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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2010

K.R. Grosskopf

The purpose of this paper is to identify safety hazards likely to be encountered during post‐disaster recovery and reconstruction, identify barriers to effective safety…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify safety hazards likely to be encountered during post‐disaster recovery and reconstruction, identify barriers to effective safety training and hazard mitigation, and provide actionable guidance on methods to safely avoid and abate such hazards.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were administered to 400 participants at 13 training sites to evaluate safety practices among reconstruction contractors and workers.

Findings

A comparison of survey results to hazards likely to cause injuries and fatalities during post‐disaster reconstruction indicates that little effort is made to assess workers' physical condition or immunization records prior to deployment. Furthermore, data suggest that workers lack safety training in reconstruction‐specific hazards such as electrocution, falls, chemical and biological hazards (e.g. contaminated flood water), and equipment hazards (aerial lifts, ladders, electric equipment, generators, etc.). Findings also indicate that training effectiveness is further compromised by limited language and literacy skills of workers, high turnover of workers, and insufficient resources for adequate safety training frequency and duration, especially among smaller contractors (<100 workers).

Originality/value

The paper is based on original research funded by the US Government following Hurricane Katrina and is intended to aid in the development of targeted training to reduce worker injuries and fatalities during post‐disaster reconstruction.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Vasiliki Brinia and Eleni Antonaki

This paper was written in order to present research undertaken in several hospital units in Greece, in order to explore: nurses' knowledge on health risk factors

Abstract

Purpose

This paper was written in order to present research undertaken in several hospital units in Greece, in order to explore: nurses' knowledge on health risk factors associated with their work responsibilities, the ways that these factors interfere with their general condition of health (physically and psychologically) and their views on future training interventions on health and safety (H&S) issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological tools used were questionnaires completed by 213 nurses, who were working in various units of three Greek hospitals and structured interviews conducted with ten nurses, which allowed the researchers to explore more thoroughly the respondents' views/feelings on H&S risks, implications and training.

Findings

The most frequent hazard identified by nurses was hepatitis (biohazard), latex gloves and antiseptics (chemical hazards). The respondents declared that they consistently apply self-protection measures. They also acknowledged the importance of having a support mechanism among colleagues, which would provide them help when needed. They also appeared very keen on attending regularly H&S training programs, especially if these programs were administered during working hours.

Originality/value

The research has explored all types of health hazards (physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial) faced by nurses. The results of this study could be useful to hospital managers and H&S professionals who wish to take active measures in order to provide a safer working environment. There could also be comparisons with other similar research in other units/hospitals/health systems/countries, so as to examine whether – and for what reasons – there are differences in the way health professionals experience exposure to risk factors. Finally, this study might be useful to training designers/providers, who need to obtain a better understanding on nurses' educational/training needs when they organize and administer their various H&S training interventions.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Nilda Tri Putri, Ajeng Rhamadani and Wisnel Wisnel

This paper aims to identify the hazards in the production process and designing standard operational procedure (SOP) in producing beef jerky (dendeng Lambok). This SOP is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the hazards in the production process and designing standard operational procedure (SOP) in producing beef jerky (dendeng Lambok). This SOP is designed with the application of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) that aimed to be a standard guideline for producing dendeng lambok products that are safe for consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Problems that are generally found in the food industry are that there are many products, which do not meet food safety standards so that these products are not safe for consumption. The method can be used in dealing with these problems is to apply HACCP and design the SOP for the production of dendeng lambok. The initial data used are a flow diagram of the dendeng lambok production process. Flowchart of dendeng lambok production process is needed to identify hazards in each process. Based on the identification of hazards in each process, a process is included in the critical control point (CCP). Furthermore, SOP is designed for processes that enter CCPs.

Findings

Based on the application of HACCP, there are four processes that are included in the CCP consisting of boiling beef, beef frying, chili frying and packaging. SOP is designed for processes included in the CCP so that they can be used as standard guidelines in the dendeng lambok production process in producing products that are safe for consumption.

