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Article

Pranav Chauhan, Arun K. Das, P.K. Nanda, Vishal Kumbhar and J.P. Yadav

Black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) is well known for its strong, hot, peppery taste and has many nutritional, pharmaceutical and traditional therapeutic uses. The aim of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) is well known for its strong, hot, peppery taste and has many nutritional, pharmaceutical and traditional therapeutic uses. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effect of different solvent extracts of black cumin seed to retard lipid and protein oxidation in raw ground pork meat during refrigerated storage (4 ± 1°C) for nine days.

Design/methodology/approach

Black cumin extracts (BCEs) were prepared using different solvents, namely, ethanol, water, ethanol:water (60:40) and methanol:hot water (60:40). Extracts were analysed for total phenolic content (TPC), 1,1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and reducing power. Based on the results, water extract (WE) and ethanol–water extract (EHWE) of black cumin were selected and incorporated at 1.5 per cent into freshly minced pork meat and compared with a synthetic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 100 ppm), in retarding lipid and protein oxidation. Treated and control samples were aerobically packed in low-density polyethylene bags for analysis of various parameters (pH, colour and odour score, peroxide, lipid and protein oxidation) during nine-day refrigerated storage study.

Findings

Results showed that BCEs had a good amount of TPC (4.4-7.4 mg gallic acid equivalents/g) and also DPPH scavenging activities (33.96-44.23 per cent), with WE and EHWE extracts showing highest reducing power and promising antioxidant capacity. Hence, BCEs (WE and EHWE) incorporated at 1.5 per cent into freshly minced pork meat was tested, compared to BHT (100 ppm) and control samples, in retarding lipid and protein oxidation during storage. In BCE-treated samples, thiobarbituric acid reacting substances, free fatty acids, peroxide, formation of protein carbonyls and off-odour or rancid odour development were lower than control and values were comparable with BHT. Incorporation of BCE did not negatively affect the colour of ground pork.

Originality/value

BCEs (WE and EHWE) at 1.5 per cent inhibited protein and lipid oxidation and it could be exploited commercially as an effective alternative in retarding oxidative deterioration of meat products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Muhammad Tauseef Sultan, Masood Sadiq Butt, Farhan Saeed and Rizwana Batool

Nigella sativa L. (black cumin) has a unique nutritional profile that can be employed in food formulation to improve health of consumers. Black cumin is already used in…

Abstract

Purpose

Nigella sativa L. (black cumin) has a unique nutritional profile that can be employed in food formulation to improve health of consumers. Black cumin is already used in traditional medicines in Pakistan to treat various maladies like diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal disorders, and as immune booster. The core objective of the present research study is to explore the role of black cumin fixed oil (BCFO) as a functional ingredient in cereal‐based bakery products.

Design/methodology/approach

The BCFO was supplemented in cookies' formulations and impact on nutritive quality, tocopherols and thymoquinone contents was studied.

Findings

The results indicated that addition of fixed oil influenced the physical characteristics of cookies significantly. Chemical attributes varied non‐significantly, but oxidative stability of the cookies was improved as indicated from decreased peroxide (POV) and TBA value. Gradual increase in BCFO in cookies formulations increased the amounts of total tocopherols significantly from 9.85 ± 0.392 to 53.19 ± 1.689 mg/kg‐oil. BCFO addition significantly enhanced α‐, β‐, γ‐, δ‐tocopherols i.e. 8.80±0.630 to 32.19±1.410, 0.96±0.035 to 3.47±0.114, 0.09 ± 0.000 to 14.98 ± 0.520, 0.00 ± 0.000 to 2.55 ± 0.127 mg/kg‐oil, respectively. Likewise, thymoquinone contents were recorded highest in cookies containing 5.0 @ BCFO (7.25 ± 0.482 mg/100 g) as compared to control. Moreover, cookies containing fixed oil @ 4% rated better on hedonic scale as compared with control by the trained taste panel during sensory evaluation.

Originality/value

The results of present research paved the way for the commercial applications of BCFO especially in cereal‐based products. Moreover, present intervention heightened the prospects of using black cumin seed oil in different food products that may produce healthy impact on end consumers.

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Article

Simranjeet Kaur, Sunil Kumar, Z. F. Bhat and Arvind Kumar

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effect of pomegranate seed powder, grape seed extract and tomato powder on the quality characteristics of chicken nuggets…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effect of pomegranate seed powder, grape seed extract and tomato powder on the quality characteristics of chicken nuggets during refrigerated storage.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed to evaluate the effect of pomegranate seed powder, grape seed extract and tomato powder on the storage quality parameters of chicken nuggets. The products were developed by incorporating optimum level of pomegranate seed powder (3 per cent), grape seed extract (0.3 per cent) and tomato powder (2 per cent) separately and were aerobically packaged in low-density polyethylene pouches and assessed for various storage quality parameters under refrigerated (4±1°C) conditions for 21 days of storage. The products were evaluated for various physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory parameters at regular intervals of 0, 7, 14 and 21 days.

