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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Bill Burnett

We innovate to create competitive advantage. Competitive advantage is found in new knowledge, which solves the buyer's problem. Humans create new knowledge in three ways…

Abstract

We innovate to create competitive advantage. Competitive advantage is found in new knowledge, which solves the buyer's problem. Humans create new knowledge in three ways: through Discovery - stumbling upon something that solves a problem; through Experimentation - trying different approaches to a problem until the solution is found; and through Synthesis - combining existing knowledge to create new knowledge. Today, Synthesis is the most common way we solve problems. Everyone synthesizes, but some people are extraordinarily good at it. They see the big picture, and how all the pieces fit together. Their brains have the ability to reach great mental distances to find remote metaphors which presents knowledge that turns into great solutions. Mixing your experts with people who are novice super-synthesizers can create best in class solutions and give a company a sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Praveen Gupta

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Praveen Gupta

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Keith Crosier

The purpose of this paper is to celebrate the remarkable work of the late Emeritus Professor Michael J. Thomas, as Editor of Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP ) over…

805

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to celebrate the remarkable work of the late Emeritus Professor Michael J. Thomas, as Editor of Marketing Intelligence & Planning (MIP ) over 21 years, and Founding Editor in perpetuity.

Design/methodology/approach

His long‐time Assistant Editor and eventual successor trawls the back issues and plumbs the depths of his own memory, to formalise the story of the man and his creation.

Findings

The undoubted success of MIP, at the time of the editorial handover the third‐most downloaded title in Emerald's massive stable, was entirely attributable to the work of its Founding Editor: his clear vision of an academic journal that was applicable to the real work of intelligence gathering and strategy planning; his extensive personal networks, his professional status, and the sheer force of his personality.

Practical implications

In the overheated current climate of academic research and publication, more journals should consider the merits of editorial prerogative as a precursor to formal double‐blind reviewing in the acceptance process. A strong and focused Editor is a prerequisite, of course.

Originality/value

The paper celebrates the history of MIP and, in the process, the life of Michael Thomas.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

1096

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Lucy Mayblin

Over the past 30 years asylum has become an issue of great political significance, public interest and media coverage in most “Western” countries. Policies and laws…

5490

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past 30 years asylum has become an issue of great political significance, public interest and media coverage in most “Western” countries. Policies and laws designed to deal with asylum seekers have proliferated, as have the resources required to manage them. These developments have come as a result of the rise of asylum as a social, political and economic “problem” which is seen to necessitate urgent action. Within this context, some countries, such as Britain, have sought to limit asylum seekers’ social and economic rights. In Britain specifically this has involved making paid employment illegal for asylum seekers, and in the process making the government liable for the living costs of such individuals – creating a situation of forced welfare dependency. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a review of research into work and welfare policy relating to asylum seekers in Britain. The paper focuses particularly on three key issues which are affected by asylum policies relating to work and welfare. These have all received particular scholarly attention in recent years: destitution, illegal working and forced labour, and the impact on integration outcomes.

Findings

In the final section the author proposes some directions for future research.

Originality/value

The review is, of course, not exhaustive, but does provide an overview of key themes in the literature and should be of interest to scholars interested in the politics, sociology and social policy of asylum.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1901

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by…

Abstract

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by the Act 29 Charles II., cap. 7, “for the better observation of the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday.” At first sight it would seem a palpable absurdity to suppose that a man could escape the penalties of one offence because he has committed another breach of the law at the same time, and in this respect law and common‐sense are, broadly speaking, in agreement; yet there are one or two cases in which at least some show of argument can be brought forward in favour of the opposite contention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Isaac Cheah and Anwar Sadat Shimul

The purpose of this study is to extend existing research on ethics in advertising through investigating the key factors that influence students' reaction towards ethical dilemmas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to extend existing research on ethics in advertising through investigating the key factors that influence students' reaction towards ethical dilemmas.

Design/methodology/approach

Several hypotheses are developed and tested across twenty three ethical dilemma scenarios relative to advertising and business. Using information collected from business students (1297 useable responses) at a large Western Australian university.

Findings

The results indicates significant differences amongst culture, educational background, gender, work experience and corporate culture towards students' reactions to ethical dilemmas.

Practical implications

This research suggests that providing a stronger emphasis on ethics in educational institutions will increase the likeliness for students in behaving ethically. The managerial implications of these findings are also discussed, including the development of a potential ethical work context and programmes that enhance ethical sensitivity. Managers and executives would also benefit from this study by encouraging better ethical performance through understanding employees' behaviour.

Originality/value

Extant studies on ethical dilemmas in advertising highly focus on European's and North American's ethical beliefs. Thus, this paper look at the Western Australian sample of students at a broader context through acknowledging East Asian student sample in Western Australia; Chinese, Indonesian, Malaysian and Taiwanese.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2017

Claire Petri

This chapter analyzes the ways national, international, and library professional policies address Internet access as a human right. This includes documenting the ways…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the ways national, international, and library professional policies address Internet access as a human right. This includes documenting the ways rural libraries fulfill their patrons’ human right to the Internet and demonstrating how Mathiesen’s (2014) framework can be used by library professionals and policymakers to ensure that people have physical, intellectual, and social access to the Web. The author’s intention is to help facilitate a more meaningful definition of access that goes beyond just providing hardware access to bridge the digital divide, but instead asserts the need for librarian assistance and technology training if we wish to allow all members of a society, without exception, to fully enjoy their human rights.

The author analyzes existing national and international policies pertaining to providing information and Internet access in rural and otherwise underserved areas, as well as precedents involving the deployment of previous information and communication technologies (ICTs) in rural areas. This segues into an analysis of barriers to rural Internet access using facets and determinants developed by Mathiesen, leading to the argument that rural librarians’ ability to help underserved populations use the Internet is essential to making Web access meaningful.

  • The United Nations (UN) has supported arguments that people have a right to information access and the technologies that support this, suggesting that Internet access is a human right.

  • The U.S. government has a history of facilitating access to ICTs in rural areas that dates back to 1934 and continues through the present.

  • Funding mechanisms that facilitate Web access in the United States focus primarily on making broadband connections, hardware, and software accessible, leaving out the essential training and assistance components that are essential to making many rural residents and other underserved persons able to actually use the Internet.

The United Nations (UN) has supported arguments that people have a right to information access and the technologies that support this, suggesting that Internet access is a human right.

The U.S. government has a history of facilitating access to ICTs in rural areas that dates back to 1934 and continues through the present.

Funding mechanisms that facilitate Web access in the United States focus primarily on making broadband connections, hardware, and software accessible, leaving out the essential training and assistance components that are essential to making many rural residents and other underserved persons able to actually use the Internet.

Scholarship on rural libraries, including some of the research in this volume, has argued that rural public libraries provide an invaluable service by offering both access to and guidance in using the Internet. While these publications commonly discuss the socioeconomic benefits of providing this access, they often treat the motivation for providing such services as self-evident. This chapter analyzes policies and legal precedents to argue that Internet access for rural residents, through public libraries and other means, is not merely a privilege that will benefit people if funded, but instead a human right that cannot be ignored.

Details

Rural and Small Public Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-112-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Melba Wilson

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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