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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Rosa Gabriela Galindo, Maria Simona Chiș, Nuria Martínez-Navarrete and María del Mar Camacho

The waste generated in the process of obtaining orange juice (J) may be used as a natural source of bioactive compounds, thus contributing to the profitability and…

Abstract

Purpose

The waste generated in the process of obtaining orange juice (J) may be used as a natural source of bioactive compounds, thus contributing to the profitability and sustainability of the process. To offer orange J as a dried matter would contribute to the integral valorisation of the J waste and also may expand the field of application.

Design/methodology/approach

To find out whether the JW matrix protects the bioactive compounds, the study compares the behaviour of the extracts of the compounds against drying with that resulting from drying the JW for further extraction. Dehydration was carried out at 25 or 50 C and gum Arabic (GA) and bamboo fibre (BF) were used as stabilising biopolymers (Bp). Vitamin C (VC) (L-ascorbic and L-dehydroascorbic acids [AA and DHAA, respectively]) and hesperidin (HES) were analysed before and after the drying.

Findings

The results suggest that to dry the JW gives a higher yield of bioactive compounds, which are also more stable, than when the extract is dried. Furthermore, both the higher temperature and the presence of the Bp favour the extraction of both VC and HES. In this way, all the waste from the orange J-processing industries is converted into a high-value product to be used for cosmeceutical or nutraceutical purposes and also as an ingredient for human food.

Social implications

The utilisation of organic waste for use in human food, but also in other sectors, is part of the new economic model that aims to do away with the concept of waste as people know it, focussing on a new paradigm in which each resource is a nutrient for nature, industry or society.

Originality/value

The results suggest that to dry the waste gives a higher yield of bioactive compounds, which are also more stable, than when the extract is dried. Furthermore, both the higher temperature and the presence of the Bp favour the extraction of both VC and HES. In that way, all the waste from the orange J-processing industries are converted into a high-value product to be used for cosmeceutical or nutraceutical purposes and also as an ingredient for human food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Amrita Poonia and Surabhi Pandey

The purpose of this paper is to review the nutritional composition, phytochemicals and bioactive compounds of black rice such as flavonoids, phenolic compounds and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the nutritional composition, phytochemicals and bioactive compounds of black rice such as flavonoids, phenolic compounds and their health benefits. Black rice has also been used in medicine and for curing diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Green technologies such as microwave-assisted extraction, supercritical fluid extraction and pulse electric field assisted extraction are very useful for the extraction of bioactive compounds as these reduce the use of energy and are environmental friendly. Black rice in different forms can be incorporated in various food products such as bakery, dairy and meat products.

Design/methodology/approach

Information and data were collected from different sources such as Google Scholar, Research Gate, online journals available at Banaras Hindu University library, Web of Science and Scopus. A database of more than 80 scientific sources from different sources was made as per the headings and subheadings of the paper.

Findings

Black rice is a type of rice species (Oryza sativa L.) and very good source of various nutrients and one of the nutritious varieties of rice. It is a good reservoir of essential amino acids such as lysine, tryptophan, minerals including iron, calcium, phosphorus, zinc and selenium; vitamins such as vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and folic acid. Various recent methods of extraction of bioactive compounds from black rice are suggested.

Originality/value

Researchers and scientists have considered black rice as a “Super Food” because of its nutritional profile. Black rice has antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anticancer activity, antihyperlipidemia and antihyperglycemia and anti-allergic activity. There is a need to create awareness among the consumers about its nutritional profile and therapeutic properties.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

R. L. Bhardwaj and Urvashi Nandal

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the scientific information of various qualities of bael fruit juice used in traditional system of medicine for variety of…

532

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the scientific information of various qualities of bael fruit juice used in traditional system of medicine for variety of purposes. Utilization of bael fruit juice in day-to-day life has great nutritional, therapeutic, and commercial importance. Bael fruit contains nutrients like vitamins (riboflavin), minerals, trace elements, energy and phytochemicals, including flavonoids, polyphenols and antioxidants, that have been shown to have varied health benefits. In past few decades, bael has been extensively studied for its medicinal properties by advanced scientific techniques, and a variety of bioactive compounds like marmelosin, tannins, alkaloids, coumarins, steroids, rutacine, y-sitosterol, psoralin, xanthotoxin, scopolotein, aegelemine, aegeline, marmeline, fragrine, dictamine, cinnamide and different derivatives of cinnamide have been isolated from its fruit juice.

