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1 – 10 of 14
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Jonathan Ee, Jan Mei Lim, Biza Stenfert Kroese and John Rose

This study aims to explore the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities in Singapore receiving inpatient mental health treatment. To date, there has not been…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities in Singapore receiving inpatient mental health treatment. To date, there has not been any research that examines the views and experiences of this population in Singapore. The research examines how the participants view their mental health problems and their experiences of the services they received.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative design was chosen to address the research question. Six adult men with intellectual disabilities were recruited from the tertiary hospital and interviewed. The transcripts of these interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Four super-ordinate themes were identified; awareness of mental health problems; yearn for a life outside the ward; interacting with other people and finding purpose.

Originality/value

The participants reported that they struggled with being segregated from their families and communities following an inpatient admission. They were able to report on the emotional difficulties that they experienced and hoped to find employment after their discharge from the hospital. They talked about reconstructing their self-identity and forming friendships to cope with their hospital stay. This research is one of its kind carried out in a non-western society and the findings are discussed in the light of how mental health professionals can best support people with intellectual disabilities during their inpatient treatment.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Biza Stenfert Kroese, Sara Willott, Frances Taylor, Philippa Smith, Ruth Graham, Tara Rutter, Andrew Stott and Paul Willner

Trauma-focussed cognitive-behaviour therapy (TF-CBT) is the most effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who present with complex PTSD…

Abstract

Purpose

Trauma-focussed cognitive-behaviour therapy (TF-CBT) is the most effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who present with complex PTSD are among the most complex and challenging patients seen by intellectual disability psychology and psychiatry services. The purpose of this paper is to study TF-CBT intervention for people with intellectual disabilities and complex PTSD.

Design/methodology/approach

Three groups of adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) presenting with complex PTSD (n=3, n=5 and n=4) were treated using a 12-week manualised intervention adapted from a procedure routinely used in adult mental health services. Participants completed the Impact of Event Scale as adapted for people with intellectual disabilities (IES-ID) before and after the intervention, and interviews conducted to ascertain their experiences of the group were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

The ten participants who completed the intervention showed a 27 per cent decrease in median Impact of Event Scale Intellectual Disabilities scores, equivalent to a medium effect size (d=0.50). Five themes were identified from the interviews: being listened to; it is nice to know you are not the only one; being in a group can be stressful; the importance of feeling safe; achieving and maintaining change. Participants also provided constructive feedback to promote improvements to the manual.

Research limitations/implications

A feasibility study followed by methodologically robust clinical trials is now needed to establish the effectiveness of the intervention and its utility in clinical practice.

Practical implications

This small study has confirmed the potential of TF-CBT as an intervention for extremely vulnerable individuals with ID who present with complex PTSD.

Social implications

The findings indicate that a group intervention is both feasible for and acceptable to adults with ID.

Originality/value

To date, no study has investigated the effectiveness and feasibility of a TF-CBT group intervention for adults with mild ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Agnieszka Pytlowana and Biza Stenfert Kroese

It has been recommended that social, health and other relevant professionals work collaboratively to support parents with learning disabilities (LD) and their children. A…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been recommended that social, health and other relevant professionals work collaboratively to support parents with learning disabilities (LD) and their children. A number of qualitative studies have investigated the experiences of professionals who work with parents with LD. A synthesis of these experiences has not as yet been produced, and therefore, the purpose of this paper is to review how professionals experience working with parents with LD to inform practice guidelines on how parents with LD can be supported most effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search took place using five databases and 15 peer-reviewed papers were identified based on the relevant inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of each included paper was systematically evaluated. Meta-ethnography was used to synthesise the qualitative data from the identified studies.

Findings

The synthesis offered six themes: concerns about knowledge and experience, the importance of and difficulties with available support, the importance of and challenges with liaison with and between professionals, differences in power, conflicting priorities – parents or children?, the personal impact on professionals.

Originality/value

The results are discussed in the context of previous research. Recommendations for future research and practice innovation are made.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Ashley Henderson and Biza Stenfert Kroese

In recent years, group interventions have been designed to simultaneously treat the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance misuse. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, group interventions have been designed to simultaneously treat the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance misuse. This study aims to explore the research literature available regarding these interventions, for women who are involved in the criminal justice system.

Design/methodology/approach

Five electronic databases were searched. The review included primary research papers which reported quantitative outcomes for group interventions for female offenders. The quality of each paper was assessed using the framework developed by Kmet et al. (2004).

Findings

A total of 13 research papers met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. The papers indicated promising results for the treatment of PTSD and substance misuse in this population group.

Practical implications

This area of research is in early development. Studies adopted different research designs and used different outcome measures to assess effectiveness. The quality assessment indicated that future research should adopt standardised assessment measures, blind researchers to reduce bias and implement randomised controlled trials to produce more robust findings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this systematic review is the first to explore the effectiveness of these interventions, specifically for women in the criminal justice system. The authors consider the existing evidence base for this population group and propose measures for future research.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Biza Kroese and Guy Holmes

Heslop, Folkes and Roger's article about the knowledge and experiences of people with learning disabilities and their carers of psychiatric drugs, and Lim's audit of…

Abstract

Heslop, Folkes and Roger's article about the knowledge and experiences of people with learning disabilities and their carers of psychiatric drugs, and Lim's audit of prescription regimes in a hospital for people with severe learning disabilities in Hong Kong, add weight and substance to a substantial body of evidence which suggests that people with learning disabilities are often prescribed inappropriate, and at times excessive, amounts of psychotropic medication and that many staff/carers lack sufficient knowledge and skills to monitor and manage such medications (Singh et al, 1996). A number of years ago we wrote a review of the use of psychotropic drugs for people with learning disabilities (Stenfert Kroese et al, 2001) which included a number of recommendations. The Heslop et al and Lim papers bring up many issues which were relevant to these recommendations.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Laura Robinson, Nazima Escopri, Biza Stenfert Kroese and John Rose

