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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into mechanism by which environmentally friendly initiatives positively affect a service firm's revenue stream. First, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into mechanism by which environmentally friendly initiatives positively affect a service firm's revenue stream. First, it explores attributes consumers associate with green services. Second, it affirms the mediating role of warm emotions in connecting green services to satisfaction and customer loyalty. Third, it investigates a set of amplifiers of warm emotions. These are the green tendencies of the consumer and perceived motives for adopting environmentally friendly practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved two studies. A critical incident study was used to tap into the consumer's perspective on green services. A total of 262 attributes of green services were categorized into overarching themes. A quantitative study addressed the mediating relationships and amplifiers of warm emotions. Pooled across three services, a total of 846 observations were analyzed.

Findings

The findings reveal that a consumer views a service as environmentally friendly if it exhibits green attributes in either the core service, service delivery process, service environment or peripheral service activities. The results of Study II affirm that warm emotions mediate the relationship between perceptions of the environmental friendliness of a service and customer satisfaction as well as customer loyalty. The study findings suggest that positive emotions are further strengthened by the level of greenness of the consumer and by a firm's money saving motives as well as environmental preservation motives the consumer attributes to the adoption of green practices.

Originality/value

This study advances the authors' understanding of what attributes consumers associate with service greenness. This research expands on the service greenness and positive emotions connection by including an initial set of amplifiers of positive emotions to include the greenness of the consumer and motives for adopting green practices.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The purpose of this study is to contrast the effects of four exit barriers on word of mouth activities. Monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers are…

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1816

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contrast the effects of four exit barriers on word of mouth activities. Monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers are compared. The differential effects of these four barriers on the valence of word of mouth (positive, negative), the type of word of mouth recipient (weak tie, strong tie) and the motives (catharsis, company sabotage) for spreading word of mouth are studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for empirically addressing a set of hypotheses were collected from 185 consumers. The hypotheses were analyzed using ANOVA models along with post hoc tests.

Findings

The results suggest that the type of exit barrier matters. Exit barriers, with respect to word of mouth activities, seem to fall on a continuum. On one extreme, the most detrimental barriers are monetary hurdles, and on the other end, the least detrimental barriers are convenience hurdles. Monetary barriers are responsible for the most negative word of mouth and company sabotage. Social and convenience barriers lead to significantly less.

Practical implications

The implications for erecting exit barriers are discussed. In particular, the value of monetary barriers is questioned. The benefits of such involuntary customer retention methods may be offset by the sabotage they invite through negative word of mouth.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into word of mouth activities of dissatisfied customers that are trapped by various exit barriers. The word of mouth activities investigated include valence, recipient type and motives. The study contrasts monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Aliosha Alexandrov and Birgit Leisen Pollack

Despite the common understanding of what interestingness is, few people can explain what makes something interesting. The purpose of this paper is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the common understanding of what interestingness is, few people can explain what makes something interesting. The purpose of this paper is to explore the theoretical foundation of interestingness and test if it has merit in the branding context. It aims to help practitioners understand how to make a brand interesting and what outcomes to expect from it.

Design/methodology/approach

Three preliminary studies (Studies 1, 2 and 3) provide proof of concept. Study 4 tests the antecedences and outcomes of brand interestingness (BI) across 66 brands by accounting for individual and brand variations. Study 5 examines the moderating effects of brand use and brand familiarity on BI and its outcomes.

Findings

A broad literature review reveals that interestingness is an emotion and is, therefore, an affective state. The findings from two exploratory studies show that customers naturally associate interestingness with specific brands and interesting brands are associated with novelty. Study 3 demonstrates that from all affective states arising from the evaluation of a brand (i.e. easiness, pleasantness, interestingness, challenge and difficulty), BI has the highest effect on purchase intention (PI). Study 4 demonstrates that the antecedents of BI are the novelty associated with the symbolic and functional aspects of a brand, and also the ability to cope with those novelty components. Two positive outcomes of BI are PI and word of mouth (WOM). Study 5 demonstrates that brand familiarity and brand use moderate the effect of BI on purchase intent and WOM. The research concludes with an operational definition of the BI concept and future research suggestions.

