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Article
Publication date: 22 April 1994

Bob T. Wu, Susan M. Petroshius, Kenneth E. Crocker and James S. West

The effects of the manipulation of a promised contribution to a university and the personalization of a cover letter on response rate, response speed, and response quality…

Abstract

The effects of the manipulation of a promised contribution to a university and the personalization of a cover letter on response rate, response speed, and response quality were examined using a commercial population. The results indicate that both the promised contribution to a university and personalization increased response rate and response speed of returns. The influence of the manipulated variables on response quality was mixed. Specifically, only personalization was shown to influence response completeness while neither variable influenced respondents’ willingness to respond to questions that could be regarded assensitive. The study also revealed slight evidence of method‐specific response bias.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Stephen J. Newell, Bob T. Wu, Philip A. Titus and Susan M. Petroshius

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: are sophisticated consumers more likely to be satisfied with their purchases? Are consumers who are more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: are sophisticated consumers more likely to be satisfied with their purchases? Are consumers who are more knowledgeable more apt to feel in control of their purchase decisions? Are they more likely to believe the transaction was fair? Are they less likely to have cognitive dissonance post‐purchase?

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study examining the role of consumer sophistication on consumers' purchase satisfaction was conducted with a national sample of approximately 700 home purchasers.

Findings

The results revealed that shopping sophistication is a key determinant of whether consumers are satisfied with their purchase experience. Sophistication not only seems to affect satisfaction but also customer perceptions of control, fairness and dissonance.

Practical implications

Implications for marketing strategy and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that perception of sophistication plays a much more important role in affecting consumer purchase satisfaction than previously understood. Consequently, businesses need to be much more active in educating consumers so that they are better able to make more informed purchase decisions. Ultimately, by helping to facilitate this information flow, consumers will be more satisfied with the products and services they purchase, develop a greater loyalty to the company providing the data and be more likely to purchase similar products and services in the future.

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2006

Erdener Kaynak, Serkan Yalcin and Ekrem Tatoglu

This paper attempts to fill the knowledge gap in the area of foreign direct investment (FDI) research in the regions of Caucasus and Central Asia. Various dimensions of…

Abstract

This paper attempts to fill the knowledge gap in the area of foreign direct investment (FDI) research in the regions of Caucasus and Central Asia. Various dimensions of FDI were analyzed from a comparative perspective drawing on a number of selected case studies of inward investors in Georgia and Kyrgyz Republic. The results indicated that the FDI activity in Georgia and Kyrgyz Republic was a market‐seeking type focusing heavily on location‐specific attractions of the two countries. Although the issue of corruption affects foreign investors, it does not act as a major deterrent of FDI infl ows. The most serious problem influencing the performance of FDI firms was found to be inefficiency of local labor force, excessive bureaucracy and red tape, and differences inherent in the business practices of host countries. In general, however, it was found that foreign investors have been satisfied with their performance largely due to the relatively smooth competition and the availability of several market niches in both host country markets.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Stephen J. Newell, Duke Leingpibul, Bob Wu and Yang Jiang

Women in many countries are breaking through the gender barrier and are working in positions where they have a major impact on the buying and selling activities in…

Abstract

Purpose

Women in many countries are breaking through the gender barrier and are working in positions where they have a major impact on the buying and selling activities in business-to-business relationships. A number of studies have investigated the role gender plays in driving perceptions of sales representatives in the USA, however, little research has been undertaken on this important topic in China, one of the largest and most influential countries. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to examine whether the gender of both the buyer and seller, affects perceptions of expertise, trust and loyalty in business relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was developed, tested and used on individuals with purchasing responsibility in China. Confirmatory factor analysis was used in the pre-test and the final study data to develop and refine measurement instruments, assessing construct validity, identifying method effects and evaluating factor variance across groups. Independent t-tests were used to compare male and female buyers on their evaluation of sales reps.

Findings

The results indicate that the gender of the sales person does not seem to be a consideration for male buyers in evaluating reps in any of the variables tested. However, female buyers consistently give less favorable evaluations to female sales people than male sales representatives. The possible implications of these findings are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

First, this research uses a quantitative methodology in both the collection and analysis of the data. Thus, future studies may want to use a qualitative data set to gain a more in-depth understanding of the business-to-business relationships between men and women in the workplace. Also, as the study was concentrated on a relatively small number of business professionals from only one area in China, subsequently researchers should consider increasing the geographic domain where respondents are sampled, to help improve the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The gender bias by female buyers found in this study has several important implications for businesses in China. Specifically, the suggests that female buyers may carry with them a “collective negative bias” against other women, in this case, female sales reps. The solution to this problem is not to avoid assigning female sales reps to female buyers, rather, it is to change the negative collective social-esteem identity preconceptions. Organizations can do this through training by making women aware of their own predisposition to unfairly evaluate women that they interact with in the workplace.

Originality/value

It has been argued that gender plays a small role in perceptions of sales representatives in buyer-seller relationships. While this seems to be true in the USA, it has not (until now) been empirically tested in China. Somewhat surprisingly, the gender differences we did uncover are not from male buyers in their assessments, but from female buyers in their evaluation of women sales representatives. This result provides some interesting insight into Chinese business relationships and how some women in positions of power are more critical of other women within their sphere of influence.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Jolly Puri and Meenu Verma

This paper is focused on developing an integrated algorithmic approach named as data envelopment analysis and multicriteria decision-making (DEA-MCDM) for ranking…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is focused on developing an integrated algorithmic approach named as data envelopment analysis and multicriteria decision-making (DEA-MCDM) for ranking decision-making units (DMUs) based on cross-efficiency technique and subjective preference(s) of the decision maker.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-evaluation in data envelopment analysis (DEA) lacks in discrimination power among DMUs. To fix this, a cross-efficiency technique has been introduced that ranks DMUs based on peer-evaluation. Different cross-efficiency formulations such as aggressive and benevolent and neutral are available in the literature. The existing ranking approaches fail to incorporate subjective preference of “one” or “some” or “all” or “most” of the cross-efficiency evaluation formulations. Therefore, the integrated framework in this paper, based on DEA and multicriteria decision-making (MCDM), aims to present a ranking approach to incorporate different cross-efficiency formulations as well as subjective preference(s) of decision maker.

