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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Bill Baker

The purpose of this paper is to help organizational and human resource leaders understand how to use storytelling to engage and align their employees around their

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help organizational and human resource leaders understand how to use storytelling to engage and align their employees around their strategic planning efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper lays out four guidelines organizations and human resource leaders can follow to help ensure their employees not only see the outcomes of their strategic planning efforts (e.g. strategic vision, brand positioning, mission, etc.), but also see themselves in those outcomes and, importantly, understand their role in bringing them to life.

Findings

Storytelling is the way we most naturally communicate with each other as social and interconnected human beings. And yet, many organizations and organizational leaders never consider this timeless craft of humanity in their strategic planning efforts or recognize the role it can play in engaging and aligning employees around – and ultimately, implementing – the strategic vision and brand positioning that often result from those efforts. Organizations that embed storytelling into their strategic planning efforts effectively tap into their human nature to bring more meaning, focus and productivity not only to their work, but also their workforce.

Originality/value

The concept of using storytelling to improve the impact and uptake of a company's strategic planning efforts will benefit organizational leaders and human resource executives who are responsible for the implementation of those plans and the engagement of their employees.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Daniel Salinas and David P. Baker

Recent developments in neuroscience have generated great expectations in the education world globally. However, building a bridge between brain science and education has…

Abstract

Recent developments in neuroscience have generated great expectations in the education world globally. However, building a bridge between brain science and education has been hard. Educational researchers and practitioners more often than not hold unrealistic images of neuroscience, some naively positive and others blindly negative. Neuroscientist looking at how the brain reacts and changes during mental tasks involving reading or mathematics usually discuss education as some constant and undifferentiated “social environment” of the brain, either assuming it to be a “black box” or evoking an image of perfect schooling and full access to it. In this review, we claim that a more productive and realistic relationship between neuroscience and the comparative study of education can be thought about in terms of the hypothesis that formal education is having a significant role in the cognitive and neurological development of human populations around the world. We review research that supports this hypothesis and implications for future studies.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

J.R.P. Evans

There has been an upsurge of interest in management training needs.However, community education has tended to be overlooked. Tied in withupsurge of interest in management…

Abstract

There has been an upsurge of interest in management training needs. However, community education has tended to be overlooked. Tied in with upsurge of interest in management is the interest in paid educational leave. The Baker Education Bill also has implications for community education management. The ways in which local education authorities can make an effective response to management training needs in community education and leisure are examined.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2012

John A. James

The English banking system before the Panic of 1825, apart from the Bank of England, which maintained a monopoly of joint-stock banking, was one of private partnerships…

Abstract

The English banking system before the Panic of 1825, apart from the Bank of England, which maintained a monopoly of joint-stock banking, was one of private partnerships both in London and in the provinces, most of which were independent unit banks. Since remittance was the principal function of country banks at this time close ties in the form of correspondent relations developed between country banks and London agents, similar to the structure prevailing in the United States later in the nineteenth century between New York and interior banks. Although efficient in the transfer of funds across space, these networks also proved to be quite efficient in the transmission of financial pressures during panics.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-246-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Alan C. Porter and Francine J. Rosenberger

In this time of heightened regulatory attention to potential conflicts of interest and the transparency of transaction costs in buying and selling portfolio securities…

Abstract

In this time of heightened regulatory attention to potential conflicts of interest and the transparency of transaction costs in buying and selling portfolio securities, soft dollar practices have come under intense scrutiny. Regulators are asking whether the use of soft dollars should be eliminated, while some in the investment management industry have begun to restrict their own practices or even voluntarily discontinue them. What should you be doing now? Should you be evaluating your soft dollar arrangements? Do you have effective soft dollar policies and procedures in place to maintain compliance with applicable regulatory requirements? Who are the primary beneficiaries of your soft dollar arrangements? This article outlines the background and regulatory considerations applicable to soft dollar arrangements, and discusses the issues money management firms should consider in reviewing their soft dollar practices.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2009

Bill Baker

The practice of destination branding for cities has been increasingly adopted by communities of all sizes and has enjoyed success to varying degrees. The focus of many of…