Design/methodology/approach

The medicinal value of bael fruit is very high when the harvests just begin to ripen. As a result, it has a high demand as alternative medicine for curing the diseases like diabetes, high cholesterol, peptic ulcer, inflammation, diarrhea and dysentery, constipation, respiratory infection. Furthermore, the bael fruit juice has anticancer, cardio protective, antibacterial, antifungal, radio protective, antipyretic, analgesic, antioxidant, antiviral, anthelmintic and anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, wound healing properties. The ripe fruit juice is aromatic, has cooling and laxative effects, and arrests secretion or bleeding.

Findings

The unripe or half-ripe fruit juice is good for digestion, useful in preventing or curing scurvy, and it strengthens the stomach action. It helps in the healing of ulcerated intestinal surfaces and has appreciable activity against intestinal pathogenic organisms. The present review summarizes the scientific information of various qualities of bael fruit juice used in traditional system of medicine for a variety of purposes.

Originality/value

It is quite evident from this review that bael is an important medicinal herb and extensively used in Ayurveda, Siddha and other medicinal systems. Bael fruit juice is an excellent source of water and natural sugar and is important principally for containing vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, antioxidants, pigments, energy, organic acids, dietary fiber and other food components, which are the key factors in the medicinal value of this plant. Moreover, mechanisms of action of a few bioactive compounds have been identified so far.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Hamed Saberian, Zohreh Hamidi‐Esfahani and Soleiman Abbasi

Aloe vera gel has nutritional and therapeutic properties due to presence of bioactive components. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pasteurization and…

Abstract

Purpose

Aloe vera gel has nutritional and therapeutic properties due to presence of bioactive components. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pasteurization and storage time at different temperatures on some bioactive components of Aloe vera gel juice.

Design/methodology/approach

Aloe vera gel juice (Aloe barbadensis Miller) was pasteurized at 90°C for 1 min and stored up to 30 days at 4 and 25°C. The effect of pasteurization and storage time on glucomannan, vitamin C, DPPH inhibition (percent) and color of the juice was evaluated.

Findings

The results showed that pasteurization reduced vitamin C content and antioxidant activity 16% and 57%, respectively. During storage at 4 and 25°C, vitamin C and glucomannan contents reduced from 84.47 to 54.96 and 46.82 mg vitamin C/100 g dm and from 2.11 to 1.77 and 1.71 g/L, respectively. DPPH inhibition (percent) and Browning index (BI) increased significantly at both storage temperatures, which was more intensive at 25 than 4°C.

Originality/value

This paper is believed to be the only one which investigates the effect of thermal pasteurization and storage time at different temperatures on some bioactive components of Aloe vera gel juice.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Shweta Suri, Deepika Kathuria, Anusha Mishra and Rajan Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the biological activities of low-calorie natural sweetener, i.e. monk fruit (Siraitia grosvenorii), which are associated with its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the biological activities of low-calorie natural sweetener, i.e. monk fruit (Siraitia grosvenorii), which are associated with its bioactive constituents.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent investigations focused on biochemical characterization and nutraceutical potential of monk fruit (traditional Chinese perennial vine) have been critically reviewed. Also, the safety and influence of monk fruit on organoleptic characteristics of prepared food products have been documented.

Findings

Biochemistry of monk fruit revealed that mogrosides are the principal compounds responsible for the high-intensity sweetness in the monk fruit. The fruit induces several biological activities including anti-oxidative effect, hypoglycemic response, anti-allergic properties, anti-carcinogenic and anti-tissue damage activities. Attributing to great potential as a bio-functional sweetener in food products, monk fruit extract has been approved as Generally Regarded as Safe.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the biological potential of monk fruit opening the doors to future investigations for its utilization in products of commercial importance including food and pharmaceutical preparations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Seok-Tyug Tan, Amin Ismail, Muhajir Hamid, Pei-Pei Chong, Jian Sun and Seok-Shin Tan

Literature has shown that phenolic acids and flavonoids are bearing with hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic properties. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature has shown that phenolic acids and flavonoids are bearing with hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic properties. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the possibility of phenolic-rich soya bean husk powder extract (SHPE) in combating diabetes and obesity using in vitro models.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypoglycemic properties were evaluated by determining the ability of SHPE (25-100 µg/mL) in inhibiting a-amylase and a-glucosidase enzymes and in triggering insulin secretion in BRIN-BD11 cells. Murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes were used for evaluating the anti-adipogenic properties of SHPE through the determination of relative lipid accumulation, triglyceride content and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity.