Findings

A significant (p < 0.05) effect of pomegranate seed powder, grape seed extract and tomato powder was observed on the pH and thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (mg malondialdehyde/kg) values of the chicken nuggets. A significant (p < 0.05) effect was also observed on the microbiological characteristics, as the products incorporated with pomegranate seed powder, grape seed extract and tomato powder showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower values for total plate count, psychrophilic count and yeast and mould count during the period of storage. Coliforms were not detected throughout the period of storage. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher scores were observed for various sensory parameters of the products incorporated with pomegranate seed powder (3 per cent), grape seed extract (0.3 per cent) and tomato powder (2 per cent).

Originality/value

Pomegranate seed powder (3 per cent), grape seed extract (0.3 per cent) and tomato powder (2 per cent) successfully improved the oxidative stability and storage quality of the products during refrigerated (4±1°C) storage and may be commercially exploited to improve the storage quality of muscle foods without adversely affecting the sensory quality of the products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Abigail Kelble

The paper is a review of current research on phytochemicals and how they may alleviate type 2 diabetes by improving insulin activity in the body.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper is a review of current research on phytochemicals and how they may alleviate type 2 diabetes by improving insulin activity in the body.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature searches were conducted to find a link between common household spices and type 2 diabetes. Only common household spices were researched so that any link found between spices and type 2 diabetes could lead to practical home‐based recommendations for changes in a person's diet.

Findings

Cinnamon, garlic, ginger, basil, oregano, nutmeg, tea, bay leaf, allspice, curry, and others were found to play a role in lowering blood glucose, increasing insulin sensitivity, and increasing glucose synthesis in response to food intake. In addition, these spices may improve blood circulation, decrease platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, and act as blood vessel protectants, ameliorating the cardiovascular disease often associated with type 2 diabetes. To gain these benefits, only average amounts commonly used in foods are necessary, such as amounts usually sprinkled in foods or amounts used in recipes. At high concentrated doses, the advantages to utilizing spices may be inhibited.

Originality/value

The findings that phytochemicals in common household spices can improve insulin activity in the body present a more natural way to possibly treat and prevent type 2 diabetes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article

Muhammad Nadeem, Faqir Muhammad Anjum, Muhammad Issa Khan, Saima Tehseen, Ahmed El‐Ghorab and Javed Iqbal Sultan

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of multiple functions of the coriander plant, including its nutritional and nutraceutical benefits, with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of multiple functions of the coriander plant, including its nutritional and nutraceutical benefits, with special reference to linalool.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertake a literature review of the coriander plant's history, chemical composition of coriander parts and its oil, and their nutraceutical potential. Various phytopharmacological appraisals have been discussed at length to investigate their important potential.

Findings

Coriander is an annual, herbaceous plant which originated from the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern regions and known as medicinal plants. Coriander contains an essential oil (0.03‐2.6%). The different parts of this plant contain monoterpenes, limpnene, α‐pinene, γ‐terpinene, p‐cymene, citronellol, borneol, camphor, coriandrin, geraniol, dihydrocoriandrin, coriandronsA‐E, flavonoids and essential oils. It is used as a stomachic, spasmolytic and carminative which have a greater bioactive property. Various parts of this plant, such as seeds, leaves, flower and fruit, possess antioxidant activity, diuretic, anti‐convulsant anti‐diabetic activity, sedative hypnotic activity, anti‐mutagenic, anti‐microbial activity, anthelmintic activity. The physical properties, chemical composition and bioactivity affect the coriander's commercial value.

Research limitations/implications

Currently available information on coriander seeds and leaves is insufficient. These observations have led to continuing research aimed at identifying specific bioactive components in foods, such as antioxidants, which may be responsible for improving and maintaining health. Antioxidants are present in foods as vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and polyphenols. Coriander is also rich in such compounds. Research supports that some of these foods, as part of an overall healthful diet, have the potential to delay the onset of many age‐related diseases, so there is urgent need to explore the role of these compounds.

Originality/value

This review is unique in its comprehensive nature and reflects the importance of coriander as a medicinal food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

M. Abdullah Dar

The purpose of this paper is to make people aware of organic corrosion inhibitors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make people aware of organic corrosion inhibitors.

Design/methodology/approach

As it is a literature review paper, no specific method is used.

Findings

It has been found that plant extracts and oils show inhibition efficiency up to 98 percent, so it is certain that plant extracts and oils are effective corrosion inhibitors and can be successfully used at the industrial level.

Research limitations/implications

Plant extracts and oils are also found to be non‐toxic, highly efficient, renewable and cheap. But less effort has been given towards the identification of which compound is active in the extract.