Abstract

The practice of destination branding for cities has been increasingly adopted by communities of all sizes and has enjoyed success to varying degrees. The focus of many of these branding initiatives has frequently been on the creative elements of logo, tagline, and advertising theme, with only limited consideration for the importance of generating stakeholder support and experience delivery. Active stakeholder engagement, to build the brand from the inside out during its planning process, has been shown to be an important factor in those initiatives that are considered more successful. This chapter highlights the need to engage stakeholders in the brand planning for destinations from the earliest stages. It illustrates a consultative model for destination brand planning, primary with a US case study, along with examples of some other cities.

Details

Tourism Branding: Communities in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-720-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Sylvia C. Hudgins and Richard Gregory

The examination of the differential effects of bailout legislation on well‐capitalized versus under‐capitalized thrifts is the focus of this study. The study examines…

Abstract

The examination of the differential effects of bailout legislation on well‐capitalized versus under‐capitalized thrifts is the focus of this study. The study examines return responses for portfolios of thrift stocks, formed on the basis of capitalization, to news events concerning bailout funding leading up to and concluding with the President's signing of the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 (CEBA). The results indicate thrifts react differently to legislative news events based on their capitalization levels. This is evidenced by 1) the presence of abnormal returns for portfolios of relatively well‐capitalized and relatively under‐capitalized thrifts, 2) the trends in the size of abnormal returns across well‐capitalized (under‐capitalized) portfolios as the average level of capitalization decreases (increases), and 3) the opposite signs of abnormal returns for relatively well‐capitalized versus relatively under‐capitalized portfolios.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which…

Abstract

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which permitted food prices to rise had no chance whatever of surviving, and the result was that food was bountiful and incredibly cheap. Times have changed dramatically but not the attitude of people to the price and availibility of food and, in particular of political control; this is very much the same as always. Mostly, it revolves around the woman and what she sees as an abuse, greed and taking mean advantage of prevailing conditions and, make no mistake, this will be reflected in the political field; in the way she votes. It has happened in previous elections; it will happen in even greater degree in the next election and, although not decisive, it can have a not insignificant impact. None know better than the housewife how meaningless is the smug talk of the politicians when it comes to food prices. Their attitude may not have been the main factor in throwing out the last Conservative Government; this was undoubtedly the fear that their continuance in office would result in widespread strikes and the serious effect these upheavals have on food prices (and other household necessit ies), but the votes of woman were an unimportant contribution. As it was, it mattered little to the muscle men of the trade unions which party is in power. Women's talk around the shops and supermarket's, up and down the High Street to‐day is one long grumble and disillusionment with politicians generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2009

Julio Aramberri, Ph.D., is Professor of Tourism at Drexel University (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Email: ja43@drexel.edu). Previously, he worked for the Spanish…

Abstract

Julio Aramberri, Ph.D., is Professor of Tourism at Drexel University (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Email: ja43@drexel.edu). Previously, he worked for the Spanish Tourist Office in different capacities including the CEO position (1987–1990). He has recently been appointed to be the dean of the School of Cultural Studies at Hoa Sen University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. His areas of research are marketing, consumer behavior, and the sociology of travel and tourism. He has also published in other areas such as political sociology, US life and culture, and global challenges.

Details

Tourism Branding: Communities in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-720-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

David Capps, Simon Firth and Alix Prentice

The past year has seen a flurry of activity from the major international regulators around issues with a common theme: conflicts of interest. The Financial Services…

Abstract

The past year has seen a flurry of activity from the major international regulators around issues with a common theme: conflicts of interest. The Financial Services Authority (FSA), the UK regulator, is no exception. On the sell side, the FSA has consulted twice in 2003 directly on conflicts of interest in the context of investment research and the issuance of securities, as well as making new rules in this area. On the buy side, the FSA shocked the fund management industry with its proposals to limit goods and services that can be bought with commissions and to limit the costs to customers’ funds of acquiring bundled and “softed” services, as well as less explicitly attempting to address conflicts in this area. The issues thrown up by these proposals are considered in this article.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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