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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Dawn Edge

The purpose of this study was to explore providers' and commissioners' perceptions of the extent to which services currently meet the perinatal mental health needs of black

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore providers' and commissioners' perceptions of the extent to which services currently meet the perinatal mental health needs of black and minority ethnic (BME) women. A mixed method study involving a national survey and in‐depth interviews was undertaken in response to reports of patchy service provision and particular concerns about potentially unmet needs among BME women. Findings indicate that the surprising number of professional groups (n=27) involved in delivering perinatal mental health care were predominantly located in secondary care. Perceptions of the validity of ‘BME‐specific’ services were equivocal. Service delivery for minority women tended to focus on language and translation; which might facilitate assessment and physical (though not psychological) care but would do little to address women's cultural needs.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Zarrina Kurtz and Cathy Street

Research has highlighted problems in accessing mental health services for people from minority ethnic groups. Much of this literature is focused on adults. The Minority

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Abstract

Research has highlighted problems in accessing mental health services for people from minority ethnic groups. Much of this literature is focused on adults. The Minority Voices study aimed to identify and describe the perceptions and use of mental health services from the viewpoint of black and minority ethnic (BME) young people aged between 12 and 25 in England and Wales, and to examine initiatives designed to improve the access to, and acceptability of, services for these young people. It used a mixed methods approach, including a literature review, national service mapping, in‐depth interviews and focus groups in four sample areas and action research in preparing materials designed by BME young people. A number of issues that impede access to services, and that are specific to them, were identified and explored with young people from BME groups. These include concerns related to discrimination and racism, confidentiality, family and community pressures, uncertainty about any help they may receive, and marked fears of the stigma that surrounds mental health difficulties. Within services, a lack of capacity of targeted services and of cultural competence were highlighted. The research concluded that there is a need to improve awareness of mental health and information about services among BME communities, and for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) to work with these communities to explore ways in which acceptable and appropriate mental health expertise can be made more readily available through both informal and mainstream provision.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Ajit Shah

The black and ethnic minority (BME) elderly population in England and Wales is increasing. As dementia is an age‐related disorder and the prevalence of depression in old…

Abstract

The black and ethnic minority (BME) elderly population in England and Wales is increasing. As dementia is an age‐related disorder and the prevalence of depression in old age is high, the absolute number of cases of dementia and depression will increase among BME elders. This has implications for the development and delivery of old age psychiatry services (OAPSs) for BME elders. Demographic data pertaining to the elderly from BME groups in the 2001 population census were analysed in detail to evaluate the implications for development and delivery of OAPSs for BME elders. The demographic changes identified have important future implications for the development and delivery of OAPSs for BME elders. Unless they are addressed systematically, BME elders will continue to harbour untreated, hidden psychiatric morbidity. Strategies to ensure that this vulnerable group of elderly are identified and provided with accessible, acceptable and culturally sensitive OAPSs should be developed.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Ajit Shah

The proportion of those over the age of 65 years in black and minority ethnic (BME) groups in England and Wales is increasing. The prevalence of dementia and depression…

Abstract

The proportion of those over the age of 65 years in black and minority ethnic (BME) groups in England and Wales is increasing. The prevalence of dementia and depression among BME elders from different groups in the United Kingdom is generally similar to or higher than in indigenous white British elders. Two methods were used to provide a conservative estimate of the absolute number of cases of dementia and depression among BME elders. Data on prevalence from published studies of different BME elderly groups and the number of those over the age of 65 years from different BME groups in the general population in the 2001 population census were used for analysis. The most conservative estimates of the absolute number of cases of dementia among BME elders were 7270 and 10,786 for the two methods of analysis; the corresponding figures for depression were 33,559 and 52,980. There is a significant amount of psychiatric morbidity among the elderly from BME groups. A multi‐faceted approach is needed to ensure that commissioning, design, development and delivery of culturally capable, appropriate and sensitive old age psychiatry actually occurs and improves the equity of service access by BME elders.

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International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2010

Florence Cantle

Perinatal mental health is a major concern among women of childbearing age. Women from a black and minority ethnic background are widely believed to have particular needs…

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Abstract

Perinatal mental health is a major concern among women of childbearing age. Women from a black and minority ethnic background are widely believed to have particular needs that are often not given the attention they deserve. NHS Croydon launched a perinatal mental health project to develop a closer and better partnership between the Primary Care Trust (PCT), Croydon Council and black and minority ethnic (BME) voluntary organisations through an action learning approach. Experience was shared to improve engagement and use of health services by mothers from BME communities in Croydon who had encountered mental health problems during pregnancy or following childbirth. By exploring and identifying such issues and problems, the action learning set endeavoured to find solutions for a joined‐up approach to achieve identifiable benefits. Some problems were encountered, such as a lack of communication between health professionals and BME community groups. The learning outcomes were to raise awareness and to recognise the cultural differences with mothers of BME background experiencing perinatal mental health problems. The learning from the project will be disseminated to a wider audience to promote best practice.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

V.S. Kalra, P. Abel and A. Esmail

The National Health Service (NHS) is the largest employer in the UK but, despite decades of equal opportunities legislation, its senior management workforce does not…

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Abstract

Purpose

The National Health Service (NHS) is the largest employer in the UK but, despite decades of equal opportunities legislation, its senior management workforce does not reflect the diversity of either the wider NHS workforce or the UK population. The aim of the paper is to consider the range of management interventions available to organisations like the NHS to deliver change in the area of promotion of Black and minority ethnic staff.

