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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Danielle M. Fenimore and Wesley G. Jennings

The purpose of this paper is to use data from the Longitudinal Study of Violent Criminal Behavior in the USA to examine case configurations of violent behavior using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use data from the Longitudinal Study of Violent Criminal Behavior in the USA to examine case configurations of violent behavior using a biopsychosocial framework. Specifically, the theory posits that arguably all behavior is the result of specific combinations of biopsychological (individual) and sociocultural (environmental) characteristics that are interacting within the individual. With regard to criminal and violent behavior, the theoretical assumption is that this maladaptive behavior is the result of a negative interaction between the biopsychological and sociocultural factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design consists of secondary data analysis. A conjunctive analysis of case configurations was performed using data from the Longitudinal Survey of Violent Criminal Behavior to formally explore the tenets of Cortés and Gatti’s (1972) biopsychosocial theory.

Findings

The results suggest that there are main effects for ego strength, family problems, family incohesiveness and underachievement as they relate to offending. A possible six-way interaction was also identified within the case configurations that provides empirical support for Cortés and Gatti’s (1972) biopsychosocial theory of deviance.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the existing biopsychosocial literature by providing insight on the contextual variability in pathways to violent offending. Specifically, the evidence provided indicates that Cortés and Gatti’s (1972) biopsychosocial theory of deviance can be extended to comparing violent and non-violent offenders. Implications for policy and practice are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Kaz Stuart, Mark A. Faghy, Elaine Bidmead, Ruth Browning, Catriona Roberts, Sam Grimwood and Thea Winn-Reed

This paper proposes a biopsychosocial (BPS) analysis of COVID-19 experiences which enhances understanding of complex and interrelated factors and leads to the proposition…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a biopsychosocial (BPS) analysis of COVID-19 experiences which enhances understanding of complex and interrelated factors and leads to the proposition of a BPS recovery framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Online narrative research was used to explore people's experiences of COVID-19 and was conducted over a four-month period. The call was distributed via a short open-ended qualitative online survey advertised on social media platforms and 305 responses came from across England.

Findings

The findings illustrate people with a narrow range of BPS characteristics experienced over a wide range of BPS impacts which are nuanced, complex and dynamic. Left unaddressed these may create future adverse BPS characteristics. An integrated BPS framework for recovery is proposed to avoid such further negative outcomes from the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

The sample contained a bias in age, gender and living arrangements.

Practical implications

The paper offers a clear framework to enable integrated holistic recovery/regrowth planning.

Social implications

Using the framework would reduce social and health inequities which have been recently deepened by COVID-19 in the long-term.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its use of a BPS analytical framework.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Marina Astakhova and Mary Hogue

– The purpose of this paper is to apply a biopsychosocial model to develop an integrated typology of heavy work investment (HWI) behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a biopsychosocial model to develop an integrated typology of heavy work investment (HWI) behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows an inductive approach to theory building in which we review relevant constructs, categorize those constructs, and outline the relationships among them.

Findings

The paper provides a theoretically grounded typology of HWI that distinguishes three general types of HWI (workaholic HWI, situational HWI, and pseudo HWI) and nine corresponding HWI manifestations. It is suggested that various forms of HWI differ in nature according to the joint interplay of varying strengths of biological, psychological, and social influences. The paper also demonstrates how the typology can be applied to predict unique individual and organizational outcomes associated with each HWI sub-type.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a unified strong foundation for developing HWI measures. It offers a direction for future research that will examine antecedents and outcomes of the nine sub-types. It provokes the examination of the “stability” of each HWI manifestation over time by including a temporal component into the biopsychosocial framework.

Practical implications

This research will help practitioners differentiate among HWI manifestations to effectively sustain positive outcomes and proactively evade negative outcomes associated with HWI.

Originality/value

To date, various manifestations of HWI and workaholism have been discussed in the literature with little unification across studies. In this paper, the authors respond to the call for a theoretically grounded approach that will provide unifying explanations to why and how HWI manifests.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Martin Frutiger, Tamasin Taylor and Robert James Borotkanics

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported non-specific neck pain (NSNP) with presenteeism and biopsychosocial factors in office workers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported non-specific neck pain (NSNP) with presenteeism and biopsychosocial factors in office workers.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted on office workers (n=119) from four workplaces in Sydney, Australia. Data were collected using online questionnaires comprising the Neck Pain and Disability Scale, Neck Bournemouth Index and Stanford Presenteeism Scale 6. Psychosocial factors were explored given their etiological and maintenance roles in musculoskeletal disorders. A combination of linear, generalised linear and ordinal regression models were applied.