Findings

The proposed approach has an advantage that each of the aggressive, benevolent and neutral cross-efficiency formulations contribute to select the best alternative among the DMUs in a MCDM problem. Ordered weighted averaging (OWA) aggregation is applied to aggregate final cross-efficiencies and to achieve complete ranking of the DMUs. This new approach is further illustrated and compared with existing MCDM approaches like simple additive weighting (SAW) and Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) to prove its validity in real situations.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of cross-efficiency formulation(s) as per subjective preference of the decision maker and different orness levels lead to different aggregated scores and thus ranking of the DMUs accordingly. The proposed ranking approach is highly useful in real applications like R and D projects, flexible manufacturing systems, electricity distribution sector, banking industry, labor assignment and the economic environmental performances for ranking and benchmarking.

Practical implications

To prove the practical applicability and robustness of the proposed integrated DEA-MCDM approach, it is applied to top twelve Indian banks in terms of three inputs and two outputs for the period 2018–2019. The findings of the study (1) ensure the impact of non-performing assets (NPAs) on the ranking of the selected banks and (2) are enormously valuable for the bank experts and policy makers to consider the impact of peer-evaluation and subjective preference(s) in formulating appropriate policies to improve performance and ranks of underperformed banks in competitive scenario.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has integrated both DEA and MCDM via OWA aggregation to present a ranking approach that can incorporate different cross-efficiency formulations and subjective preference(s) of the decision maker for ranking DMUs.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Qingyuan Zhu, Xingchen Li, Feng Li and Alireza Amirteimoori

Merger and acquisitions (M&A) is a process of restructuring two or more companies into one, a process that occurs frequently in many companies. Previous studies on M&A…

Abstract

Purpose

Merger and acquisitions (M&A) is a process of restructuring two or more companies into one, a process that occurs frequently in many companies. Previous studies on M&A mainly paid attention to the potential gains from a merger, while ignored the problem of how to select the partners to merge. This paper aims to select the best partner from different candidates for a given company to merge.

Design/methodology/approach

Each company's historical data are used to identify each company's own production technology. With resources change, each company's new operation is restricted by its own production technology. Then, a 0–1 integer programming is proposed to select the best partner for M&A.

Findings

The banking industry involving 27 China's commercial banks is given to verify the applicability of our proposed model. The study shows the best partner selection for each bank company.

Originality/value

On the theoretical side, the study uses each company's own historical data to construct its own production technology to compressively reflect the production change after M&A. On the practical side, the study uses the proposed model to help the 27 commercial banks in China to select their best merger partner.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Anupama Prashar

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the application of Six Sigma/design of experiments (DOE) hybrid framework for improving damping force (DF) generation process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the application of Six Sigma/design of experiments (DOE) hybrid framework for improving damping force (DF) generation process in a shock absorber assembly unit.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study research method with single case (holistic) design. This research design was found to be appropriate for testing the projected framework for integrating DOE approaches within Six Sigma define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) cycle. In the proposed framework, Shainin’s component search technique (CST) was deployed at the “analysis” phase of DMAIC for the first stage filtering of process parameters, followed by the use of Taguchi orthogonal arrays (OA) at the “improve” phase for identifying the optimal setting of the parameters.

Findings

The application of Shanin CST facilitated in ascertaining that assembly component (piston with rebound stopper) was causing the variation and not the assembly process. Further, the use of Taguchi OA at the improve phase allowed the collection of necessary data to determine the significant piston parameters with minimum experimentation (eight experimental runs in this case as opposed to the expected 64) and analysis of variance on the collected data facilitated the selection of parameter settings to optimize the “critical to quality”, i.e. rebound DF.

Originality/value

This study provided a stimulus for wider application of integrated DOE approaches by the engineering community in the problem solving and the identification of parameters responsible for poor performance of the process.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Kaidi Wu and David Dunning

Purpose – Are members of socially dominant groups aware of the privileges they enjoy? We address this question by applying the notion of hypocognition to social privilege…

Abstract

Purpose – Are members of socially dominant groups aware of the privileges they enjoy? We address this question by applying the notion of hypocognition to social privilege. Hypocognition is defined as lacking a rich cognitive or linguistic representation (i.e., a schema) of a concept in question. By social privilege, we refer to advantages that members of dominant social groups enjoy because of their group membership. We argue that such group members are hypocognitive of the privilege they enjoy. They have little cognitive representation of it. As a consequence, their social advantage is invisible to them.

Approach – We provide a narrative review of recent empirical work demonstrating and explaining this lack of expertise and knowledge in socially dominant groups (e.g., White People, men) about discrimination and disadvantage encountered by other groups (e.g., Black People, Asian Americans, women), relative what members of those other groups know.

Findings – This lack of expertise or knowledge is revealed by classic cognitive psychological measures. Relative to members of other groups, social dominant group members generate fewer examples of discrimination that other groups confront, remember fewer instances after being presented a list of them, and are slower to respond when classifying whether these examples are discriminatory.

Social Implications – These classic measures of cognitive expertise about social privilege predict social attitude differences between social groups, specifically whether people perceive the existence of social privilege as well as believe discrimination still exists in contemporary society. Hypocognition of social privilege also carries implications for informal interventions (e.g., acting “colorblind”) that are popularly discussed.

1 – 10 of 157