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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Jukka Majava, Harri Haapasalo and Kirsi Aaltonen

The “big room” concept and lean philosophy have become increasingly popular in the construction industry. Visual control is a central part of lean philosophy and the big

Abstract

Purpose

The “big room” concept and lean philosophy have become increasingly popular in the construction industry. Visual control is a central part of lean philosophy and the big room concept; its aim is to improve information flow, joint problem-solving and real-time decision-making. Visual control facilitates effective project management by providing information on what work is performed and why, customer requirements, deadlines, work status and potential problems. This study aims to explore how visualisation supports project management and control in a big room and the factors that facilitate good visual control.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on the case study method, and the objective is to elaborate the current understanding of factors that affect visual control. The study includes a literature review and an empirical study of a large construction project.

Findings

The results indicate that many factors facilitate visual control. Despite the importance of facilities and tools, communication and teamwork are identified as the key factors. On a broader level, the results indicate a need for a holistic approach in developing visual management strategies and practices in the construction industry and in complex projects in particular.

Research limitations/implications

A single case may not be able to offer a generalised picture of this complex topic. However, the study provides novel insights for practitioners and researchers interested in the development of visual control and big rooms. Future research topics are also proposed.

Originality/value

While previous studies have identified many elements of successful big room implementation – including integration and early involvement, information sharing, tools and facilities – this study focusses specifically on the factors that facilitate visual control.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Martin Cathcart Frödén

Abstract

Details

A Circular Argument
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-385-7

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Xun Xu

This study aims to investigate the online customer review behavior and determinants of overall satisfaction with hotels of travelers in various travel group compositions.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the online customer review behavior and determinants of overall satisfaction with hotels of travelers in various travel group compositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The author collected data from online reviews of travelers in various travel group compositions from 600 hotels in 100 of the largest cities in the USA from Booking.com and used latent semantic analysis (LSA) to identify the positive and negative factors from online reviews of travelers in various travel group compositions. Then, text regression was used to determine the influential factors of overall satisfaction of travelers in various travel group compositions.

Findings

It was found in this study that not all the positive and negative textual factors mined from travelers’ online reviews significantly influenced their overall satisfaction. In addition, the determinants of traveler satisfaction were different when travelers were in different travel group compositions.

Research limitations/implications

The author found similar online review behavior, but different basic, excitement and performance factors of travelers in different travel group compositions.

Practical implications

This study helps hoteliers understand customers’ perception of the specific attributes of their products and services, which provides a guideline for businesses to design the priority rule to improve these corresponding attributes and use market segmentation strategy when dealing with customers in different travel group compositions.

Originality/value

The author examined and compared the online review behavior and determinants of satisfaction using the factors mined from online reviews between travelers in various travel group compositions. This study combined customer ratings with textual reviews and predicted customer ratings from the factors extracted from textual reviews using LSA and text regression.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Julia Wijnmaalen, Hans Voordijk and Bas Rietjens

This paper aims to generate insight into the processes that lie at the heart of multiteam system (MTS) coordination and how MTS coordination develops. The four…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to generate insight into the processes that lie at the heart of multiteam system (MTS) coordination and how MTS coordination develops. The four propositions developed can set a future MTS research agenda and enable MTS leaders to increase MTS performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A military and civilian construction MTS has been studied over several months. The longitudinal character, micro-level focus and abductive research approach respond to the call for more in-depth, empirical studies of MTS processes.

Findings

Based on the research findings, four propositions are advanced: the interrelatedness of trust, communication and shared mental models is at the heart of MTS coordination; MTSs are sensitive to a downward spiral triggered by the negative relationship between MTS coordination and the occurrence of negative events; a salient component team identity accelerates this downward spiral; and effective MTS leadership is a perquisite for successful MTS coordination. The findings also indicate that because the MTS research field is still maturing, there is value in testing the degree to which existing knowledge on teams is generalizable to an MTS context.

Practical implications

The research generates three practical suggestions for MTS leaders to increase MTS performance: usual ways of structuring or leading a team might elicit intergroup behavior in MTSs, a conventional “fun” teambuilding program is not effective in an MTS situation and balance formal and informal coordination.

