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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Bhumi Mahesh Trivedi and Biju Varkkey

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how Aster Retail (AR), UAE, handled career plateau challenge by adopting multiple strategies and earning employee commitment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how Aster Retail (AR), UAE, handled career plateau challenge by adopting multiple strategies and earning employee commitment and motivation for business growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The organization addressed two types of plateaus – structural and content by creating both vertical and lateral opportunities/options for employees, and supporting them with resources to build required capabilities, and managing their career aspirations. The strategies also helped AR to remain true to the organization’s philosophy, “We will treat you well.”

Findings

The study enunciates how HR initiatives can add value by converting the negative phenomenon of plateau, into an opportunity for employees to grow.

Originality/value

The study has three contributions: How in a retail organization with strong promoter principles and values, both structural and content plateau are addressed, and linked with business strategies? The study sheds light on how organizational and HR support for career management addresses employee plateau, particularly for solid citizens. makes the employees feel “not plateaued” at all; and in the long run, why and how HR managers should focus more on proactively addressing content plateau than structural plateau.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Jatinder Kumar Jha, Jatin Pandey and Biju Varkkey

This paper aims to examine the relationship between perceived investments in employees’ development (PIED) on work engagement and the moderating effects of psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between perceived investments in employees’ development (PIED) on work engagement and the moderating effects of psychological capital on this relationship for liquid knowledge workers, employed in the Indian cutting and polishing of diamond industry (CPD).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire composed of established scales was administered to 134 liquid knowledge workers. Having established convergent and discriminant validity using structural equation modelling, the model was further analysed using the Process macro to check for direct and moderating effects.

Findings

The research findings suggest that the perceived investment in employee development and psychological contract enhancement (relational and transactional) made by CPD units for liquid knowledge workers positively influenced their work engagement level. The study also finds that relational contract (not transactional contract) positively moderates the relationship between perceived investment in employee development and work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross-sectional single source study; future studies could look at longitudinal and multisource perspective.

Practical implications

The study presents a “star matrix of engagement” that guides the application of the two strategies of perceived employee development and psychological contract enhancement for liquid knowledge workers. This has implications for design and implementation of human resource management practices and policies for employee management.

Originality/value

The study makes significant contributions to existing literature on antecedents of work engagement of liquid knowledge workers by examining the direct and moderating influences.

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Priyanka Dave, Anamika Sinha and Biju Varkkey

The paper attempts to establish cause and effect between an individual's motivation to learn, workplace learning and the in-role job performance of IT professionals

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to establish cause and effect between an individual's motivation to learn, workplace learning and the in-role job performance of IT professionals

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses descriptive design, with a convenience sample of 531 respondents and uses Sobel's test to test for the mediating effect of Workplace learning on an individual’s motivation to learn and in-role job performance

Findings

It is found that individuals negotiate their own learning and development strategies. If HR designs on workplace learning are well designed, an individual's own motivation may have very little impact on job performance. However, workplace learning initiatives impact job performance very significantly. 10; 10;It was found that Workplace learning interventions significantly impact the relation between an individual’s motivation to learn and in-role performance. Independently, motivation to learn has very little predictability on job performance, but facilitated through workplace learning, it explains 23% of job performance. Work place learning on its own predicts 45% of job performance. An individual's motivation to learn predicts workplace learning by 36%. 10.

Practical implications

These findings can be used as a guide for HR professionals to negotiate training and learning designs, including informal and incidental learning initiatives in a holistic design. It can be used as a secondary source to build a case for training and learning investment.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that has used Sobel's test for studying the mediation effects of Workplace learning on motivation to learn and in-role job performance of professionals in the Indian IT industry. The statistically significant results are an indication for industry leaders to take an action toward improving the learning architecture of firms using a blended approach to formal, informal and incidental learning interventions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Anamika Sinha, Biju Varkkey and N. Meenakshi

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate applicability of design thinking in creating employee centric HR solutions. This application is studied in the context of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate applicability of design thinking in creating employee centric HR solutions. This application is studied in the context of a food tech company. A design thinking process for arriving at an HR solution for employee experience management is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a single case study method. The HR professionals of a food tech company were interviewed to relate their narratives with the existing conceptual framework on design thinking.

