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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Per Dannemand Andersen, Birgitte Rasmussen, Marianne Strange and Jens Haisler

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

The foresight process had the following key elements: review of international technology foresight projects on nano‐technology; mapping of Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology; broad internet survey among interested parties; expert reports; workshops related to the expert reports; analysis of the dynamics of innovation within nano‐technology; survey on hazards and environmental and ethical aspects; group interviews with members of the public.

Findings

The article reflects on the following methodological issues: domain classification and its influence on conclusions; the use of statements or hypotheses; trustworthiness of the foresight process and its recommendations.

Practical implications

Recommendations from the project have already been used in decision‐making on R&D funding and in strategic deliberation in publicly funded institutions conducting R&D. Others are expected to be used for decision‐making, and some are being discussed in research councils and ministries or are being investigated and developed further. Moreover, the foresight process has created broader awareness of, and debate especially about, the hazardous aspects of nano‐technology among researchers and decision makers.

Originality/value

The article contribute the to the European experiences with national level foresight exercises. The case and the findings are of value for science and innovation policy makers, foresight practitioners and scolars within the field.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Birgitte Rasmussen, Per Dannemand Andersen and Allan Skårup Kristensen

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences and reflect on challenges in transdisciplinary technology foresight as exemplified by cognition and robotics research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences and reflect on challenges in transdisciplinary technology foresight as exemplified by cognition and robotics research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted as a broad transdisciplinary process involving users and producers of robot technology solutions as well as scientists and other experts in cognition and robotics. Transdisciplinarity is understood as the transcendence of disciplinary modes together with the involvement and participation of non‐scientists in problem formulation and knowledge provision. The study focuses on the possibilities for innovation at the crossroads where robotics and cognition meet.

Findings

The paper reflects on the following methodological issues: medium‐ and long‐term research and innovation possibilities and barriers in a transdisciplinary context; the classification and framing of transdisciplinary fields; the facilitation of technology foresight processes; and the trustworthiness of the foresight process and its recommendations.

Practical implications

The results have been disseminated among relevant advisory and grant‐awarding bodies within research and innovation, relevant knowledge institutions and universities, and companies on both the development and user sides of the technologies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to European experiences on national‐level foresight exercises. The conceptual findings of the case study are of value to science and innovation policy makers, foresight practitioners and scholars within the field.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Per Anker Jensen, Per Dannemand Andersen and Birgitte Rasmussen

The purpose of this paper is to identify trends and challenges in relation to the FM profession in the Nordic countries of Europe and to identify inputs to a common Nordic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify trends and challenges in relation to the FM profession in the Nordic countries of Europe and to identify inputs to a common Nordic research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on theory from innovation systems and strategic foresight. First, a review of literature was carried out and an innovation systems model of the FM sector was developed. Second, four national workshops were held involving FM practitioners and researchers from Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. Third, the results of the workshops were presented and discussed at a Nordic FM conference in August 2011. Finally, an adapted Delphi survey was carried out as a final data collection and validation of the findings. This article has the main focus on the results of the Delphi survey.

Findings

The results of the study show that the main issues vary considerably between the four countries, both with regards to megatrends in the strategic environments, the current trends and challenges and the future needs for new competences and knowledge. Despite the large national differences the study is able to identify joint interest across the four countries. Based on the study a common Nordic research agenda is proposed with two headlines: Valuation and professionalization of FM, and Resources and sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides directions for future research with particular focus on the Nordic countries in Europe.

Practical implications

The study identifies trends and challenges as well as need for new knowledge and competences for FM practice in each of the four Nordic countries.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive foresight study aimed at developing a research agenda for FM across the Nordic countries.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Lars P. Andersen, Birgitte Tufle, Jeanette Rasmussen and Kara Chan

The purpose of this paper is to compare sources of money as well as responses to television commercials and pop up advertisements on the internet among young “tween” consumers in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare sources of money as well as responses to television commercials and pop up advertisements on the internet among young “tween” consumers in Denmark and Hong Kong. Findings are compared with existing preconceptions of the tween segment in the marketing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in six primary schools in Denmark and Hong Kong, with 434 respondents from fourth, fifth and sixth grades.

Findings

The paper finds that the Danish tweens received higher monthly incomes from all sources than Hong Kong tweens. Danish tweens were more likely to spend money on CDs, computer games, clothing, sports equipment, and cosmetics/jewelry than Hong Kong tweens. Hong Kong tweens were more likely to spend money on books than Danish tweens. The results showed complex differences in the perception and reactions to advertising. The results seem to support that tween consumption and responses to advertising are motivated differently in cultures of individualism and collectivism, and consequently that the tween consumer segment is not as globally homogeneous as it is claimed to be.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on a convenience sample. The questionnaire consisted of mainly dichotomous scales, limiting the available statistical analysis. Further qualitative study is needed to explore the reasons for the differences.

Practical implications

The paper can serve as a guideline for marketing communication targeting tweens, particularly in case of international or global campaigns.

Originality/value

This paper offers insights into designing communication strategies for tweens, particularly when incorporating advertising on television as well as new media. Policy makers should be aware that perceptions and impact of advertising on children may vary significantly across cultures.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Lars P. Andersen, Birgitte Tufte, Jeanette Rasmussen and Kara Chan

The purpose of this paper is to present a study that compares ownership and usage of new media among young “tween” consumers in Denmark and Hong Kong. Further, it shows the ways…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a study that compares ownership and usage of new media among young “tween” consumers in Denmark and Hong Kong. Further, it shows the ways of finding new interesting web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2004‐2005 a survey was conducted in Denmark and Hong Kong of 434 fourth, fifth and sixth class students. Questionnaires were distributed in six elementary schools. Hypotheses about new media ownership and usage in the two societies are formulated based on the economic development and individualistic/collective cultural dimensions of the societies.

