a service taxonomy developed by Price et al. and to demonstrate consumers' vastly different reactions to the resulting two extreme types of services.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Mark Colgate and Bodo Lang

Much research looks at why customers switch service organizations but there has been less focus on why customers do not switch service organizations, even though they have…

Downloads
7178

Abstract

Much research looks at why customers switch service organizations but there has been less focus on why customers do not switch service organizations, even though they have seriously considered doing so. In light of this, we present an analysis of the literature and develop a list of potential switching barriers. These switching barriers are then empirically tested within two financial services industries. Results from over 400 consumers enable us to ascertain not only the importance of each switching barrier but also to develop a more parsimonious understanding of these barriers, through factor analysis. The results reveal similar patterns in the two industries in respect to switching barriers. The first of the four factors contains reasons related to apathy, the second factor contains negative reasons for customers staying with their current service provider, the third factor relates to relationship variables and the final factor relates to service recovery. Results clearly indicate that the first two factors are far more important than the latter two in terms of why customers stay even when they seriously considered leaving.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Robert Davis, Bodo Lang and Neil Gautam

It is assumed that consumers consume games to experience hedonic and utilitarian value. However, there is no conceptual model or empirical evidence that supports this…

Downloads
2624

Abstract

Purpose

It is assumed that consumers consume games to experience hedonic and utilitarian value. However, there is no conceptual model or empirical evidence that supports this hypothesis in the game context or clarifies whether these consumption values have dual mediated or individual effects. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to model the relationship between hedonic and utilitarian consumption and game purchase and usage.

Design/methodology/approach

This research question is answered through two studies. In Study One, qualitative interviews with 18 gamers were implemented to explore the relationship between hedonic and utilitarian consumption and, game purchase and usage behaviour. In Study Two, we surveyed 493 consumers and conducted confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling across four game types to model this relationship.

Findings

The paper concludes that hedonic rather than utilitarian consumption positively impacts purchase and usage. Support was also found for the utilitarian‐hedonic dual mediation model (UHDM). Therefore, utilitarian consumption has an indirect causal effect on game purchase or usage through hedonic consumption.

Practical implications

Game development for consumers online, on wireless devices and on consoles should place greater emphasis on the practical implications of hedonic consumption. Attention could be focused on perceived enjoyment, self‐concept, self‐congruity and self‐efficacy as the primary drivers of use and purchase. Practical solutions should also be developed to develop the UHDM effect.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in the game context to explore and model the relationship between hedonic, utilitarian consumption and the UHDM effect on game purchase and usage. This paper is also unique because it provides results across four game groups: all games (ALL), Sports/Simulation/Driving (SSD), Role Playing Game/Massively Multiplayer Online Role‐Playing Game Strategy (RPG), and Action/Adventure/Fighting (AAF).

Details

Internet Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Bodo Lang and Mark Colgate

In a world of escalating competitiveness, information technology (IT), such as online banking, and relationship marketing are becoming increasingly important to marketers…

Downloads
5092

Abstract

In a world of escalating competitiveness, information technology (IT), such as online banking, and relationship marketing are becoming increasingly important to marketers. This paper investigates the impact of IT in a relationship marketing context. In particular it focuses on how customers use a combination of IT channels to interact with their financial service provider and how this interaction affects the relationship quality between the customer and the financial service provider. This study provides empirical evidence that indicates that those customers who do not exhibit an “IT gap” have more positive perceptions of their relationship with their financial service provider. These findings suggest that firms that fail to provide channels that their customers seek and value will find it more difficult to forge strong relationships with their customers – a critical condition for success in many of today’s industries.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Brian M. Young

Downloads
75

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Marylyn Carrigan, Svetla Marinova and Isabelle Szmigin

This paper is a general review contextualising the current debate on ethics and international marketing. The aim of the paper is to present an overview of historical and…

Downloads
23318

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a general review contextualising the current debate on ethics and international marketing. The aim of the paper is to present an overview of historical and current trends as a background for this special issue edition of International Marketing Review focusing on international marketing ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines how ethics in international marketing have evolved and progressed towards the current “ethics era” and presents discussion surrounding the role and value of an ethical approach towards marketing in a global marketplace.

Findings

Essentially the paper argues that marketers should creatively embrace the complex challenges of the international marketplace by rethinking their approach to marketing ethics.

Originality/value

Gives an overview of the special issue.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Markus Lampe

This study constructs a comprehensive, internationally comparative set of foreign trade data for the period 1857–1875. The dataset is constructed using information at the…

Abstract

This study constructs a comprehensive, internationally comparative set of foreign trade data for the period 1857–1875. The dataset is constructed using information at the commodity group-level and contains import and export values for the UK, France, the Zollverein, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria-Hungary, and the United States, itemised by trade partner. The study tackles three basic problems related to the heterogeneity in national statistics of the period: different definitions of aggregates, inadequate ‘official’ pricing, and the ‘proximity bias’, i.e. the misleading practice of crediting imports to bordering countries from where they physically entered, but where they did not originate. After passing successfully a consistency test, the resulting dataset contains harmonised and country of origin-corrected bilateral trade values for 7 central importers, 10 points in time, and 21 commodity groups, along with ad valorem tariff rates for all commodity groups and countries. They offer new detailed insights into the composition and evolution of trade and tariffs in the third quarter of the 19th century. Furthermore, a basic implementation of the gravity equation shows that as a consequence of the proximity bias estimates using uncorrected data are to be taken with care, especially when assessing border effects and the impact of policy variables.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-337-8

1 – 10 of 14