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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Ryo Kohsaka, Yoshinori Fujihira and Yuta Uchiyama

Biomimetics are expected to contribute to sustainable environmental management; however, there has been no exploration of industry perceptions by using empirical data…

Abstract

Purpose

Biomimetics are expected to contribute to sustainable environmental management; however, there has been no exploration of industry perceptions by using empirical data. This study aims to identify the trends and perceptions of biomimetics. The industrial sectors in Japan and international patent application trends are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey to identify the perceptions of staff members in Japanese private companies (n = 276) was conducted. Japan is an emerging country in terms of the social implementation of biomimetics, and this paper can provide insights into other such countries.

Findings

It is identified that the strength of connections to biomimetics differs across industrial sectors. The respondents from companies that use nanoscale biomimetics tend to have the knowledge of, and experience in, biomimetics. Regarding the overall understanding of patent applications, Japanese private company employees require knowledge of patent application trends and country rankings as potential factors influencing the development of biomimetics.

Social implications

Knowledge transfer and sharing of experience among engineers and researchers of nanoscale technologies and urban scales are necessary to facilitate biomimetic advancement.

Originality/value

The results of the first survey and an analysis of the perceptions of staff members in private companies in Japan are provided to show the challenges in the social implementation of biomimetics. The results can be referred to for the social implementation of biomimetics in emerging countries. The method of this study can be applied to an international comparative analysis in future research.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Torben Lenau, Hyunmin Cheong and Li Shu

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. The paper reviews a number of biomimetic studies of sense organs in animals and illustrates how a formal search method developed at University of Toronto can be applied to sensor design.

Design/methodology/approach

Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the biological solutions, identification of design principles and design of the desired artefact. The present search method is based on formulation of relevant keywords and search for occurrences in a standard university biology textbook. Most often a simple formulation of keywords and a following search is not enough to generate a sufficient amount of useful ideas or the search gives too many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms.

Findings

A major problem in biomimetic design is finding the relevant analogies to actual design tasks in nature.

Research limitations/implications

Biomimetics can be a challenge to engineers due to the terminology from another scientific discipline.

Practical implications

Using a formalised search method is a way of solving the problem of finding the relevant biological analogies.

Originality/value

The paper is of value as most present biomimetic research is focused on the understanding of biological phenomena and does not have as much focus on the engineering design challenges.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Siva Marimuthu and Dhavamani Chinnathambi

Since the inception of aerospace engineering, reducing drag is of eternal importance. Over the years, researchers have been trying to improve the aerodynamics of National…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the inception of aerospace engineering, reducing drag is of eternal importance. Over the years, researchers have been trying to improve the aerodynamics of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) aerofoils in many ways. It is proved that smooth-surfaced NACA 0012 aerofoil produces more drag in compressible flow. Recent research on shark-skin pattern warrants a feasible solution to many fluid-engineering problems. Several attempts were made by many researchers to implement the idea of shark skin in the form of coatings, texture and more. However, those ideas are at greater risk when it comes to wing maintenance. The purpose of this paper is to implement a relatively larger biomimetic pattern which would make way for easy maintenance of patterned wings with improved performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, two biomimetic aerofoils are designed by optimizing the surface pattern of shark skin and are tested at different angles of attack in the computational flow domain.

Findings

The results of the biomimetic aerofoils prove that viscous and total drag can be reduced up to 33.08% and 3.68%, respectively, at high subsonic speed when validated against a NACA 0012 aerofoil. With the ample effectiveness of patched shark-skin pattern, biomimetic aerofoil generates as high as 10.42% lift than NACA 0012.

Originality/value

In this study, a feasible shark-skin pattern is constructed for NACA 0012 in a transonic flow regime. Computational results achieved using the theoretical model agree with experimental data.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to provide an insight into recent biomimetic sensor developments.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an insight into recent biomimetic sensor developments.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief introduction, this paper considers a number of specific sensor R&D activities which involve the use of differing biomimetic concepts, including the fabrication of artificial sensing organs, emulating human senses, novel uses of biological structures and systems exploiting biologically‐inspired behaviour.

Findings

This paper shows that a range of different biomimetic design concepts are being applied to sensors that respond to a range of physical, gaseous and chemical variables. Robust, multi‐sensor systems are being developed which emulate biologically‐inspired behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper provides an up to date technical review of a range of differing biomimetic sensor designs and concepts.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to describe recent research into biomimetic imaging and vision systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe recent research into biomimetic imaging and vision systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction, this paper discusses a range of biomimetic imaging and vision system research activities and their potential applications. Brief conclusions are drawn.

Findings

This shows that biomimetic design concepts, many based on insect vision, are being applied widely to prototype imaging systems. These exhibit features such as wide fields of view, hyperacuity and infra‐red detection and offer prospects to enhance the capabilities of such systems in a wide range of applications.