Research into the views of people with dual intellectual and mental health difficulties is sparse. The purpose of this paper is to gain a greater understanding of how…

1052

Abstract

Purpose

Research into the views of people with dual intellectual and mental health difficulties is sparse. The purpose of this paper is to gain a greater understanding of how individuals with mild intellectual disabilities living in the community understand their psychotic symptoms and experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants with intellectual disabilities and psychotic symptoms living in the community were interviewed. The interview schedule explored key areas: understanding and experiences of having an intellectual disability and a psychotic disorder, and of services provided. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

The analysis elicited three main themes: self-concept: “How I understand and see myself”, incorporates what participants understood about their labels, their experiences, and how these labels fitted in with their self-concept; Impact: “How having mental health problems and learning difficulties affect my life”, encompasses communication barriers, lack of control, and stigma and vulnerability. The third main theme was coping: “How I cope with my mental health and learning difficulties”.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that the participants, rather than identifying with specific psychiatric labels perceive themselves as having individual and specific needs. The analysis highlights areas that can be developed to help with coping; ensuring people are respected and heard, empowerment through the development of positive social roles, and psycho-education. These results are a step towards developing understanding of this group of service users.

Originality/value

There has been no previous research into the perspective of this service user group in the community. The study makes recommendations for future person-centred interventions.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Corinna Bruder, Biza Kroese and Sarah Bland

The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how the proceedings of a vulnerable adult protection policy is understood by referrers to affect the psychological…

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how the proceedings of a vulnerable adult protection policy is understood by referrers to affect the psychological and emotional well‐being of adults with a learning disability. During the research process seven referrers of vulnerable adults discussed twelve different cases in in‐depth interviews. The interviews and matching case notes of protection meetings released by social services were analysed by the application of grounded theory techniques. The result is a model that highlights how appraisals of the experience the emotional and behavioural reactions of the vulnerable adults are shaped by the nature of the abuse, the actions taken by protection meetings, the expectations of the vulnerable adults and the availability of support.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Claire Lewis, Biza Stenfert-Kroese and Alex O'Brien

While an increasing number of adults with an intellectual disability are having children, research suggests that they face an increased risk of having their children…

1159

Abstract

Purpose

While an increasing number of adults with an intellectual disability are having children, research suggests that they face an increased risk of having their children removed. The purpose of this paper is to explore child and family social workers’ experiences of working with parents with intellectual disability, in order to further our understanding of this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven social workers were interviewed. Each had experience of working on safeguarding cases where a parent had a diagnosis of intellectual disability. Data were analyzed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

Five super-ordinate themes were identified. These were: “feeling torn,” “experiencing a power imbalance,” “hopelessness,” having “pride” in their work’ and experiencing “barriers.”

Research limitations/implications

The results are discussed in the context of the increased risk that parents with an intellectual disability face of having their children removed. Several areas for future research are identified.

Practical implications

The study highlights several areas for development regarding services for parents with intellectual disability.

Originality/value

The study describes some of the difficulties experienced by social workers in this area of their work, from their own perspective. It also strengthens existing ideas about improving services for parents with intellectual disability.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Biza Stenfert Kroese, John Rose, Kuljit Heer and Alexis O’Brien

The current qualitative study aims to investigate service users’, support staff's and community team members’ views of gender differences in cause and presentation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The current qualitative study aims to investigate service users’, support staff's and community team members’ views of gender differences in cause and presentation of mental health problems, whether current services respond differently to men and women with mental health problems and areas in which services can become more gender sensitive.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups were conducted with service users with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems in addition to two focus groups with a variety of staff. Subsequently, individual interviews were conducted with both male and female staff members employed in residential and community intellectual disability services. The number of participants totalled 54 (16 service users and 38 staff). Thematic analysis was adopted in order to identify dominant themes in the discourse of these stakeholder groups.

Findings

The analysis produced a number of themes which include: compliance versus challenge; vulnerability; expression of emotion; gender equality; same sex support; caring qualities; and boundaries.

Originality/value

A number of suggestions for improving services are discussed in the context of the current findings.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Nicola Rose, John Rose, Biza Stenfert Kroese, Aimee Stimpson, Pamela MacMahon, Andrew Jahoda, Julia Townson, David Felce, Kerenza Hood and Paul Willner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how service managers perceive their service prior to, and following the delivery of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) anger…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how service managers perceive their service prior to, and following the delivery of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) anger management group for individuals with an intellectual disability.

Design/methodology/approach

Telephone interviews were conducted with seven service managers, before and after a CBT group intervention. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis to identify common and/or contrasting themes.

Findings

Before the intervention took place managers observed a lack of consistency in how their staff dealt with challenging incidents and the serious consequences these incidents had for service users as well as staff. They spoke about the importance of multi-disciplinary working and good quality staff selection, support and training. After the group intervention managers commented on a positive “spilling-out effect” whereby the whole organisation was influenced by the intervention, a greater willingness on the part of service users to talk about their problems, and an increased confidence in the staff members who had co-facilitated the group work.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the themes raised are discussed and recommendations for further research are suggested.

Originality/value

This research provides a unique contribution of managers’ views and insight into how hosting a CBT group intervention impacted on their wider services.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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