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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Kent Grayson, Eric Leiserson and Sachin Waikar

Fiserv, a pioneer in electronic payments, would like to increase the number of consumers who receive bills electronically. Currently, adoption is relatively low. To help…

Abstract

Fiserv, a pioneer in electronic payments, would like to increase the number of consumers who receive bills electronically. Currently, adoption is relatively low. To help guide their efforts, Fiserv managers have done extensive customer research and have segmented the market based on customer perceptions of e-billing. Students must recommend which segments to target and why. To support their recommendations, students must calculate the likely financial costs and benefits of adoption, estimate the likely returns for targeting different segments, and make targeting and positioning recommendations based on these calculations. Because Fiserv's direct customers are billers (such as utilities and credit card companies) and its end users are individual consumers, the case allows a focus on both B2B and B2C issues.

This case gives students the opportunity to estimate the relative profitability of different segments and to make targeting and positioning recommendations based on these calculations. It highlights the importance of assessing segments based on both quantitative and qualitative considerations. It also emphasizes the potential difficulties associated with targeting multiple segments at once.

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Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

LAWRENCE ANGUS

The collective interaction of disaffected pupils is often described as a counter‐school subculture or as an informal organization within the school. This paper reports the…

Abstract

The collective interaction of disaffected pupils is often described as a counter‐school subculture or as an informal organization within the school. This paper reports the findings of an Australian ethnography which indicate that such pupils are able not only to assert their own autonomy and to circumvent the institutional axis in which they operate, but are also able to influence what is perceived to be the formal structure of the school.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston

In this chapter, we propose an educational framework to position Information Literacy (IL) and Higher Education (HE) in relation to Lifelong Learning (LLL): comprehensive…

Abstract

In this chapter, we propose an educational framework to position Information Literacy (IL) and Higher Education (HE) in relation to Lifelong Learning (LLL): comprehensive enough to make sense of, and give educational direction to, future development of people in information literate populations. We identify crucial changes in the HE environment, particularly in the United Kingdom; analyse the concept of IL as a discipline, and situate the IL person in the changing information culture and society. In doing this we draw on our own work and that of Schuller and Watson (2009). We propose a curriculum for an information literate lifecourse, sensitive to the context of the individual within a changing information culture. The curriculum is framed, on the one hand, by the nature of the information economy, technology, organisational culture, local/national culture and society, and personal goals. It is also framed by the life stage of the individual, using the four key stages and transitional points proposed by Schuller and Watson (2009). Academics and librarians have a key role in designing and facilitating these IL capabilities for the 21st century citizen.

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Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Bill Johnston and Sheila Webber

This paper aims to identify potential roles for Library and Information Science (LIS) faculty in an information literate University (ILU). The authors note the pressures…

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1304

Abstract

This paper aims to identify potential roles for Library and Information Science (LIS) faculty in an information literate University (ILU). The authors note the pressures on universities for change, and the debates and issues arising from these pressures. They define Information Literacy (IL) and present their concept of the ILU. Two case studies in curriculum development are outlined. The first describes development of compulsory Integrative Studies classes in the Strathclyde University’s Business School. These are taught by a cross‐disciplinary team, and they represent a rethinking of the course curriculum. The second case study, of the IL class at Strathclyde University, provides an example of experimenting with a holistic IL curriculum. Building on this, the authors propose possible roles for LIS faculty within the ILU. The paper concludes by suggesting that LIS faculty have some way to progress in fulfilling all their potential roles.

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New Library World, vol. 105 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Ian Barclay and Mark Benson

A two‐year experimental programme to apply the research findings ofa research programme into the practice and organisation of new productdevelopment is described. It was…

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3068

Abstract

A two‐year experimental programme to apply the research findings of a research programme into the practice and organisation of new product development is described. It was conducted within a large manufacturing subsidiary of a major international organisation. The results from the past research work were converted into a usable form and applied through a planned programme of analysis and change. It describes how the work covering all levels of personnel from general manager to the shop floor staff, was initiated directed and controlled.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Stuart Boon, Bill Johnston and Sheila Webber

The purpose of this research is to identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and compare those conceptions with current information literacy…

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4200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and compare those conceptions with current information literacy standards and frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

Three year AHRB‐funded study involving 80 academics interviewed throughout the UK and using the phenomenographic research method to discover variation in experience leading towards identification of qualitatively different conceptions of information literacy. Conceptions are then reviewed in light of previous research and current librarian‐generated frameworks and standards.

Findings

The findings identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and show them to be both similar to and significantly different from conceptions described in previous research and librarian‐generated frameworks and standards.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on creating a conceptual snapshot‐in‐time for the 20 English academics taking part. The research implies that disciplinary differences in conception of information literacy are significant and suggests further research to assess disciplinary conceptual differences.

Practical implications

Librarians working with English faculty on information literacy need to be aware of differences in conception between themselves and academics to work effectively. The paper also highlights the significance of information literacy in English faculty's teaching and research practices and this relevance suggests that information literacy should be integrated into course and curriculum design.

Originality/value

The paper fills a major gap in literature on information literacy by focussing on conceptions of lecturers, thereby counterbalancing the abundance of work produced by librarians. The paper illustrates the complexity of English academics' conceptions of information literacy and informs academics' use and understanding of information literacy.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Bill Johnston and Aileen Watson

This paper gives a succinct account of current debates in the literature on graduate attributes as they are related to employment and lifelong learning, and argues the…

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1591

Abstract

This paper gives a succinct account of current debates in the literature on graduate attributes as they are related to employment and lifelong learning, and argues the limitations of a “key skills” agenda as a guide to curriculum practice. Development of a curricular innovation that addresses key skills, “integrative studies” at the Strathclyde University Business School, is described and located in a wider framework of work‐related facets that extend thinking beyond key skills. Those facets include the idea of a learning organisation and the concept of student identity formation. A research‐based approach to further development of the curriculum is outlined, which takes the experiences of students and the perceptions and practices of specific employers to be key influences.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

J. Shambora

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195

Abstract

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Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Judging by the amount of Press coverage and the fears of lost revenue emanating from the Treasury, leasing must be an expanding market. How fast is the rate, and what is…

Abstract

Judging by the amount of Press coverage and the fears of lost revenue emanating from the Treasury, leasing must be an expanding market. How fast is the rate, and what is the volume, is difficult to ascertain. The major organisations, the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (of which Interleasing are members) the Equipment Leasing Association and the Finance Houses Association between them cover the market. By a special correspondent from Interleasing (U.K.) Limited.

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Industrial Management, vol. 80 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Mark Hepworth and Geoff Walton

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is…

Abstract

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is organised into four broad areas moving from the strategic to the highly contextualised. The four areas are specifically: strategic view; delivering information literacy education; the link between university and work; beyond higher education. The approach for each chapter is summarised. This chapter also examines the inter-related nature of the concepts of information literacy and information behaviour. It shows how these ideas are contextualised, theorised and researched. The authors argue that far from being conflicting approaches to the same problem of information capability, they are, in fact, complementary. Though these are epistemologically different both have much to offer in terms of explanation and also as tools for fostering information capability. The history of information literacy and information behaviour is overviewed and their inter-relation explored. It is argued that information literacy can be viewed as the practitioners’ model for delivering information capability whilst information behaviour, being more research focussed, explains it. A diagram is presented at the end of the chapter which helps to highlight and summarise the distinctions and similarities between IB and IL research.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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