Originality/value

This paper provides details of recent biomimetic imaging research, which has potential in a range of robotic and other applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

J.K. Stroble, R.B. Stone and S.E. Watkins

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the wide range of biomimetic sensor technology and innovations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the wide range of biomimetic sensor technology and innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

The reader is introduced to biomimetic sensors, their types, their advantages and how they are different from traditional sensors. Background information is also provided regarding sensor design, inspiration and innovation.

Findings

There are two approaches to sensor design, which lead to diverse advantages and innovations. Classification of biomimetic sensors indicated which natural senses are underutilized by sensor designers and researchers.

Originality/value

The paper provides information of value for those seeking innovative sensor designs and research information for those who want to research in this area.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Yang Lu, Shujuan Yi, Yurong Liu and Yuling Ji

This paper aims to design a multi-layer convolutional neural network (CNN) to solve biomimetic robot path planning problem.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to design a multi-layer convolutional neural network (CNN) to solve biomimetic robot path planning problem.

Design/methodology/approach

At first, the convolution kernel with different scales can be obtained by using the sparse auto encoder training algorithm; the parameter of the hidden layer is a series of convolutional kernel, and the authors use these kernels to extract first-layer features. Then, the authors get the second-layer features through the max-pooling operators, which improve the invariance of the features. Finally, the authors use fully connected layers of neural networks to accomplish the path planning task.

Findings

The NAO biomimetic robot respond quickly and correctly to the dynamic environment. The simulation experiments show that the deep neural network outperforms in dynamic and static environment than the conventional method.

Originality/value

A new method of deep learning based biomimetic robot path planning is proposed. The authors designed a multi-layer CNN which includes max-pooling layer and convolutional kernel. Then, the first and second layers features can be extracted by these kernels. Finally, the authors use the sparse auto encoder training algorithm to train the CNN so as to accomplish the path planning task of NAO robot.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of recent progress into the development of biomimetic adhesives, particularly those that mimic the attachment mechanism of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of recent progress into the development of biomimetic adhesives, particularly those that mimic the attachment mechanism of the gecko lizard's foot.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first discusses the discovery of the gecko's adhesion mechanism. It then describes key “gecko glue” developments and summarises the properties of experimental adhesives that exploit this effect. It concludes with a consideration of anticipated applications.

Findings

This paper shows that, following the discovery of the gecko's adhesion mechanism in 2002, which is based on van der Waals forces, biomimetic adhesives have become the topic of a major research effort. These developments are poised to yield families of novel adhesive materials with superior properties which are likely to find uses in industries ranging from defence and nanotechnology to healthcare and sport.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique insight into the latest developments in biomimetic adhesive technology.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Yajing Zhang, Guian Shi, Yue Liu, Qin Wu, Wenhao Yang and Linliang Zhao

The purpose of this study is to develop new biodegradable magnesium alloy. Magnesium possesses similar mechanical properties to natural bone; it is a potential candidate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop new biodegradable magnesium alloy. Magnesium possesses similar mechanical properties to natural bone; it is a potential candidate for resorbable implant applications. However, in physiological conditions, the degradation rate of Mg is too high to be used as an implant material.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, Zn, Sr and Ca were chosen as alloying elements; a coating was deposited on the MgZnSrCa alloy surface by means of a biomimetic technique. The corrosion rates of the uncoated and coated specimens were tested in simulated body fluid.

Findings

The hydroxyapatite coating formed on the MgZnSrCa alloy surface and the hydroxyapatite layer markedly decreased the corrosion rate of the MgZnSrCa alloy.

Originality/value

A homogenous hydroxyapatite coating was formed on the MgZnSrCa alloy surface by using a biomimetic coating technique. The biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating markedly reduced the corrosion rate of the MgZnSrCa alloy, and the largest decrease in wastage rate was 44 per cent.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Victor V. Klemas

The purpose of this paper is to acquaint a wide audience of readers with some of the unique remote sensing and navigation capabilities of animals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to acquaint a wide audience of readers with some of the unique remote sensing and navigation capabilities of animals.

Design/methodology/approach

Biomimetic comparison of remote sensors evolved by animals and sensors designed by man. The study and comparison includes thermal infrared sensors used by snakes, echolocation used by bats and dolphins, and navigation methods used by birds. Countermeasures used by prey to avoid capture are also considered.

Findings

Some animals have remote sensing and navigation capabilities that are considerably more efficient than those provided by the human body or designed by man.

Practical implications

Sensor designers may be encouraged to use the biometic approach in the design of new sensors.

Social implications

The paper provides a better understanding of animal behaviour, especially their unique abilities to remotely sense, echolocate and navigate with high accuracy over considerable distances.

Originality/value

The paper presents a comparison of remote sensors used by animals with those developed by humans. Remote sensor designers can learn to improve their sensor designs by studying animal sensors within a biomimetic framework.

1 – 10 of 651