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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Beverly Pasian and Nigel Williams

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735

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International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Beverly Pasian

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these…

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1370

Abstract

Purpose

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these boundaries to reveal non-process factors. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multimethod research design was used with a “qual⇒Qual” sequence. This is a development in MM design theory, with its reliance on an initial qualitative stage that, despite being first, is insufficient to collecting sufficient data to answer the research question. A second stage, involving a more dominant qualitative, is necessary.

Findings

Multiple non-process factors are attributed to a mature project management capability responsible for undefined projects. They include “human factors” such as trust, attitude, motivation and attitude, along with increased customer involvement and a more adaptable organizational environment.

Research limitations/implications

The challenge put forward in this research was for project management maturity theorists to recognize the possibility of finding maturity in a project management capability responsible for undefined projects. This challenge has been met. The focus can now turn to other environments where other project types (undefined or not) are also being managed using processes (and/or practices) that are not necessarily definable, repeatable, predictable and unique to that setting.

Originality/value

An adaptable model has been created that contains multiple factors that can be used in their current relationships or changed to accommodate multiple project and project management scenarios. Further work will create weights for each factor that will further specify the relative value of each, thereby enhancing the adaptable nature of the model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Beverly Pasian, Shankar Sankaran and Spike Boydell

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a doctoral thesis examining the limitations of project management maturity and associated models. It examines the…

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2937

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a doctoral thesis examining the limitations of project management maturity and associated models. It examines the management of undefined projects where the definition, repeatability and predictability of processes cannot be reasonably expected. The challenge to project management maturity theorists is to recognize the possibility of project management maturity in an environment characterized by undefined project elements and the requirement for greater flexibility in their management.

Design/methodology/approach

This inquiry was supported by a multimethod (MXM) research design with two stages: a content/textual analysis of two different collections of maturity models, and an exploratory case study of two university sites. The analysis (supported by grounded theory techniques) contributed to the development of a 4‐node conceptual framework that was used as the primary data collection instrument at two Canadian university sites.

Findings

Results indicate that multiple non‐process factors can contribute to a mature project management capability. These can include context‐specific values, specialized bodies of knowledge (instructional design), customer involvement, third‐party influence, and tacit “human factors” such as trust and creativity. The demands of this inquiry also demonstrated the need for a new data collection sequence in multimethod research design theory.

Practical implications

Practitioners are encouraged to consider customer involvement, organizational dynamics and adaptable variables such as leadership (among other non‐process factors) in their assessment of the maturity of their project management capability, and designers of future models could explore a multi‐dimensional approach that includes context‐specific factors to assessing and defining project management maturity.

Originality/value

This research expands the conceptual view and practical assessment of project management maturity; offers new analysis of the current generation of project management maturity models; documents e‐Learning project management; and defines a new data collection sequencing model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

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379

Abstract

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International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Nigel Williams, Nicole P. Ferdinand and Robin Croft

While the area of project management maturity (PMM) is attracting an increased amount of research attention, the approaches to measuring maturity fit within existing…

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2565

Abstract

Purpose

While the area of project management maturity (PMM) is attracting an increased amount of research attention, the approaches to measuring maturity fit within existing social science conventions. This paper aims to examine the potential contribution of new data collection and analytical approaches to develop new insights in PMM.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

The current trends of rapidly growing digital data collection and storage may have the potential to develop approaches to PMM assessment that overcome the limitations of existing qualitative and quantitative approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Future research in PMM can employ techniques such as social network analysis and text analysis to develop insights based on the flow and content of information in organizations.

Practical implications

Adoption of data analytical approaches from big data can enable the creation of new types of holistic and adaptive maturity models. Holistic maturity models provide insights based on both structured and unstructured data within organizations. Adaptive maturity models provide rapid insights based on the flow of information within an enterprise.

Originality/value

The recent trend towards digitising of organizational knowledge and interactions has created the possibility to apply new analytical approaches and techniques to the understanding of PMM in firms. This paper identifies possible tools and approaches that can be applied to create new types of maturity models based on structured and unstructured data.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Jan Christoph Albrecht and Konrad Spang

The purpose of the research presented in this article is to identify potential influences on an organization-specific “ideal” level of project management maturity by…

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4939

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research presented in this article is to identify potential influences on an organization-specific “ideal” level of project management maturity by adopting a qualitative, exploratory approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the results of a multiple qualitative case study, which has been conducted within industrial enterprises from automotive industry and energy sector, are presented. The research methods applied within the case research are qualitative guided interview, document analysis and standardized interview (maturity questionnaire).