Findings

It was found that the firm focused on the technological supremacy as well as developed an engaged and motivated team of delivery boys. This provided the required competitive advantage and growth. The first step in implementing the HR solution was to collect primary data for insights into the pain and gain points in employee’s day to day routine. Using the lens of empathy, multiple touch points through incentive policies, rewards, work engagement tools, feedback, inclusive decision making, and technology enabled learning solutions were designed. These signaled a caring and employee centric leadership and built future orientation and engaged the employees.

Practical implications

By demonstrating the applicability of design thinking and linking it to the HR solutions, a conceptual model relevant to the Food Tech industry was proposed. By integrating the process used to reach the solution, a modified model can be developed by other HR professionals working in any other Food tech company, aggregator/ service providers or logistics companies.

Originality/value

The study is among the initial studies to approach design thinking for HR solutions in a food tech industry.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Anamika Sinha, Biju Varkkey, Surajit Saha and Shiva Kakkar

The paper reports the practices and interventions adopted at a successful business transformation in an Indian family run organization. The firm deployed internal HR…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports the practices and interventions adopted at a successful business transformation in an Indian family run organization. The firm deployed internal HR marketing and large-scale interface to deliver results in terms of improved financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Single case study method and grounded theory approach was used to conceptualise the practices deployed to implement desired change. Multiple interviews and on-site observations were conducted and validated through different primary and secondary data sources to build the case narrative.

Findings

The results demonstrate how repositioning and rebranding of HR as strategic partner helped in building promoter and line manager buy in of HRM initiatives, build capabilities, controlled employee attrition, increased engagement and productivity, and eventually resulted in improved the financial performance of the company.

Research limitations/implications

The article is based on single organization in India. Hence, generalizability of the study is limited. The description and analysis provide insights about internal HR marketing and navigating the professionalising journey of traditional firms.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners working in the domain of internal HR marketing, employer/HR branding will develop a nuanced understanding of using internal HR marketing as a strategic tool for business realignment. The study also makes readers aware about the dilemmas faced by decision-makers during such transitions.

Originality/value

The study illustrates how internal HR marketing can be successfully deployed in family business environments and adds to both “family business management” “Internal HR Marketing” and “Employer/HR branding” literature.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2018

Jatinder Kumar Jha and Biju Varkkey

Knowledge is considered as a strategic asset for the organizations, especially for knowledge-intensive firms. Research and development (R&D) is a significant unit in…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge is considered as a strategic asset for the organizations, especially for knowledge-intensive firms. Research and development (R&D) is a significant unit in organizations, as it is devoted to knowledge creation and transfer. The success of any R&D project in an organization depends on its innovative value and the transfer of knowledge to the employees. This study aims to focus on factors triggering knowledge-hiding behavior among R&D employees, thus disrupting the knowledge creation in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The grounded theory approach has been used to analyze qualitative data collected from 19 in-depth interviews of R&D professionals (middle and junior level) working in Indian pharmaceutical firms.

Findings

The study identified factors that triggered knowledge-hiding behavior among employees. These factors include distrust, competitive work environment, perceived career insecurity, lack of recognition, lack of reciprocation and lack of confidence in own knowledge. In addition, four hiding strategies used by employees to hide their knowledge from their fellow members were explored and identified: playing innocent, being misleader/evasive hiding, rationalized hiding and counter-questioning.

