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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Chung‐Hsing Yeh

An effective production planning and control system requirescombining the bill of material (BOM) and routeing data to reflect thematerial flow through the production…

1130

Abstract

An effective production planning and control system requires combining the bill of material (BOM) and routeing data to reflect the material flow through the production process. Presents an integrated BOM and routeing data model which allows flexibility in handling relationships between materials and operations to suit specific needs. It can also be used as a standard data resource for creating production jobs. Maintaining job data independently of the BOM and routeing data allows the system to accommodate a wide range of production variations in practice. In a make‐to‐order environment, jobs are created for making line items on customer orders. To manage customer orders better, develops an extended job model to allow line items of a customer order to be made by one job. Perceives the concept of the extended job model as having considerable value in a wide range of production applications.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Premaratne Samaranayake

The main purpose of this paper is to document the research on development of a conceptual framework for the supply chain. The aims of the research were to develop an…

12262

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to document the research on development of a conceptual framework for the supply chain. The aims of the research were to develop an integrated framework, and to provide a methodology for planning of many components in the supply chain such as suppliers, materials, resources, warehouses, activities and customers. The proposed framework is based on the unitary structuring technique where bills of materials, bills of warehouses, project networks and operations routings, in both manufacturing and distribution networks, are combined into a single structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is described along with illustrated numerical examples in the manufacturing and distribution environments.

Findings

The numerical testing has shown that each network in the supply chain provides an integrated approach to planning and execution of many components, and is capable of providing visibility, flexibility and maintainability for further improvement in the supply chain environment.

Originality/value

The framework and planning approach developed in this research are new in the area of supply chain management and provide a foundation for planning, control and execution in supply chain in various industries.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Wannapa Kay Mahamaneerat, Chi‐Ren Shyu, Shih‐Chun Ho and C. Alec Chang

The purpose of this paper is to provide a novel domain‐concept association rules (DCAR) mining algorithm that offers solutions to complex cell formation problems, which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a novel domain‐concept association rules (DCAR) mining algorithm that offers solutions to complex cell formation problems, which consist of a non‐binary machine‐component (MC) matrix and production factors for fast and accurate decision support.

Design/methodology/approach

The DCAR algorithm first identifies the domain‐concept from the demand history and then performs association rule mining to find associations among machines. After that, the algorithm forms machine‐cells with a series of inclusion and exclusion processes to minimize inter‐cell material movement and intra‐cell void element costs as well as to maximize the grouping efficacy with the constraints of bill of material (BOM) and the maximum number of machines allowed for each cell.

Findings

The DCAR algorithm delivers either comparable or better results than the existing approaches using known binary datasets. The paper demonstrates that the DCAR can obtain satisfying machine‐cells with production costs when extra parameters are needed.

Research limitations/implications

The DCAR algorithm adapts the idea of the sequential forward floating selection (SFFS) to iteratively evaluate and arrange machine‐cells until the result is stabilized. The SFFS is an improvement over a greedy version of the algorithm, but can only ensure sub‐optimal solutions. Practical implications – The DCAR algorithm considers a wide range of production parameters, which make the algorithm suitable to the real‐world manufacturing system settings.

Originality/value

The proposed DCAR algorithm is unlike other array‐based algorithms. It can group non‐binary MC matrix with considerations of real‐world factors including product demand, BOM, costs, and maximum number of machines allowed for each cell.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jun Du, Yuan‐Yuan Jiao and Jianxin Jiao

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing…

1775

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing customized products to meet diverse customer needs, the number of product variants increases exponentially in mass customization. In a situation of assembly‐to‐order production, production planning and control involve not only product variety, but also process variety. It is imperative to synchronize product and process variety in a coherent manner.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses integrated product and production data management for assembly‐to‐order production. An integrated BOM and routing generator is proposed for the purpose of unifying BOM and assembly‐planning data in order to accommodate a wide range of product variability and production variations.

Findings

An integrated BOM and routing generator excels in variety synchronization for assembly‐to‐order production planning.

Research limitations/implications

Variety synchronization opens many opportunities for research into mass customization production. It is important to deal with not only the results of high variety production but also the causes of process variations.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is applicable to manage high variety production like mass customization.