Originality/value

The research introduces the interesting concept in the brand context. Based on a broad literature review and several studies, it identifies the antecedents and outcomes of BI. It helps practitioners understand how they can increase the interestingness of brands and what outcomes to expect.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The purpose of this paper is to reassess the properties of the hierarchical service quality model (HSQM) – a previously introduced service quality assessment tool. The…

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11297

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reassess the properties of the hierarchical service quality model (HSQM) – a previously introduced service quality assessment tool. The HSQM views service quality as a three‐tiered concept with interaction quality, outcome quality, and physical environment quality as initial sub‐dimensions. The study aims to apply HSQM to two new service contexts and to further investigate the relationship between service quality, as measured by this instrument, and satisfaction and customer loyalty. To this end, five hypotheses are to be submitted to empirical tests.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for empirically re‐assessing the scale's properties and for testing the proposed hypotheses were collected from convenience samples of 250 customers of hairdresser/barber services and 300 customers of local phone service subscribers. The measurement model of the HSQM was re‐assessed using confirmatory factor analysis. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results confirm the HSQM as predictor of satisfaction and loyalty. However, the results suggest that the significance of various service quality dimensions differs depending on the type of service.

Practical implications

From a managerial perspective, the HSQM is useful for assessing service quality at various levels. It allows firms to recognize problems in their delivered interaction quality, outcome quality, or the physical service environment.

Originality/value

The paper provides further evidence for the validity and reliability of the HSQM service quality measure.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The aim of this paper is to challenge the assumption that the relationship between service quality attributes and customer satisfaction follows a classic linear path. It…

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6717

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to challenge the assumption that the relationship between service quality attributes and customer satisfaction follows a classic linear path. It suggests the existence of a threshold level after which the strength of the relationship between the two constructs, for some service attributes, adjusts. Depending on the type of adjustment, service attributes can be classified as satisfier or dissatisfier. Each requires a distinct managerial action.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected via self‐administered questionnaire from customers of three service industries (i.e. banking service, hairdresser service, phone service). The type of impact of nine individual service quality attributes on customer satisfaction was investigated using multiple regression models with interaction terms.

Findings

The empirical findings provide evidence for the existence of satisfiers and dissatisfiers. Satisfiers exhibit initially no relationship with satisfaction, but after the acceptable level of quality (i.e. inflection point) has been reached, become positively related. Dissatisfiers follow initially a positive relationship path with satisfaction but after the inflection point exhibit no relationship, or at best a significantly weakened one, with satisfaction. The relationship patterns were found to be service attribute as well as service type dependent.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that, for dissatisfiers, increasing service quality ad infinitum may not be the most prudent approach. Here, gains in satisfaction can no longer be achieved after the acceptable quality level has been reached. However, for satisfiers, service firms must leap over the threshold before gains in satisfaction can be realized. This may require large investments in quality improvements.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Birgit Leisen Pollack and Aliosha Alexandrov

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, it aims to provide a review of the Net Promoter© Index (NPI), the evidence of its ability to predict financial performance…

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1565

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, it aims to provide a review of the Net Promoter© Index (NPI), the evidence of its ability to predict financial performance, and the evidence of its superiority to other voice of customer metrics. Second, it seeks to investigate the nomological validity of the Net Promoter question. It aims to view the NP question as an alternative to the traditional word-of-mouth measure, which is one of the components of customer loyalty. The nomological validity of NP was evaluated in a model including customer satisfaction as an antecedent and repurchase intention as a consequence.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for empirically addressing a set of hypotheses related to the nomological validity were collected via self-administered questionnaire. A total of 159 participants completed questions for banking services, 153 individuals completed questions for hairdresser/barber services, and 132 completed questions for cell phone services. The hypotheses were tested using partial least square analysis.

Findings

The results provide evidence for the nomological validity of the NPI question; albeit, the traditional word-of-mouth measure seems to perform equally as well or even better.

Practical implications

A set of pros and cons related to NPI are developed. The paper recommends including the NPI in a portfolio of voice of customer metrics but not as a standalone diagnostic tool. Further, given the present state of evidence, it cannot be recommended to use the NPI as a predictor of growth nor financial performance.

Originality/value

The paper provides further insights into the validity of the Net Promoter Index as a measure of customer loyalty.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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