Originality/value

The paper shows detailed account of the inhibitors obtained from plants, which are used as natural corrosion inhibitors.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article

Simranjeet Kaur, Sunil Kumar and Z. F. Bhat

– The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of utilization of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the development of fiber-enriched chicken nuggets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of utilization of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the development of fiber-enriched chicken nuggets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed to incorporate and evaluate the effect of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder on the quality characteristics of the chicken nuggets. The products were developed by incorporating different levels of pomegranate seed powder (1, 2, 3 per cent) and tomato powder (1, 2, 3 per cent) separately and were analyzed for various physicochemical and sensory parameters.

Findings

The pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder significantly (p < 0.05) increased the fiber content of the chicken nuggets besides improving various sensory attributes of the products. A significant (p < 0.05) effect of the pomegranate seed powder was observed on the pH, emulsion stability, cooking yield and proximate parameters of the chicken nuggets. Tomato powder also showed a significant (p < 0.05) effect on the emulsion stability, moisture and fat content of the products. No significant (p > 0.05) effect of tomato was observed on the pH and cooking yield of the products.

Originality/value

Fiber-enriched chicken nuggets could be developed by incorporating pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the formulation besides improving various sensory attributes of the products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

The following definitions and standards for food products have been adopted as a guide for the officials of this Department in enforcing the Food and Drugs Act. These are…

Abstract

The following definitions and standards for food products have been adopted as a guide for the officials of this Department in enforcing the Food and Drugs Act. These are standards of identity and are not to be confused with standards of quality or grade; they are so framed as to exclude substances not mentioned in the definition and in each instance imply that the product is clean and sound. These definitions and standards include those published in S. R. A., F. D. 2, revision 4, and those adopted October 28, 1936.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

The following is a brief outline of what seem to us the main points of the Act:—

Abstract

The following is a brief outline of what seem to us the main points of the Act:—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Attention has often been directed to the fact that much unwrapped bread becomes dangerously dirty by the time it is consumed, and there is now a considerable body of…

Abstract

Attention has often been directed to the fact that much unwrapped bread becomes dangerously dirty by the time it is consumed, and there is now a considerable body of opinion in favour of making the wrapping compulsory. The hygienic advantages of this are unquestionable; for although a loaf may be of a high standard of purity on leaving the factory, there are ways by which much contamination may occur subsequently. There are dangers, beyond the control of Sanitary Authorities, arising from contamination by dirty hands, clothing, baskets and carts; the dust from streets, doorsteps and window sills; and from the organisms of disease harboured by apparently healthy “carriers” of infection; and very often pieces of crust are given to little children to bite upon, in order to aid the development of their teeth and gums.—Dr. G. H. Dart (the Medical Officer of Health for Hackney) has recently emphasised the fact that there is much typhoid and paratyphoid fever, and other disturbances of health, which occur without any source of infection being traced; and he maintains that it is a reasonable assumption that some of this infection results from our failure to adopt measures for safeguarding the cleanliness of bread. From a small investigation upon five loaves, it was found recently that four of them yielded bacteriological results that testified to gross contamination—a number of streptocococci, staphylococci and coliform organisms having been found upon each of the four loaves. It will not be disputed that the value of the precautions adopted, even in the most hygienic bakeries, may be greatly discounted by the failure to protect the bread from contamination in its subsequent passage to the consumer; and it seems—to say the least of it—inconsistent, to provide against the contamination of meat (as by the 1924 Meat Regulations)—an article of food which is cooked before consumption—and to ignore the contamination of bread which is eaten as delivered to the purchaser. That bread can be wrapped without loss of flavour and at little cost has been demonstrated in America and by some bakers in England. In a useful paper by C. H. F. Fuller, B.Sc, A.I.C., Research Laboratories, Messrs. J. Lyons & Co., Ltd., which appeared in the last issue of the Journal of the Royal Sanitary Institute, attention is drawn to the fact that it is possible, by the employment of a waxed paper wrapping, largely to eliminate moisture loss from the loaf, and thus to secure a loaf which remains longer in a palatable condition, owing to delay in the onset of staling; but before wrapping, the loaf must be cooled until the centre attains a temperature not far beyond that of the outside air, in order to avoid the occurrence of “sweating,” i.e., deposition of moisture on the crust and inside of the wrapper. He also refutes the contention that the wrapping of bread necessarily leads to the absorption of foreign flavours from the wax or paper; for trouble from these causes is avoidable if suitable measures are adopted. Indeed, the whole subject of bread wrapping has been submitted to a close examination by a number of investigators; and in general there is agreement among them that no deleterious effect upon the quality of the bread results, and that the public would benefit from the resulting improvement in cleanliness, freshness and palatability. The hygienic considerations in reference to bread apply also to all exposed food which is not washed, peeled, cooked or treated in same way which removes dirt or renders it safe for consumption. The obvious remedy for the dangers involved by our neglect is to press for legal powers to enforce the necessary precautions and to educate public opinion upon the need for these.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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