Findings

The study found that presenteeism was significantly associated with NSNP. Psychosocial factors such as concentration, emotional stress, anxiety, depression and outlook were found to be associated with increased NSNP.

Research limitations/implications

This research has implications as it expands understanding of the interplay between presenteeism and NSNP and psychosocial factors in the workplace.

Originality/value

The study identified the importance of organisations being able to identify when an office worker may be working while experiencing NSNP and how they may best support their employee’s recovery to prevent long-term disability and work productivity issues. These findings inform workplace policy formation by public health agencies.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Fernando Hormazabal, Leonardo Lavanderos and Alejandro Malpartida

The biopsychosocial model (BPSM) on chronic pain is an interactive psychophysiological behavior pattern that cannot be separated into different independent components…

Abstract

Purpose

The biopsychosocial model (BPSM) on chronic pain is an interactive psychophysiological behavior pattern that cannot be separated into different independent components. However, the epistemological analysis of the classic BPSM, based on “biopsychosocial factors,” can be reduced to a list of biological, psychological and social factors, which can be addressed simultaneously, but independently, where simultaneity is seen as relationality. The purpose of this paper is to achieve a systemic and transdisciplinary vision of the idea of simultaneity and multidisciplinarity of the BPSM and propose a new model for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the following conceptual triad, co-autonomy, centralization and non-requisite variety, to constitute systemic indicators, the authors design a new conceptual model of cohesion, communication, conduction and coordination (CO4) model to deal with the relational system of chronic pain patients.

Findings

The indicators of the CO4 system as transdisciplinary structure create and focus a completely new relationship regarding the relational system of the chronic pain patients. This new conceptual framework transcends the objects and frameworks of each discipline separately, going beyond the multidisciplinary model.

Originality/value

The CO4 model allows a diagnostic and therapeutic standardization as a new model on chronic pain, improving therapeutic efficiency, resource use and laying the foundation for a common language in future chronic pain research.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Geoffrey C. Williams, Kathryn M. Markakis, Deborah Ossip‐Klein, Scott McIntosh, Scott Tripler and Tana Grady‐Weliky

To provide a rationale regarding the importance of physician behavior change counseling. To describe the double helix behavior change curriculum at the University of…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a rationale regarding the importance of physician behavior change counseling. To describe the double helix behavior change curriculum at the University of Rochester (UR). To provide initial evidence that the curriculum is effective.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence that physician use of the 5A's model is effective in changing important patient health behaviors is summarized. The behavior change curriculum is described. Initial evidence assessing knowledge, attitudes and skills for behavior change counseling is reviewed.

Findings

Physicians will be better prepared to intervene to improve their patients quality and quantity of life if they consistently counsel patients using a brief standard model (the 5A's) that integrates biological, psychological, and social aspects of disease and treatment. Past efforts in the UR's curriculum have demonstrated that students adopt broader “biopsychosocial values” when the curriculum supports their learning needs. Initial evidence demonstrates that double helix curriculum students learn this model well and are able to provide the counseling in a patient‐centered style.

Research limitations/implications

These results are limited by the observational design, and the reliance on student self‐reports and standardized patient observations of student behavior rather than change in patient behavior.

Practical implications

Strong evidence exists that physicians can be effective in providing behavior change counseling. Additional research is called for to create, implement, and fully evaluate behavior change counseling curricula for medical students.

Originality/value

An example of a behavior change curriculum is provided for medical educators, and initial evidence of its effectiveness is provided.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Alina Zajadacz

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a critical analysis of the disability models developed to date and of how they function in practice. Furthermore, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a critical analysis of the disability models developed to date and of how they function in practice. Furthermore, it aims to answer the following question: which model of disability (MD) will provide the most suitable foundation for any course of action undertaken in the process of planning accessible tourism development in the future?

Design/methodology/approach

In the first stage of the study a critical analysis of the MDs described in the literature as well as in selected reports and expert opinions relating to people with disability (PwD) was performer. These findings then became the basis for the second stage of the study which focuses on identifying attitudes within society towards the types of tourism on offer connected to the analysed MDs. The applied research methods include an analysis of a survey (2013, 2014) carried out face-to-face and on the SurveyMonkey web site. The study group consisted of 619 people (from Poland, Russia, Germany, Portugal, Slovakia, Canada, Tunisia and Great Britain).

