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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Roger John Hilton and Amrik Sohal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the successful deployment of Lean Six Sigma and a number of key explanatory variables that essentially…

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7862

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the successful deployment of Lean Six Sigma and a number of key explanatory variables that essentially comprise the competence of the organization, the competence of the deployment facilitator and the competence of the project leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The preliminary fieldwork involved interviews with two senior Master Black Belts; then, combined with the results of a literature review, the authors develop a conceptual model. A number of hypotheses are developed and the procedures involved in empirically testing these hypotheses are briefly explained.

Findings

Technical and interpersonal attributes of Black Belts and Master Black Belts are identified as well as the factors for success in deploying Lean Six Sigma. These factors relate to: leadership, communication, behavior and awareness of Six Sigma; policies, culture and organizational support and strategy; education, training and competency of the Six Sigma experts; project improvement teams and project management; and performance evaluations based on quality criteria, information systems, data and measurement.

Originality/value

The paper produces a predictive model for the successful deployment of a continuous improvement program such as Lean Six Sigma.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Sarah Ingle and Willo Roe

Examines different approaches that can be utilised to introduce a Six Sigma Black Belt programme. Compares and contrasts the implementation strategies used in both…

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4976

Abstract

Examines different approaches that can be utilised to introduce a Six Sigma Black Belt programme. Compares and contrasts the implementation strategies used in both Motorola and General Electric. Provides information based on a literature review as well as interview evidence from employees in both firms. Concludes by defining the overall approach used by each company. The benefits as well as some criticisms of the Six Sigma and Black Belt methodology are also provided, and we warn about the dangers of focusing on the metric rather than the mission.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Ram Alagan, Robert O. White and Seela Aladuwaka

This research underlines the usefulness of Civil Rights Geographic Information Systems (CR-GIS) for understanding the social struggles and assessing the critical needs of…

Abstract

This research underlines the usefulness of Civil Rights Geographic Information Systems (CR-GIS) for understanding the social struggles and assessing the critical needs of the disempowered population of Alabama’s “Black Belt.” The social struggles have been persistent for decades in the Southern states, particularly in Alabama. Researchers have recognized the political and historical root causes and implications for these social struggles. The geographic region of Alabama’s Black Belt is significant because it became the epicenter of the Civil Rights struggle and still represents the vestiges of the social policy known as “Jim Crow.”

Although GIS has a great potential to explore social and political struggles, currently, it is not profoundly associated with Civil Rights studies. This research employs CR-GIS to illustrate the impact of the disfranchisement caused by biased geopolitics in three selected cases/issues: (1) gerrymandering and voting rights, (2) transportation, and (3) poverty in the State of Alabama. While there has been some progress in overcoming the social struggles in the Black Belt, there is a need for qualitative and quantitative analyses to understand persistent social, economic, and Civil Rights struggles in the region. GIS could be a valuable tool to understand and explore the social struggles in the disempowered communities of the “Black Belt” in Alabama. By incorporating the existing information and conducting ground truth studies, this research will lay the basic foundation for extended research by creating a policy template for empowering the disempowered for better social, economic, and political integration in the “Black Belt region.”

Details

Environment, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-775-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Rodney E. Stanley and Gary L. Peevely

The state of Tennessee is part of the United States that houses a special set of school districts known as the Black Belt. Named for the black fertile land, utilized for…

Abstract

The state of Tennessee is part of the United States that houses a special set of school districts known as the Black Belt. Named for the black fertile land, utilized for the agricultural industry for hundreds of years in the south, these school districts have the lowest levels of achievement among the one hundred and thirty six school districts in Tennessee. The purpose of this study is to identify just how extensive these achievement discrepancies are between Black Belt school students and non-Black Belt school students by answering the following research question: are Black Belt school students disproportionately scoring lower on college admittance exams (ACT) than students in non-Black Belt school districts? The data for this study was gathered from the Tennessee Report Card for Education over a period of ten years. Pooled time series cross-sectional regression analysis was the datatesting device employed in the study. The findings suggest that Black Belt students are disproportionately scoring lower on college admittance exams compared to non-Black Belt students. Policymakers need to use caution when generalizing this study because it only represents those Black Belt school districts in Tennessee.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

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1228

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Tricia J. Stewart and Nicole DeRonck

The Black Belt of the Deep South with rural areas in the states of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi has historically faced challenges that come with rural isolation…