Findings

The hypoglycemic properties of SHPE was in the dose-dependent manner, where 100 µg SHPE/mL exhibited a significant higher (p < 0.05) a-amylase inhibitory activity (56.8 ± 0.11 per cent) and insulin secretion activity (0.73 ± 0.02 µg/l) against other concentrations. In contrast to the aforementioned findings, a significant lower a-glucosidase inhibitory activity (52.0 ± 0.44 per cent) was also observed in 100 µg SHPE/mL. Nevertheless, findings revealed that all the SHPE were able to inhibit the activity of a-amylase and a-glucosidase and stimulated the insulin secretion in BRIN-BD11 cells. On the other hand, the anti-adipogenic properties of SHPE were in the reverse dose-dependent manner, where 100 µg SHPE/mL demonstrated a significant lower (p < 0.05) relative lipid accumulation (48.5 ± 0.03 per cent), intracellular triglyceride content (5.7 ± 0.07 mg/dL) and GPDH activity (1.0 ± 0.01 mU/mL). These findings reflected that 100 µg SHPE/mL was a potent anti-adipogenic agent when compared with other concentrations. In conclusion, soya husk could emerge as a potential hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic agents in in vitro models.

Originality/value

This was the first study to explore the effectiveness of phytochemicals derived from soya bean husk in ameliorating hyperglycemia and adipogenesis. Promising findings that derived from the present study could enable the scientists to re-evaluate the potential use of agricultural wastes, especially in the formulation of nutraceuticals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Raffaella Preti and Anna Maria Tarola

Urban beekeeping is spreading as an answer to promote bee conservation and to develop local economies. This study aims to highlight nutritional properties of polyfloral…

Abstract

Purpose

Urban beekeeping is spreading as an answer to promote bee conservation and to develop local economies. This study aims to highlight nutritional properties of polyfloral honeys produced in urban landscape and to compare them to the countryside counterparts.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has examined polyfloral urban honeys from a restricted area in Central Italy, for antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and 15 polyphenols profile. Physicochemical parameters have been also determined to assess the overall quality of the samples. Results were compared with polyfloral honeys produced in surrounding countryside and monitored in two harvest years, 2018 and 2019. Principal component analysis was applied to the data to disclose significant differences among honeys and harvest years.

Findings

Urban honeys revealed up to threefold higher total amount of polyphenols with respect to rural honeys, and in the 2019 harvest, despite water scarcity that affected the national production, demonstrated 50% higher antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. The majority of the 15 polyphenols studied resulted in more abundant urban honeys, in particular in the 2019 harvest. The multivariate analysis evidenced how honeys could be successfully separated according to their production area and harvest year by their different polyphenols profile.

Originality/value

Limited data are available on nutritional properties of urban honeys and on their content in antioxidants. The present results suggest that the cultivated urban environment, with its large floral biodiversity, can provide extra nutrition for bees, resulting in the production of a honey rich in nutraceutical compounds.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

H.M. Dilnawaz, Sunil Kumar and Z.F. Bhat

This paper aims to to explore the possibility of utilization of Ipomoea batatas as a novel binding agent for hot-set restructured meat products. Further, green coffee bean…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to to explore the possibility of utilization of Ipomoea batatas as a novel binding agent for hot-set restructured meat products. Further, green coffee bean (GCB) extract was used as a natural ingredient to improve the lipid oxidative stability and storage quality of the developed restructured mutton blocks.

Design/methodology/approach

Restructured mutton blocks were used as a model and were prepared by incorporating different levels of I. batatas, namely, 1, 3 and 5 per cent and analyzed for various quality parameters. Restructured mutton blocks containing optimum level of I. batatas were further treated with GCB (1 per cent) extract as a natural ingredient and assessed for various lipid oxidative stability and storage quality parameters under refrigerated conditions (4 ± 1°C).