Findings

The great diversity of disabilities makes finding a universal solution in the creation of accessible tourism supply a complex task. This supports the need for a flexible “mix of various models” aimed at finding optimal solutions and the personalisation of tourism. In this context the greatest potential in the development of accessible tourism are models which are a synthesis of many determiners of disability such as the biopsychosocial or the geographical model of disability. The dynamics of accessible tourism development is likely to be increasingly influenced by the economic model, reflecting current trends for the personalisation of tourism supply.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was carried out mainly within the European Community, the exception being respondents from Irkutsk in eastern (Asian) Russia. In order to gain a global view of the development of accessible tourism, research should be performed in countries representing all continents or tourist regions. Additionally, reflecting the definition of accessible tourism its beneficiaries – PwD – should participate in decision-making processes. Tourism service providers who are directly engaged in tourism supply also have a role to play. Their opinions and attitudes towards the development of accessible tourism determine its very nature in reality.

Practical implications

The survey on attitudes in society regarding the organisation of tourist trips for PwD confirmed conclusions from the analysis of the practical implications of various disability models in the creation of tourism supply that a single universal, optimal solution does not exist. All of the described MD can be applied in the development of a diverse tourism supply. The proposed model “diversification of supply […]” is the theoretical basis for the conscious development of accessible tourism in practice which in accordance with changes observed in the tourism market is undergoing increasing diversification and personalisation.

Social implications

In each of the tourism supply for PwD types the economic model of disability based on the identification of PwD needs and surrounding society is important. The number of PwD and the scope of necessary services, social support (PwD often travel accompanied by one to three people) is determined by income in all the sectors identified in the structure of tourism supply. From the economic point of view, awareness of different types of disability and the diverse models describing it are significant aids in the segmentation of tourism supply and placement of products accessible to PwD on the tourism market.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new, critical perspective on the selected MD, the key to which is the search for optimal solutions in the development of accessible tourism. The analysis performed indicated the need for a synthesis of paradigms at the core of the conceptualisation of particular models, including those often regarded as being contrary (medical and social). The results of studies would give tourism providers important data on an increasingly competitive tourism market, and also affect changes in how PwD, the elderly, are viewed, from the category of “relatively poor” to “attractive, using a wide range of services”.

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Ethan W. Gossett and P. D. Harms

Acute and chronic pain affects more Americans than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. Conservative estimates suggest the total economic cost of pain in the…

Abstract

Acute and chronic pain affects more Americans than heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. Conservative estimates suggest the total economic cost of pain in the United States is $600 billion, and more than half of this cost is due to lost productivity, such as absenteeism, presenteeism, and turnover. In addition, an escalating opioid epidemic in the United States and abroad spurred by a lack of safe and effective pain management has magnified challenges to address pain in the workforce, particularly the military. Thus, it is imperative to investigate the organizational antecedents and consequences of pain and prescription opioid misuse (POM). This chapter provides a brief introduction to pain processing and the biopsychosocial model of pain, emphasizing the relationship between stress, emotional well-being, and pain in the military workforce. We review personal and organizational risk and protective factors for pain, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, optimism, perceived organizational support, and job strain. Further, we discuss the potential adverse impact of pain on organizational outcomes, the rise of POM in military personnel, and risk factors for POM in civilian and military populations. Lastly, we propose potential organizational interventions to mitigate pain and provide the future directions for work, stress, and pain research.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2014

Sandra Burkhardt

Since 1985, Advances in Special Education has aspired to advance theories and best practices essential to understanding, treating, and instructing students with…

Abstract

Since 1985, Advances in Special Education has aspired to advance theories and best practices essential to understanding, treating, and instructing students with disabilities. At times, advancement involves vision and innovation. At other times, new technologies, cutting edge medical procedures, or innovate pedagogical practices capture the attention of special education professionals globally and substantial changes can result in the way students with special needs are instructed. This volume in Special Education International Perspectives invites a call for common ground and global commonalities in all schools. The main theme of this chapter is that teachers matter. The chapter reviews two decade of scientific evidence that supports this theme. The scientific evidence comes from neuroscience and social cognition findings related to the importance of the teacher–student interaction. Environmental influences are not only the physical world but the all-important social world. The chapter begins with an overview of the “social” brain relative to teaching. A practical guide for teacher use of evidence-based educational practices concludes the chapter.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

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