Research limitations/implications

Besides improving the understanding of knowledge-hiding behavior, particularly in the Indian context, this study has implications for both managerial practices and organizational policies.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the factors influencing knowledge-hiding behavior among R&D employees. Knowledge-hiding construct has not been adequately studied; however, it prevails in the organization and has potential to influence various individual- and organizational-level outcomes. In addition, ways of hiding knowledge used by employees were identified and new forms of strategies named “counter-questioning” were found.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Case study
Publication date: 23 June 2015

Rajesh Chandwani and Biju Varkkey

The case describes the dilemma of Mr Mehta, Regional Head HR of AXZ, a large IT company in India. Mr Mehta had received an appeal from an employee Mr Rajesh Kumar who…

Abstract

The case describes the dilemma of Mr Mehta, Regional Head HR of AXZ, a large IT company in India. Mr Mehta had received an appeal from an employee Mr Rajesh Kumar who alleged that he was wrongly appraised by his manager Mr Yogesh Desai. Both Desai and Kumar have presented their perspectives to Mr Mehta. While Mr Mehta understands Mr Desai's challenges in performance appraisal process, he also is concerned about Rajesh, who is a talented employee with rare skill sets. Apart from the case specific issues related to the two employees, Mr Mehta is also concerned about the problems arising from the current performance appraisal system, especially after AXZ acquired UTVC, which had a very different performance appraisal system. The case also provides an opportunity to discuss the challenges associated with bell curve implementation and discrimination in performance appraisal processes in organizations.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study
Publication date: 20 September 2016

Kirti Sharda, Biju Varkkey and Snehil Basoya

On a fine afternoon in January 2015, Divakar Kaza, President, Human Resources, at Lupin Ltd., took a sip of coffee from his cup, and shared the good news he had just…

Abstract

On a fine afternoon in January 2015, Divakar Kaza, President, Human Resources, at Lupin Ltd., took a sip of coffee from his cup, and shared the good news he had just received, with Rituraj Sar, head of Learning & Development. Lupin had just won the ‘Outstanding Company of the Year’ Award at the CNBC-TV18 India Business Leadership Awards, 2014-151. The accomplishment was heartening, given that it reinforced similar recognitions in the recent past. Lupin had won the NDTV Business Leadership Award for the Indian Pharmaceutical Company of the year in 2012, backed up by the same acclaim in 2010 by Frost & Sullivan2.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study
Publication date: 22 August 2017

Biju Varkkey and Nutan Samdani

Nokia India Pvt Ltd (NIPL) was part of Nokia Corporation, Finland. In March 2013, the Indian Income Tax department accused NIPL of evading taxes amounting to USD 3.5…

Abstract

Nokia India Pvt Ltd (NIPL) was part of Nokia Corporation, Finland. In March 2013, the Indian Income Tax department accused NIPL of evading taxes amounting to USD 3.5 billion. Simultaneously, the market share of Nokia Corporation declined following increased competition from android devices. In September 2013, Nokia announced the sale of its global Devices and Services division to Microsoft Corporation. The Indian IT department freezed the assets of NIPL, disallowing transfer of assets and Microsoft excluded the Chennai plant of NIPL from the deal. In mid-April 2014, NIPL offered Voluntary Retirement Scheme (VRS) to its workers. Despite efforts by trade unions, the plant finally shut operations on November 1, 2014 leaving 30,000 direct and indirect employees jobless. The case discusses the labour relations impact in global manufacturing chains.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study
Publication date: 31 March 2016

Sunil Sharma and Biju Varkkey

The Government of India established Competition Commission of India (CCI hereafter) through an act promulgated in 2002 to shift regulatory focus from curbing monopolies to…

Abstract

The Government of India established Competition Commission of India (CCI hereafter) through an act promulgated in 2002 to shift regulatory focus from curbing monopolies to promoting competition. The organization became fully functional in 2009 and gained recognition for its proactive stance when it slapped a penalty of Rs. 6400 crore on eleven cement companies for anticompetitive behavior. While CCI's proactive stance increased expectations of stakeholders and of the general public at large, it also became apparent that going forward the organization would need enormous resources and a clear identification of priority areas so as to emerge as an effective regulator. With this objective, the organization invited a team of professors from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, India to help them with formulating a vision and mission statement. This case describes the process of creating a new vision and mission statement for a regulatory body.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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