Findings

Restructured mutton blocks containing 3 per cent level of I. batatas were optimized as best on the basis of various quality parameters. Although a significant declining trend was observed in the sensory characteristics with storage; however, the products containing GCB extract showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher acceptability. The mean scores for overall acceptability for products with GCB extract on day 0 was 7.4 ± 0.1 and for control was 7.3 ± <0.1. Significantly (p < 0.05) lower thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS, mg malonaldehyde/kg) and free fatty acid (FFA, % oleic acid) values were observed for the products containing GCB extract. The mean TBARS and FFA values for products with GCB extract on day 0 were 0.2 ± <0.1 and 0.08 ± <0.1 and for control were 0.3 ± <0.1 and 0.09 ± <0.1, respectively. The restructured mutton blocks containing GCB extract also showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower values for various microbiological characteristics like total plate count (log cfu/g) and psychrophilic count (log cfu/g).

Originality/value

The results showed herein indicate a promising industrial application of I. batatas (3 per cent) as a binding agent for restructured meat products and GCB extract (1 per cent) as a novel natural ingredient for improved lipid oxidative stability and storage quality.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Sanaa Yahia, Souhila Benomar, Faiza Dehiba, Amine Allaoui, Natalia Guillen, Maria Jesús Rodriguez-Yoldi, Jesús Osada and Ahmed Boualga

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) protein hydrolysates prepared at two degrees of hydrolysis (DH) on lipoprotein profile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) protein hydrolysates prepared at two degrees of hydrolysis (DH) on lipoprotein profile and on oxidant status in cholesterol-fed rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighteen male Wistar rats (220 ± 10 g) were divided into three groups and fed for 30 days a diet containing 20 per cent casein supplemented with 1 per cent cholesterol and 0.5 per cent cholic acid. During the experimentation, the first and the second groups received daily by gavage 250 mg of chickpea protein hydrolysates/rat at DH = 8 per cent (CPH8) and DH = 17 per cent (CPH17), respectively. The third group, named control group (CG), received water under the same conditions.

Findings

Serum total cholesterol concentrations were reduced in CPH8 (p < 0.0073) and CPH17 (p < 0.0004) groups versus CG. This reduction corresponded to a lower very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-cholesterol (p < 0,0019). CPH17 reduced low-density lipoprotein- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (p < 0.0001) but increased apolipoprotein A4 (p < 0.002) concentrations and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity (p < 0.0001). APOA1 remained unchanged in the treated groups. Liver total and esterified cholesterol contents were twofold lower in both treated groups versus CG. CPH8 increased triacylglycerols and phospholipids (p < 0.0001) contents, while CPH17 decreased those of unesterified cholesterol (p < 0.0016). Compared with CG, CPH8 and CPH17 reduced serum (p < 0.0001) and lipoprotein hydroperoxides by stimulating paraoxonase activity (p < 0.0001). However, only CPH17 treatment reduced serum, VLDL- and HDL-malondialdehyde contents and improved glutathione peroxidase activity (p < 0.061).

Originality/value

Thus, chickpea protein hydrolysates and especially hydrolysed at DH = 17 per cent may have a great potential for use as a nutraceutical to reduce hypercholesterolaemia and, by consequence, oxidative stress. Therefore, the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis has a significant influence on the production of potent bioactive peptides.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Sukhdeep Kaur and Kiran Bains

The importance of nutraceuticals and functional foods has been a topic of interest in nutrition research for many years. This review aims to summarize the findings on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of nutraceuticals and functional foods has been a topic of interest in nutrition research for many years. This review aims to summarize the findings on the nutritive value and health benefits of chia, as well as its use as a food fortificant.

Design/methodology/approach

Published literature on the nutritive value and therapeutic properties of chia has been reviewed.

Findings

Chia, an ancient grain, belongs to the mint family (Lamiaceae) and was cultivated in Mexico and Guatemala by the Mayas and Aztecs of a pre-Columbian era. In addition to being gluten-free, chia seeds are concentrated source of omega-3 fatty acids (mainly α-linolenic acid), fiber (insoluble) and polyphenolic compounds (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, chlorogenic and caffeic acids), which were found to be comparatively higher than many other grains, cereals and oily seeds. Chia supplementation has potential to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, pruritus and celiac disease. Because of its nutraceutical and physiochemical properties, chia has been widely used as a whole seed, flour, seed mucilage, gel and oil for developing various enriched food products, such as bread, pasta, cakes, cookies, chips, cheese, yoghurt, meat, fish and poultry.

Originality/value

With advancement in nutrition research, chia would have a great future perspective as feed, food and medicine. However, further research is needed to validate the potential therapeutic effect of chia supplementation on human health.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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