Originality/value

The abductive and empirical character of this study is unique in the field of MTS research. Moreover, the four propositions on MTS coordination advance current knowledge on MTS processes. Additionally, the study generates new insights that could enable MTS leaders to increase MTS performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Leena Aalto, Pia Sirola, Tiina Kalliomäki-Levanto, Marjaana Lahtinen, Virpi Ruohomäki, Heidi Salonen and Kari Reijula

The challenges arising from the reform of the social and healthcare sector call for efficient, effective and novel processes in both public and private health and medical…

Abstract

Purpose

The challenges arising from the reform of the social and healthcare sector call for efficient, effective and novel processes in both public and private health and medical care. Facilities need to be designed to suit the new processes and to offer usable workspaces at different levels of healthcare services. Along with traditional construction, modular facility innovations could be one solution to these pressures. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study analyzed the different usability characteristics of the work environment in modular and non-modular healthcare facilities (HCFs). The qualitative research method was based on semi-structured interviews of employees and observations of the case buildings.

Findings

According to the results, the usability characteristics were divided into four main categories: functionality, healthiness, safety/security and comfort. The main differences between the modular and non-modular facilities appeared to be room size, soundproofing, safety issues and the utilization of colors and artwork, which were all perceived as better realized in the non-modular facilities. The staff highlighted functionality as the most important characteristic in their work environment. They even considered functionality as a feature of a comfortable work environment.

Originality/value

This paper presents new knowledge and a detailed description of the opinions and experiences of healthcare professionals concerning a user-centric, usable environment in the context of modular and non-modular HCFs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Presents three prize‐winning and five short‐listed entries in theJohn Smith & Sons (Glasgow) Ltd/Paisley College Library ScottishSchools Essay Competition. Offers…

Abstract

Presents three prize‐winning and five short‐listed entries in the John Smith & Sons (Glasgow) Ltd/Paisley College Library Scottish Schools Essay Competition. Offers imaginative ideas or reasoned views of what books and libraries might be like in the next century.

Details

Library Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2016

Luca Daconto and Gabriele Manella

The chapter addresses the issue of contemporary public space. In the urban setting, social groups form different publics that become mutually inter-visible in public…

Abstract

The chapter addresses the issue of contemporary public space. In the urban setting, social groups form different publics that become mutually inter-visible in public spaces: relational arenas, in which it is possible to learn living with strangers, recognizing the right to the city for all people. In contemporary city, some theories argue that we would assist to the crisis of public space. Indeed, the forming of a public realm is more difficult, because social groups build separate and self-segregating routes, and urban public spaces are increasingly privatized, controlled, and reorganized to be more compatible with the global city, the city-users, and the hypermobile upper classes.

Shifting the attention to Sala Borsa (a public library in the centre of Bologna), the authors argue that the changes in the socio-spatial morphology of contemporary cities do not prevent the forming of a public arena, accessible also to the marginal groups, as the homeless. Because of its centrality, its free access, its innovative and multimedia environment, Sala Borsa is a crowded, lively, and symbolic public space. In this public library, social groups appropriate different spaces and times through the production of porous boundaries. Nevertheless, the identity of public-library-user taken once in Sala Borsa produces an inclusive regime of inter-visibility, where also homeless people are present.

Details

Public Spaces: Times of Crisis and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-463-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1967

WORDS, the currency of human thought, are easily debased. Frequent repetition can empty them of serious meaning. Rightly used they can, with the brevity and directness of…

Abstract

WORDS, the currency of human thought, are easily debased. Frequent repetition can empty them of serious meaning. Rightly used they can, with the brevity and directness of a road sign, provide the pith of a subject. Only when they are widely adopted and used as a label to stick on every package do they lose significance.

Details

Work Study, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Sarah Meylan

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Hannele Kerosuo, Tarja Mäki and Jenni Korpela

This paper aims to study the visibilization of learning in the context of developing a new collaborative practice, knotworking, in building design. The case under study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the visibilization of learning in the context of developing a new collaborative practice, knotworking, in building design. The case under study describes the process of learning from the initiation of knotworking to its experimentation. The implementation of new building information modeling tools acted as an impetus for this development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on activity-theoretically oriented ethnographic research. The four analytical steps created by Engeström (1999) for analyzing the expansive visibilization of learning are applied in the analysis.

Findings

The envisioning of the idea of knotworking involved the first and the second steps of visibilization. First, a flowchart made the ideal process of design visible and triggered a discussion on the problems and requirements emerging in the project members’ work. Second, an idea for a new type of collaboration was introduced as a solution to these problems and requirements. Planning the knotworking experiment and explicating the associated design instruments involved the third step of expansive visibilization. The fourth step of visibilization took place during the experiment of knotworking in a design project.

Practical implications

Two other knotworking projects have already been conducted, and plans have been made to commercialize knotworking in building design. New technical tools have been developed for energy calculation and the comparison of alternative design requirements.

Social implications

Knotworking can improve the collaboration between designers with positive implications on the quality of a building design process.

Originality/value

Development and learning are studied as a longitudinal process in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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