Findings

The interview data reveal that the complexity of the companies' projects might be a determining factor regarding the “ideal” level of maturity. A comparison of the findings of the case research with a secondary literature review on project complexity showed that particularly those facets of project complexity that affect the interaction of the project participants (project team, client, suppliers) seem to require a certain level of maturity.

Originality/value

The idea of an organization-specific “ideal” level of maturity was raised by the developers of project management maturity models (PMMM). It is of interest for professionals due to efficiency reasons. Research literature in the context of PMMM has so far touched on environmental/circumstantial influences on this ideal maturity level only to a slight degree. The results of the qualitative research presented herein mark a contribution to this research gap and allow for quantitative testing.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sergey D. Bushuyev and Reinhard Friedrich Wagner

The purpose of this paper is to describe the concepts of two new approaches offered by IPMA through its internationally widespread member associations: IPMA Delta® for…

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1672

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the concepts of two new approaches offered by IPMA through its internationally widespread member associations: IPMA Delta® for assessing and developing project management maturity and the IPMA Organisational Competence Baseline (OCB), acting as reference model for IPMA Delta. In addition to this description, a case study reveals insights in the usage of IPMA Delta and the benefits realized through such a holistic assessment of project management maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a conceptual paper and a case study.

Findings

IPMA Delta is a holistic assessment of the organisational competence in managing projects. Three modules are used to assess the competence of selected individuals, the application of project management in selected projects and the organisation's approach of managing projects. Through the assessment, an organisation gets insights in regard to the current maturity and the Delta to a desired target state. Recommendations drive the continuous development of organisational competences in managing projects, which is shown in the case of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. This case study also reveals insights in the benefits realized through such a holistic maturity assessment.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper builds on organisational competence in managing projects, a new concept in the world of maturity models offering a holistic view beyond processes.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Derek H.T. Walker

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179

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Mark Mullaly

Maturity models have been widely adopted as a popular framework for improvement project management practices. Despite their prevalence, there is still minimal evidence…

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1831

Abstract

Purpose

Maturity models have been widely adopted as a popular framework for improvement project management practices. Despite their prevalence, there is still minimal evidence that improvements in maturity correspond to improvements in performance or value. This paper aims to explore the challenges faced in applying project management maturity models and offers suggestions for their revision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper highlights the presumptions in their development and use that are inhibiting relevance of maturity models. Case studies from a major research project explore the relationship between maturity and value. Insights are generated on how project management maturity models need to change in order to become relevant.

Findings

Project management maturity models presume that project management is universal, control oriented and consistent, and that maturity is a linear process. Empirical evidence demonstrates that the practice of project management varies, that different practices result in different value. The paper suggests that a contingent and contextual approach to assessment is required, which maturity models as currently defined may not be able to support.

Research limitations/implications

This is a largely conceptual paper and draws on a limited number of case studies that derived maturity from a comprehensive understanding of project management practices. It is not tied to one specific model, and a model that would address the criticisms discussed here has not been conceived or developed.

Practical implications

This paper will have particular relevance for organizations, who may place excess faith in the rhetoric surrounding maturity models without questioning their underlying relevance or value. It is also of importance to those who develop maturity models and suggests strategies for their significant revision.

Originality/value

This paper takes an important look at whether maturity models actually deliver on their promise and argues that by both design and structure, they are unlikely to do so in their current form.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Naomi Brookes, Michael Butler, Prasanta Dey and Robin Clark

– The purpose of the paper was to conduct an empirical investigation to explore the impact of project management maturity models (PMMMs) on improving project performance.

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3413

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper was to conduct an empirical investigation to explore the impact of project management maturity models (PMMMs) on improving project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation used a cross-case analysis involving over 90 individuals in seven organisations.

Findings

The findings of the empirical investigation indicate that PMMMs demonstrate very high levels of variability in individual's assessment of project management maturity. Furthermore, at higher levels of maturity, the type of performance improvement adopted following their application is related to the type of PMMM used in the assessment. The paradox of the unreliability of PMMMs and their widespread acceptance is resolved by calling upon the “wisdom of crowds” phenomenon which has implications for the use of maturity model assessments in other arena.

Research limitations/implications

The investigation does have the usual issues associated with case research, but the steps that have been taken in the cross-case construction and analysis have improved the overall robustness and extendibility of the findings.

Practical implications

The tendency for PMMMs to shape improvements based on their own inherent structure needs further understanding.

Originality/value

The use of empirical methods to investigate the link between project maturity models and extant changes in project management performance is highly novel and the findings that result from this have added resonance.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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