Originality/value

The paper proposes the variety synchronization issue in mass customization. An object‐oriented methodology is applied to manage variety of BOMs and variety of routings.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

Timothy D. Fry, Patrick R. Philipoom, G. Keong Leong and Allen E. Smith

In this paper, the authors investigate the effects bottleneck machines have on the performance of a multi‐stage job shop. The operation performed by the bottleneck and its…

Abstract

In this paper, the authors investigate the effects bottleneck machines have on the performance of a multi‐stage job shop. The operation performed by the bottleneck and its position in the product Bill of Materials is varied to determine the effects on system performance. It was found that the best place for the bottleneck machine to be located was at gateway operations located low in the Bill of Materials.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

P. Samaranayake, G.S. Lewis, E.R.A. Woxvold and D. Toncich

This paper documents research and development that were undertaken as collaboration between the Industrial Research Institute of Swinburne University of Technology (IRIS)…

2690

Abstract

This paper documents research and development that were undertaken as collaboration between the Industrial Research Institute of Swinburne University of Technology (IRIS), Armor Pty Ltd and QANTAS. The objective of the research was to investigate the application of a unitary software structure, composed of the critical path method (CPM), materials requirements planning (MRP) and production activity control (PAC) techniques, to the management of large‐scale maintenance activities (specifically aircraft maintenance). This structure had previously been applied to the manufacturing (i.e. assembly) process but the maintenance problem posed significant new challenges. First, there was the issue of generating a disassembly structure, and second, the reconciliation of demands arising from non‐serviceable components. This paper documents the implementation of the structure and the methods that were used to validate its functionality on a test‐case application (i.e. aircraft maintenance problem).

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Yuval Cohen

The purpose of this paper is to describe a comprehensive modelling technique that supports the assembly of very complex products that require intensive use of both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a comprehensive modelling technique that supports the assembly of very complex products that require intensive use of both computerized worker guidance and automation. The modelling enables the planning of this complex process.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed approach utilizes and extends typical product documentation (such as route cards and bill of materials (BOM)) to form hierarchical Petri net in a stepwise process. The suggested framework models the dynamic progress of the assembly process, and can generate route card instructions for manual operations, or ladder diagrams (LDs) for automation.

Findings

The model can help the generation of computerized control over route cards for manual assembly operations. For automated processes, the translation algorithm of the model to LD enables its application on currently available equipment (programmable logic controllers (PLCs)).

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework heavily depends on the BOM data quality. So it is crucial to verify that the BOM data is not ill-defined before applying the proposed framework. Future research could report on the implementation of this model in assembly processes, or suggest another modelling technique.

Practical implications

The model enables the integration of computer control over both manual and automated assembly processes. This enables seamless transition between these two very different operations. This ability carries the promise of reducing the cost of code generation and maintenance, and contributes to the progress towards more flexible automation.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new comprehensive modelling technique that may support planning, simulating, tracing, and controlling the assembly process. The technique for the first time integrates modelling of both manual and automated assembly operation.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Shraddha Mishra and Surya Prakash Singh

Emission reduction methodologies alone are not sufficient to mitigate the climatic catastrophes caused due to ongoing carbon emissions. Rather, a bidirectional approach is…

Abstract

Purpose

Emission reduction methodologies alone are not sufficient to mitigate the climatic catastrophes caused due to ongoing carbon emissions. Rather, a bidirectional approach is required to decarbonize the excess carbon in the atmosphere through carbon sequestration along with carbon reduction. Since the manufacturing sector contributes heavily to the ongoing carbon emissions, the purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for carbon emission reduction and carbon sequestration in the context of the manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, life cycle assessment (LCA) is employed to track the carbon emission at each stage of the product development life cycle. The pre-requisite for this is the accurate evaluation of the carbon emissions. Therefore, IoT technologies have been employed for collecting real-time data with high credibility to perceive environmental impact caused during the entire life cycle of the product. The total carbon emission calculation is based on the bill of material (BOM)-based LCA of the product to realize the multi-structure (from parts and components to product) as well as multi-stage (from cradle to gate) carbon emission evaluation. Carbon sequestration due to plantation is evaluated using root-shoot ratio and total biomass.