Findings

Household ownership of new media, ownership of mobile phone and heavy use of the internet were found to be more prevalent among Danish tweens than among Hong Kong tweens. Danish tweens were more likely to use mobile phones and the internet for interpersonal communication and for enjoyment than Hong Kong tweens. Hong Kong tweens used the internet more for educational purposes than Danish tweens. The results seem to support that adoption and consumption of new media are motivated differently in cultures of individualism and collectivism, and consequently that the tween consumer segment is not as globally homogeneous as it is claimed to be.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on a convenience sample, thus it may be problematic to generalize from the findings.

Practical implications

The study can serve as a guideline for marketing communication targeting tweens. The emphasis on the hedonic use and social function of new media may be suitable for a highly developed, individualistic society. In collective societies, marketers may need to put emphasis on the instrumental values of new media, such as improving academic performance.

Originality/value

This paper offers insights into designing communication strategies for Danish and Hong Kong tweens, particularly when incorporating new media. Findings are compared with existing preconceptions of the tween segment in the marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2010

Morten Hesse

Assessment of personality disorders in substance abusing patients may produce important insights. Little is known about the value of routine personality disorder assessment in a…

Abstract

Assessment of personality disorders in substance abusing patients may produce important insights. Little is known about the value of routine personality disorder assessment in a clinical context. Adults with past‐year substance dependence seeking treatment at a centralised intake unit for substance abusers in the City of Copenhagen were randomised to assessment of personality disorders and individual psychoeducation vs. attention placebo (n=75). All patients received psychoeducation for attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and anxiety/depression when indicated. Patients were followed at three and six months post‐treatment. The psychoeducation for personality disorder did not result in improved functioning. Significant differences indicated a larger drop in substance use in the experimental group. Assessing personality disorders and providing psychoeducation is a promising treatment in a clinical context. There is a need for relevant treatment options to improve functioning and quality of life for this group of patients.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Kara Chan, Birgitte Tufte, Gianna Cappello and Russell B. Williams

The present study aims to examine girls' perception of gender roles and gender identities in Hong Kong.

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to examine girls' perception of gender roles and gender identities in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 girls aged 10 to 12 were asked to take pictures from the media that could illustrate “what girls or women should or should not be; and what girls or women should or should not do”. Qualitative interviews were conducted.

Findings

Analysis of interviews and images captured found that tween girls' perceived gender roles for females were based on a mixture of traditional and contemporary role models. Girls in Hong Kong demonstrated conservatism in sexuality. Sexy outlook and pre‐marital sexual relations were considered inappropriate. Tween girls showed concern about global as well as domestic social agendas. They used a variety of media and showed interest in contents primarily for adults.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on a convenience sample. The interviewees came from middle to lower income families, limiting the validity for generalization. Further quantitative study is needed to establish benchmarks.

Practical implications

This study will help in understanding the kinds of media images that attract the attention of female tweens and what those images mean to them. The study can serve as a guideline for marketing communication aimed at this target group, particularly for skincare, beauty, and cosmetic marketers.

Originality/value

The first novel idea that is being used in this research is the combination of visual method and the application of qualitative methodology to the study of media effects. The second novel idea is the use of interviewees as data‐collectors. The methodology enables contextually relevant questions and to understand the meaning of the images captured.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Jakob Krause-Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to analyse through ethnographic fieldwork the social and cultural context and (unintended) consequences of introducing a management concept from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse through ethnographic fieldwork the social and cultural context and (unintended) consequences of introducing a management concept from the private sector (LEAN) into the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnographic fieldwork combined with reading of reports and material.

Findings

The major findings are: first, Lean is seen in a cultural context, it is argued that the persuasiveness of Lean depends on building a metaphorical connection between organizational aims and individual experiences and bodily ideals; second, Lean purports to be a win-win game and road to eliminating “waste” through worker participation, empowerment and enthusiasm. The research points to the contrary. Lean was met with scepticism and was seen by the social workers as a waste of time.

Originality/value

As demonstrated in the paper, the vast majority of research published about Lean is hortatory in nature. It is recipe books trying to convince readers of the benefits of introducing Lean. This paper, on the contrary, attempts an open ethnographic exploration of the Lean process and its social and cultural ramifications.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Anne Benedicte Juul, Christian Gluud, Jørn Wetterslev, Torben Callesen, Gorm Jensen and Allan Kofoed‐Enevoldsen

To examine the availability and quality of clinical guidelines on perioperative diabetes care in hospital units before and after a randomised clinical trial (RCT) and…

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Abstract

Purpose

To examine the availability and quality of clinical guidelines on perioperative diabetes care in hospital units before and after a randomised clinical trial (RCT) and international accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

Interventional “before‐after” study in 51 units (38 surgical and 13 anaesthetic) in nine hospitals participating in a RCT in the greater Copenhagen area; 27 of the units also underwent international accreditation.

Findings

The proportion of units with guidelines increased from 24/51 (47 percent) units before to 38/51 (75 percent) units after the trial. Among the 27 units without guidelines before the trial, significantly more accredited units compared to non‐accredited units had a guideline after the trial (9/10 (90 percent) compared to 5/17 (29 percent). The quality of the systematic development scale and the clinical scales improved significantly after the trial in both accredited units (both p<0.001) and in non‐accredited units (both p<0.02). The improvement of the systematic development scale was significantly higher in accredited than in non‐accredited units (p<0.01).

Originality/value

The combination of conducting both the DIPOM Trial and international accreditation led to a significant improvement of both dissemination and quality of guidelines on perioperative diabetic care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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