Abstract

The Black Belt of the Deep South with rural areas in the states of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi has historically faced challenges that come with rural isolation, limited industry and financial services, poor healthcare options, and lack of educational opportunities. In the early 1990s, some institutions of higher education, including Historically Black Colleges and Universities, sought to increase educational opportunities for African Americans living in these areas. This chapter provides a historic case study of a doctoral education program that was founded to increase the number of education leaders, especially African Americans with advanced degrees, who would work in Alabama. As a historic case study, it provides a general overview of the founding of the program including mission and vision, a retrospective of the types of opportunities provided to doctoral students, and reflections on ways in which the program has improved the students' professional practices from both faculty and students. One component of this retrospective is to trace those students living in and working in the Alabama Black Belt. A key understanding undergirding the importance of this work is that as school administrators educational knowledge levels increase, so does the personal knowledge base that they can contribute to the communities in which they live and work. In this way, the educational reach of the doctor of education program leads to improvements in the larger Alabama Black Belt through both community and P-12 school interactions.

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Mohamad Reeduan Mustapha, Fauziah Abu Hasan and Mohd Shaladdin Muda

This paper aims to report the results of a study on the implementation of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in a developing country. The purpose of this paper is to determine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the results of a study on the implementation of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in a developing country. The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers, critical success factors (CSFs) and implementation strategy of LSS.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was taken, in which a multiple-case study designed to gather data on the LSS implementation process was used.

Findings

The literature and interviews show that any organization can customize these methodologies according to their needs. This also indicates that there are no stringent rules to follow, and that the process of adoption and implementation is quite flexible. The findings from the multiple-case study identify that the CSFs for implementing LSS are management support and commitment, communication, culture change, education and training and a recognition and reward system. The salient features which serve as barriers are lack of top management commitment, lack of knowledge, lack of training, and internal resistance.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for consultants and practitioners with regard to the implementation of LSS within organizations and to focus on the selection LSS tools for implementation.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the implementation of LSS in Malaysia can be valuable to consultants, practitioners and researchers of LSS in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Carsten Svensson, Jiju Antony, Mohamed Ba-Essa, Majed Bakhsh and Saja Albliwi

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the body of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) knowledge within the field of higher education institutions. The paper will review the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the body of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) knowledge within the field of higher education institutions. The paper will review the initial phase of an implementation and highlight future challenges of applying the LSS method in a complex transactional environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The observations presented in this paper originate from rolling out a large LSS implementation at a recently established university. The paper is supported with secondary data from literature.

Findings

The implementation of LSS methodology at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology has resulted in improvements in business processes and efficiency. This has been achieved through project execution and training programs. Approximately 350 staff members have completed awareness training, 50 yellow belts and 150 green belts have been trained, and the first round of seven black belts have completed training of which two have completed certification.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on an empirical study of a single instance and the authors’ experiences as practitioners.

Originality/value

This paper is the first description of what is believed to be one of the largest implementations of LSS in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Kim Buch and Ann Tolentino

This paper examined employee perceptions of the rewards associated with their participation in a six sigma program. Six sigma is an approach to organizational change that…

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7418

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examined employee perceptions of the rewards associated with their participation in a six sigma program. Six sigma is an approach to organizational change that incorporates elements of total quality management, business process reengineering, and employee involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by 215 employees (34 percent response rate). Respondents rated the extent to which they felt their participation in six sigma was “instrumental” for a range of outcomes, as well as valence (desirability) of each outcome (based on the VIE concept of instrumentality). The outcomes were classified into four categories: extrinsic, intrinsic, social, and organizational.

Findings

Valence ratings revealed that all 12 outcomes were perceived as desirable. Instrumentality ratings showed that extrinsic outcomes were rated significantly lower than intrinsic, social, and organizational outcomes. Additional analyses revealed significant differences on all four outcome categories between participants and non‐participants in the six sigma program.

Practical implications

The positive valence and instrumentality ratings for participants indicate they believe their participation will lead to valued outcomes for themselves and their organizations. However, employees who choose not to get involved in six sigma do not perceive that their participation would have led to desired outcomes. The results also show that while participants value extrinsic rewards, they do not see six sigma as instrumental in their receipt. These perceptions have important implications for attracting and retaining program participants.

Originality/value

While much has been written about the use of reward systems in supporting a successful six sigma effort, this study empirically examines how employees actually perceive the rewards associated with their participation. It also identifies which types of rewards are most instrumental for participants and non‐participants.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

A continuous flow of flawless products and services is the holy grail of all companies. Over the years various strategies, such as TQM, have been proposed to improve…

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1987

Abstract

A continuous flow of flawless products and services is the holy grail of all companies. Over the years various strategies, such as TQM, have been proposed to improve processes and output. Six Sigma, developed by the Motorola Corporation, is one of the most recent and far‐reaching quality programs. It uses a range of techniques to measure and improve performance. This article examines the way the program was implemented in Motorola and in General Electric.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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