Research limitations/implications

HACCP is a method that is widely applied to ensure the products produced are safe for consumption. Based on previous research studies, the application of HACCP can reduce the hazard to food and the resulting product is safe for consumption. The application of HACCP can also improve the safety and quality of products, thereby causing a decrease in overall costs and increasing company revenue.

Practical implications

This research can only be useful for one of the small and medium food-industries in West Sumatra, Indonesia. It is, namely, Asal Seiya Sekata (ASESE), Ltd. This is because the SOP is designed in accordance with the conditions and problems in the dendeng lambok production process at ASESE, Ltd.

Social implications

This research is expected to help ASESE, Ltd. in maintaining the quality and safety of the produced dendeng lambok products. HACCP is applied in the production process dendeng lambok done to minimize the hazards of each production process dendeng lambok. The SOP is given as a standard guideline in the production process of dendeng lambok in producing products that are safe for consumption.

Originality/value

SOP designed can be used as a reference or guideline in the production process of dendeng lambok to reduce hazards in the process that included in the CCP. SOP designed for boiling beef, beef frying, chili frying and packaging.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Akinlolu Temisola Mariam, Oladimeji Benedict Olalusi and Theo C. Haupt

This paper aims to present a meta-analysis and scientometric review to explore the intellectual evolution of research on the health and safety of women in construction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a meta-analysis and scientometric review to explore the intellectual evolution of research on the health and safety of women in construction, identify trends and research patterns and workplace stressors and hazards encountered by women in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of scientometric analysis and meta-analysis was adopted to systematically review 32 relevant studies from 1984 to 2020, to provide a holistic review of research on women’s health and safety in construction aimed to identify the trend of research development. Techniques such as co-authorship, keyword co-occurring and cluster analysis were adopted.

Findings

Five main themes summarized by clustering focusing on Workplace Psychological Health, HIV/AIDS and Construction Work, Occupational Health and Safety Injuries, Gender Inclusivity and Sexism in Construction and Gender-specific Health and Safety Analysis. Findings revealed a slow growth in women’s health and safety research with the USA, South Africa, Australia and Japan leading research development. Additionally, the major stressors or hazards faced by women in construction were found to be biological related hazards.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study are limited, resulting from the use of one abstract and citation database.

Practical implications

Findings from the study provide insights to the health and safety challenges of women in construction and identifies of knowledge gaps in the existing literature could provide researchers and industry practitioners with a comprehensive insight into intellectual landscapes, potential research frontiers on technologies for women’s construction health and safety.

Originality/value

While numerous studies have focused on the health and safety of workers in the construction industry, research on women’s health and safety is lacking. The study adopted a scientometric and meta-analysis approach to explore the intellectual evolution and reflect the research status on the subject.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Wai‐On Phoon

Reports that among the major current problems in Asia‐Pacific countries are those due to heat, heavy metals, organic solvents, pesticides, carcinogens, dusts, reproductive…

Abstract

Reports that among the major current problems in Asia‐Pacific countries are those due to heat, heavy metals, organic solvents, pesticides, carcinogens, dusts, reproductive hazards, biological hazards, and psychosocial problems, including work stress. The relative importance differs from country to country.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Keyvan Amjadi and Kashif Hussain

The aim of the study is to integrate food hygiene into quantity food production systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to integrate food hygiene into quantity food production systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study illustrates the concepts of food hygiene and standard operation of food production systems in detail, and it integrates both of these concepts evidencing that an integrated system can be used as a primary function of every establishment with regard to serving food safely.

Findings

A successful food hygiene system must consist of four components: maintaining safe conditions for the food from the time of purchasing to the time it is served to the customer, development of hygienic behavior in the employees that come in contact, in any way, with the customers’ meal, maintaining clean and sanitary facilities, and application of an adequate Pest Control Management system.

Originality/value

By integrating food hygiene into the operational systems, a powerful message will be sent to the personnel; that food hygiene is a primary function of the establishment and must at all times be enforced.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

James Xolani Nyawera and Theodore Conrad Haupt

This paper aims to report on the development of a model to improve process health and safety within the context of a petrochemical environment to achieve a generative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the development of a model to improve process health and safety within the context of a petrochemical environment to achieve a generative health and safety culture within that sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology and deductive research approach were used in the study. A survey was conducted in a major petrochemical enterprise in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa with 259 returned and duly completed questionnaires. The data was statistically analysed using statistical packages for social science version 25.

