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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Farita Tasnim, Atieh Sadraei, Bianca Datta, Mina Khan, Kyung Yun Choi, Atharva Sahasrabudhe, Tomás Alfonso Vega Gálvez, Irmandy Wicaksono, Oscar Rosello, Carlos Nunez-Lopez and Canan Dagdeviren

When wearable and implantable devices first arose in the 1970s, they were rigid and clashed dramatically with our soft, pliable skin and organs. The past two decades have…

Abstract

Purpose

When wearable and implantable devices first arose in the 1970s, they were rigid and clashed dramatically with our soft, pliable skin and organs. The past two decades have witnessed a major upheaval in these devices. Traditional electronics are six orders of magnitude stiffer than soft tissue. As a result, when rigid electronics are integrated with the human body, severe challenges in both mechanical and geometrical form mismatch occur. This mismatch creates an uneven contact at the interface of soft-tissue, leading to noisy and unreliable data gathering of the body’s vital signs. This paper aims to predict the role that discreet, seamless medical devices will play in personalized health care by discussing novel solutions for alleviating this interface mismatch and exploring the challenges in developing and commercializing such devices.

Design methodology/approach

Since the form factors of biology cannot be changed to match those of rigid devices, conformable devices that mimic the shape and mechanical properties of soft body tissue must be designed and fabricated. These conformable devices play the role of imperceptible medical interfaces. Such interfaces can help scientists and medical practitioners to gain further insights into the body by providing an accurate and reliable instrument that can conform closely to the target areas of interest for continuous, long-term monitoring of the human body, while improving user experience.

Findings

The authors have highlighted current attempts of mechanically adaptive devices for health care, and the authors forecast key aspects for the future of these conformable biomedical devices and the ways in which these devices will revolutionize how health care is administered or obtained.

Originality/value

The authors conclude this paper with the perspective on the challenges of implementing this technology for practical use, including device packaging, environmental life cycle, data privacy, industry partnership and collaboration.

Details

foresight, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2023

Bianca Maria van Niekerk, Mornay Roberts-Lombard and Nicole Cunningham

This study aims to explore the impact of store atmospherics on urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers’ behavioural intentions to purchase apparel in an emerging African market…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the impact of store atmospherics on urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers’ behavioural intentions to purchase apparel in an emerging African market context. This study also considers purchase antecedents to attitude, perceived behavioural control and social norms as determinants of urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers’ apparel behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using non-probability sampling, specifically purposive and interlocking sampling, data collection was secured from 881 economically active Namibian urban bottom-of-the-pyramid respondents through interviewer-administered questionnaires. Covariance-based structural equation modelling assessed the significant relationships among all constructs in the conceptual model.

Findings

This study found that for favourable apparel behavioural intentions of urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers to occur, apparel retailers should emphasise trust, perceived awareness and self-identity through apparel assortment and groupings, easy-to-read visible signage, together with competent, friendly and respectful sales personnel in their store atmospherics.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may guide apparel retailers in other emerging African markets to develop regional integration, market-based solutions and inclusive economic growth focusing on “non-essential” products, such as apparel, among urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers.

Originality/value

This study expands the intellectual boundaries of urban bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers’ behavioural intentions towards “non-essential” products. The theoretical framework supports the integration of both the stimulus-organism-response model and the theory of planned behaviour into one single model for empirical investigation. Additionally, adopting a novel theoretical framework helped identify the impact of store atmospherics from a bottom-of-the-pyramid perspective in an emerging African market context, such as Namibia.

Details

European Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Afonso C.C Lemonge, Helio J.C. Barbosa and Heder S. Bernardino

– The purpose of this paper is to propose variants of an adaptive penalty scheme for steady-state genetic algorithms applied to constrained engineering optimization problems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose variants of an adaptive penalty scheme for steady-state genetic algorithms applied to constrained engineering optimization problems.

Design/methodology/approach

For each constraint a penalty parameter is adaptively computed along the evolution according to information extracted from the current population such as the existence of feasible individuals and the level of violation of each constraint. The adaptive penalty method (APM), as originally proposed, computes the constraint violations of the initial population, and updates the penalty coefficient of each constraint after a given number of new individuals are inserted in the population. A second variant, called sporadic APM with constraint violation accumulation, works by accumulating the constraint violations during a given insertion of new offspring into the population, updating the penalty coefficients, and fixing the penalty coefficients for the next generations. The APM with monotonic penalty coefficients is the third variation, where the penalty coefficients are calculated as in the original method, but no penalty coefficient is allowed to have its value reduced along the evolutionary process. Finally, the penalty coefficients are defined by using a weighted average between the current value of a coefficient and the new value predicted by the method. This variant is called the APM with damping.

Findings

The paper checks new variants of an APM for evolutionary algorithms; variants of an APM, for a steady-state genetic algorithm based on an APM for a generational genetic algorithm, largely used in the literature previously proposed by two co-authors of this manuscript; good performance of the proposed APM in comparison with other techniques found in the literature; innovative and general strategies to handle constraints in the field of evolutionary computation.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed algorithm has no limitations and can be applied in a large number of evolutionary algorithms used to solve constrained optimization problems.

Practical implications

The proposed algorithm can be used to solve real world problems in engineering as can be viewed in the references, presented in this manuscript, that use the original (APM) strategy. The performance of these variants is examined using benchmark problems of mechanical and structural engineering frequently discussed in the literature.

Originality/value

It is the first extended analysis of the variants of the APM submitted for possible publication in the literature, applied to real world engineering optimization problems.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Arne De Keyser, Sarah Köcher, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Cédric Verbeeck and Jay Kandampully

Smart technologies and connected objects are rapidly changing the organizational frontline. Yet, our understanding of how these technologies infuse service encounters remains…

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Abstract

Purpose

Smart technologies and connected objects are rapidly changing the organizational frontline. Yet, our understanding of how these technologies infuse service encounters remains limited. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to update existing classifications of Frontline Service Technology (FST) infusion. Moreover, the authors discuss three promising smart and connected technologies – conversational agents, extended reality (XR) and blockchain technology – and their respective implications for customers, frontline employees and service organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a conceptual approach integrating existing work on FST infusion with artificial intelligence, robotics, XR and blockchain literature, while also building on insights gathered through expert interviews and focus group conversations with members of two service research centers.

Findings

The authors define FST and propose a set of FST infusion archetypes at the organizational frontline. Additionally, the authors develop future research directions focused on understanding how conversational agents, XR and blockchain technology will impact service.

Originality/value

This paper updates and extends existing classifications of FST, while paving the road for further work on FST infusion.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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