Findings

A five interwoven layered structure is proposed in the paper to facilitate the real-time data collection and carbon emission evaluation using BOM-based LCA of products. Further, a carbon neutral coefficient (CNC) is proposed to indicate the state of a firm’s carbon sink and carbon emissions. CNC=1 indicates that the firm is carbon neutral. CNC >1 implies that the firm’s carbon sequestration is more than carbon emissions. CNC <1 indicates that the firm’s carbon emission is more than the carbon sink.

Originality/value

The paper provides a novel framework which integrates the real-time data collection and evaluation of carbon emissions with the carbon sequestration.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Maria Christofi, Miguel Nunes, Guo Chao Peng and Angela Lin

ERP systems are not the exclusive concern of large companies anymore. More and more small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are now engaging with the implementation and…

1736

Abstract

Purpose

ERP systems are not the exclusive concern of large companies anymore. More and more small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are now engaging with the implementation and exploitation of this type of system. However, reports of ERP failure are numerous and frequent. Very often, this failure results from technical and implementation problems. But even more frequently, it is due to lack of preparation, by the companies themselves, for the implementation process. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to identify and explore ways in which SMEs may need to prepare themselves before implementing ERP systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The research took a Cypriot SME as a case study and adopted an inductive approach supported by in-depth interviews as the main method of data collection. The qualitative data collected were analysed by using a thematic analysis approach. Subsequently, a rich picture and concept maps were used to represent the findings generated.

Findings

The study identified that business deficiencies and problems, which can impact potential ERP adoption and usage in SMEs, can be localised across business processes boundaries, such as sales order processing, stock control, and bill of materials management, etc. These business problems were found to be attributed to a variety of organisational, technical and human-related reasons. Therefore, this study established that in order to implement ERPs successfully, organisations may require changes in people's work practices and understanding of technology, ownership and control of business processes, as well as organisational wide policies.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the knowledge of ERP preparation and business process improvement in SMEs.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper provide useful insights for both academic and practitioners who are thinking of implementing ERP systems. The paper contributes to the body of literature on issues that SMEs may need to reflect upon before embarking in a costly and resource intensive process of ERP implementation.

Originality/value

Business process improvement is traditionally considered as the result of an ERP project phase. This is how the large majority of the academic literature and the totality of marketing information by ERP vendors portray it. In fact, the reality of practice shows a different scenario with frequent reports of failure and inadequate ERP implementation. This paper aims at breaking with this myth, by proposing that ERPs cannot resolve the large variety of deficient business processes and internal problems that may exist in SMEs. Therefore, this study argues that SMEs need to prepare in advance by engaging in business process reviews prior to the ERP implementation that is engaging in a pre-implementation or preparation phase.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Marek J. Greniewski

The purpose of this paper is to present the ability of Z‐notation to formulate formal requirements specification of huge application software based on an example of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the ability of Z‐notation to formulate formal requirements specification of huge application software based on an example of the Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II) Standard System. Z‐notation is using formal transformation approach to obtain operating software instead of traditional programming. The original MRP II software requirement specification possesses descriptive form extended by list of control questions. To make formal requirements specification, the original specification must be extending by some definition taken after APICS Dictionary. The definitions respect such concept as: item, item code, location, and order.

Design/methodology/approach

Writing schemas based on subsystem order of MRP II Standard System and treating the system as three level structures (user interface, business logic, and database), the schemas described business logic level only. As a conclusion was necessity to extend descriptive requirements specification by definitions. The limited size of the presentation contains few examples of formalization process only mainly limited to the main schemas as: item system (full definition), inventory system, bill of material, work centers and routings, generic order system, master production schedule, and material requirement planning.

Findings

As a result of the research, it can be said that Z‐notation apparatus is sufficient to build requirements specifications of big application systems like MRP II, enterprise resource planning, or customer relationship management.

Originality/value

Libraries of typical algorithms like MRP II designed through formal approach could replace traditional programming and open new prospects in the future development of broad computerization.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 342