Findings

This study found that the key process health and safety critical drivers needed to grow a generative process health and safety culture were leadership commitment, chemical exposure management, health and safety risk assessment, process hazard analysis and permit to work.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa within the petrochemical industry. Because of self-reported methods of data collection, there is a probability of bias existing in the results of the study.

Practical implications

The contribution of this research is to understand, based on theoretical assumptions, how health and safety improvement could be institutionalised in an organisation. The developed model can be used as a practical tool.

Social implications

This paper is part of the larger discussion of increasing importance in health and safety policy-making. This study aims at contributing to the literature in the field of health and safety by incorporating the drivers towards a generative process health and safety culture.

Originality/value

This study provides a model to assist senior management to reduce exposure to process health and safety hazards in the petrochemical industry and improve overall performance.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Tran Nu Quy Linh, Tran Thi Tuyet Hanh and Rajib Shaw

This paper aims to analyze the current responses applied in Vietnam to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and link these measures to priority actions highlighted…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the current responses applied in Vietnam to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and link these measures to priority actions highlighted in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR). From there, strengths, limitations and recommendations on applying the SFDRR to build the pandemic resilience in the future are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors synthesize literature on response measures to the COVID-19 pandemic in Vietnam from January to June 2020 and compare to four priority actions of the SFDRR including understanding risk, strengthening governance, investing in risk reduction for resilience and enhancing preparedness for effective response and resilient recovery.

Findings

Vietnam has effectively controlled the pandemic with 401 infected cases and no death so far. Well preparation, timely policies’ implementation, risk communication and comprehensive approaches are key strategies. These measures are same as the four priority actions in the SFDRR.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study in Vietnam to link the COVID-19 response and the SFDRR, which can serve as an important example for other countries in responding to the pandemic. Some measures have surpassed SFDRR’s guidance, especially preventive responses applied nationwide with strong political will and the community’s commitment accompanied by sanctions. Cultural factors such as the habit of using masks to prevent air pollution have contributed to the good observance of wearing mask regulations during the pandemic. However, some areas that need more attention include specific solutions for vulnerable groups, limiting fake news and ensuring patient privacy.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Kazutaka Kogi

Sheds light on emerging problems in occupational and environmental health in the Asia‐Pacific region which include the changing employment structure, including the…

Abstract

Sheds light on emerging problems in occupational and environmental health in the Asia‐Pacific region which include the changing employment structure, including the increased participation of women and ageing workers, hazards from new kinds of carcinogens and organic chemicals, reproductive hazards, AIDS, technology‐related stress at work, and environmental problems resulting from industrial operations.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

KRISHNAN GOWRI and SEBASTIANO DEPANNI

In order to ensure the health and safety of occupants, buildings must be inspected to check their compliance to current regulatory requirements prompted by occupancy…

Abstract

In order to ensure the health and safety of occupants, buildings must be inspected to check their compliance to current regulatory requirements prompted by occupancy changes, renovations and building code revisions. Recent inspections conducted by Public Works Canada have identified about 1700 occurrences of code violations in 19 buildings. There is an enormous amount of information that can be extracted from the study mentioned above to implement a knowledge‐based expert system to assist in future building inspections. The philosophy of this expert system is to integrate both knowledge‐based and hypertext representation techniques to enable building inspectors to quickly identify code violations, refer to the code text and provide case study information that can assist in resolving a problem. The present paper describes the development framework and details of a prototype implementation known as the Health and Safety Expert System (HASES). The HASES currently addresses the requirements of ‘Section 3.4: Requirements for Exits’ of the 1990 National Building Code of Canada. The software architecture consists of an external database of building details, an object hierarchy and a rule‐base representing the code requirements, hypertext user‐interface for code text and case study information. The ultimate objective is to make this system available for field inspections using notepad computers.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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