Design/methodology/approach

Intervention programmes in a range of public and private organisations are reviewed and the nature of barriers to promotion and the range of interventions to overcome these are explored. The paper uses the paradigm of institutional racism to examine the ways in which the NHS discriminates against certain sections of its workforce. The methods used include a literature review combined with key stakeholder interviews. A comparative dimension which involved a review of research on leadership initiatives in the USA was also undertaken.

Findings

The literature review found that there were a range of initiatives which could be implemented by public organisations such as the NHS to increase the presence of Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) staff in senior management positions. Most of these interventions were largely focused on the individual. Much more progress on institutional or organisational change needed to be made before the NHS could be perceived as a model employer in this area. The literature review also indicated that there is little published research on such initiatives within other European Union countries.

Originality/value

The paper is targeted at both policy makers and human resource officers responsible for equality and diversity issues within large organisations, who have a remit to improve the career pathways of staff. The analysis provided offers a set of critical tools and interventions that have not hitherto been well examined in the UK context.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Lauri Johnson and Rosemary Campbell‐Stephens

The aim of this paper is to discuss the views of black and ethnic minority school leaders about the Investing in Diversity program, a black‐led program developed in 2004…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the views of black and ethnic minority school leaders about the Investing in Diversity program, a black‐led program developed in 2004 to address the underrepresentation of black leaders in the London schools. Major themes are identified from interviews with black and South Asian women graduates of the program and recommendations made for leadership development strategies to help aspiring and current black and global majority headteachers “bring who they are” to their leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case study data about the Investing in Diversity program include document analysis of curriculum modules and participant observation of the weekend residential, survey satisfaction data from several cohorts, and face‐to‐face interviews with a purposive sample of seven headteachers from African Caribbean, African, and South Asian backgrounds who completed the Investing in Diversity program six‐seven years ago. These semi‐structured individual interviews were conducted in the spring of 2012 during an all‐day visit to their schools and focused on barriers and supports in their career path, approach to leadership, and their views on their leadership preparation.

Findings

Participants identified black and ethnic minority headteachers as role models, the importance of mentoring and informal networks, and opportunities to lead as supports to their career path to headship. Many of their long‐term informal networks were established with other BME colleagues who attended Investing in Diversity. Barriers included subtle (and not so subtle) discrimination from parents, teachers, and administrators for some of the participants.

Research limitations/implications

Observational studies and interview studies, which included a bigger sample of black and ethnic minority headteachers, would extend this research.

Practical implications

This study provides suggestions for schools and local authorities about leadership preparation strategies that make a difference for aspiring BME leaders.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of research on the views of British BME headteachers. This study adds to the research base on BME leadership development in Britain and contributes to international research on self‐defined black leadership perspectives.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Shereen Hussein, Jill Manthorpe and Mohamed Ismail

The aim of this paper is to explore the effect of ethnicity and separate this from the other dynamics associated with migration among members of the long-term care…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the effect of ethnicity and separate this from the other dynamics associated with migration among members of the long-term care workforce in England focusing on the nature and structure of their jobs. The analysis examines interactions between ethnicity, gender, and age, and their relations with “meso” factors related to job and organizational characteristics and “macro” level factors related to local area characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses new national workforce data, the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care (NMDS-SC), n=357,869. The paper employs descriptive statistical analysis and a set of logistic regression models.

Findings

The results indicate that labour participation of British black and minority ethnic (BME) groups in long-term care work is much lower than previously believed. There are variations in nature of work and possibly job security by ethnicity.

Research limitations/implications

While the national sample is large, the data were not purposively collected to examine differentials in reasons to work in the care sector by different ethnicity.

Practical implications

The analysis highlights the potential to actively promote social care work among British BME groups to meet workforce shortages, especially at a time where immigration policies are restricting the recruitment of non-European Economic Area nationals.

Originality/value

The analysis provides a unique insight into the participation of British BME workers in the long-term care sector, separate from that of migrant workers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Jill Manthorpe, Jo Moriarty, Martin Stevens, Shereen Hussein and Nadira Sharif

There is a shortage of examples of arrangements and practice approaches that focus on mental wellbeing in black and minority ethnic (BME) older people. This article draws…

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Abstract

There is a shortage of examples of arrangements and practice approaches that focus on mental wellbeing in black and minority ethnic (BME) older people. This article draws on our practice enquiry1, which brought together accounts of social care practice across different types of social care settings from four parts of the UK, away from the areas of high demographic concentration that have been the focus of most previous research. Over 80 practitioners, managers, older people and carers were interviewed over 2009‐2010. They described and reflected on the support for older people from BME backgrounds, particularly focusing on how they might promote mental well‐being.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

1 – 10 of 418