Search results

1 – 10 of 74
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Karin Weber, Graham L. Bradley and Beverley Sparks

Owners, managers and employees may be criticized personally and professionally by consumers in online reviews, and may suffer emotional and burnout consequences. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Owners, managers and employees may be criticized personally and professionally by consumers in online reviews, and may suffer emotional and burnout consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of customer-generated negative online reviews on hospitality employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This research analyzed the effects of traditional face-to-face customer-related social stressors, as well as a newly added negative online review (NOR) stressor, on anger and burnout in a sample of 418 US hospitality workers.

Findings

Structural equation modeling revealed that, after taking into account the contribution of customer-related social stressors, receipt of NORs predicts anger and anger mediates the relationships between NOR-receipt and two indices of burnout.

Practical implications

This research extends our understanding of social stressors that apply to workers in the hospitality industry. It offers strategies for managing the threats and optimizing the opportunities, provided by negative online reviews.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies that provide evidence of the personal impact of NORs on hospitality industry employees, thereby extending our understanding of social stressors that apply to workers in this industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Karin Weber, Beverley Sparks and Cathy H.C. Hsu

This study aims to analyze the joint effects of where a service failure occurs and who witnesses it, with a specific focus on Chinese consumers who have varying levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the joint effects of where a service failure occurs and who witnesses it, with a specific focus on Chinese consumers who have varying levels of acculturation.

Design/methodology/approach

A 4 × 2 × 2 between-subject factorial design was used, where social presence and the location of the service failure were manipulated and acculturation was measured. Data were collected in Australia and China to contrast perceptions and behavioral responses of Chinese – Australians and Mainland Chinese by drawing on samples of 224 and 264 respondents, respectively.

Findings

Results showed significant differences in face, satisfaction and repeat purchase intention ratings following a service failure between Chinese – Australians and Mainland Chinese, as well as among Chinese – Australians with different acculturation strategies. Contrary to expectations, results established that where and with whom a service failure is experienced prominently affect consumer behavior regardless of the acculturation level.

Practical implications

An understanding of the effect of acculturation on a service failure situation is crucial for businesses to successfully compete in a continuously globalized world where migration produces multicultural societies and short-term travel tends to significantly change demands on service provision.

Originality/value

This research presents one of the first studies that go beyond the traditional East/West consumer distinction in studying service failure. This study analyzes the effect of acculturation by itself and together with other variables of interest.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Wei Liu, Beverley Sparks and Alexandra Coghlan

This paper aims to use a concurrent mixed method approach to explore the key variables that can influence customer experience at a food and wine event.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use a concurrent mixed method approach to explore the key variables that can influence customer experience at a food and wine event.

Design/methodology/approach

A concurrent mixed methods approach, using a participant-generated image (PGI) method, together with a recall survey, provided images with associated narratives, descriptive statistics, correlations and hierarchical multiple regression analysis to explore how attendees appraise their experiences based on their goals and the link between experience appraisals and overall evaluations.

Findings

Through the PGI method (N = 25), the authors determined that customer experience at the event could be viewed as a hierarchical model, comprising a fundamental sensory experience together with three higher-order customer experience components (fun, discovery and inspiration). A separate concurrent recall study (N = 598) demonstrated the relationship between the same four customer experience components and overall satisfaction as well as recommendation and repeat visitation.

Practical implications

The results suggest that to promote positive customer experiences, along with the product of the event itself, event managers should focus on activity programs that are fun, inspirational and novel, as well as sensory.

Originality/value

This study focuses on a single case study of an event to examine and extend our understanding of customer experience. The use of a concurrent mixed methods approach provides us with different types of data from two separate samples of participants. By integrating data from each study the authors are able to build a conceptual model of the salient dimensions of customer experience and then quantitatively analyze how these salient dimensions are related to outcome variables.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Beverley Sparks

Guest history is a valuable service and marketing tool. Inparticular, it is likely to become a strategic device for thedevelopment of brand loyalty in the 1990s. Reports…

Abstract

Guest history is a valuable service and marketing tool. In particular, it is likely to become a strategic device for the development of brand loyalty in the 1990s. Reports on a nationwide Australian study of 121 hotels′ use of guest history, and describes some of the key opportunities for optimizing the guest history function. The findings suggest that while guest history is being widely utilized by hotels, the extent of that utilization is limited. Three major areas for developing strategies to optimize the guest history function were found to include: specific guest history training modules; an internal service orientation emphasizing the organization‐wide usage of guest history to service the customer better; and further enhancement of the use of guest history for increasing brand loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Graham L. Bradley, Janet R. McColl-Kennedy, Beverley A. Sparks, Nerina L. Jimmieson and Dieter Zapf

Interactions between customers and service providers are ubiquitous. Some of these encounters are routine, but many are characterized by conflict and intense emotions…

Abstract

Interactions between customers and service providers are ubiquitous. Some of these encounters are routine, but many are characterized by conflict and intense emotions. This chapter introduces a new theory, service encounter needs theory (SENT) that aims to elucidate the mechanisms through which service encounter behaviors affect outcomes for customers and employees. Evidence is presented for the preeminence within these encounters of eight psychosocial needs, and propositions are advanced regarding likely antecedents to fulfillment and violation of these needs. Emotional experiences and displays are viewed as important consequences of need fulfillment and violation, as are numerous cognitive, behavioral, and health-related outcomes.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Dynamism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-177-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Graham L. Bradley, Beverley A. Sparks and Karin Weber

The paper aims to examine the impact of customer-generated negative online reviews on hospitality employees and businesses. It introduces the concept of negative online…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the impact of customer-generated negative online reviews on hospitality employees and businesses. It introduces the concept of negative online review stress, or NOR_Stress (occupational stress due to being targeted by negative online reviews), and present strategies for researching and managing the impact of negative online reviews.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper sets forth a framework, based on the stress, services and hospitality literature, within which negative online reviews, NOR_Stress, and their impact on individuals and businesses can be understood. Aspects of the framework are illustrated by application of online archival material.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how negative online reviews can have adverse and diverse effects on restaurant industry employees and businesses.

Research limitations/implications

The paper sets out a research agenda relating to negative online reviews and NOR_Stress causes, consequences and countermeasures. Multiple research questions are posed, to be investigated through a combination of qualitative, survey and experimental methods.

Practical implications

Four types of countermeasures are presented: preventative, protective, positive and palliative.

Social implications

Negative online reviews can exact a hefty toll, potentially resulting not only in reduced customer patronage and company profitability but also in human and social consequences in the form of adverse stress reactions, loss of face and damaged personal and professional relationships.

Originality/value

Negative online reviews have proliferated over the past decade and will continue to grow. This paper is the first to critically examine the human and business impacts of this growing threat to the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Graham Bradley and Beverley Sparks

This study aims to investigate if, when, and how the use of four different types of explanations affect customer satisfaction after a service failure.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate if, when, and how the use of four different types of explanations affect customer satisfaction after a service failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used written scenarios of a hypothetical service failure to manipulate explanation type, failure magnitude and compensation offered. Participants were randomly assigned to read and respond to one version of the scenario, whilst imagining they were the customer experiencing the service failure.

Findings

The paper finds that explanation type, explanation quality, failure magnitude and compensation each had significant effects on customer evaluations. Explanation type and explanation quality interactively affected the extent to which customers were satisfied with service recovery: Apologies and excuses yielded higher satisfaction levels than did justifications and referential accounts but only when the explanations were perceived to be of high (vs low) quality. Specific types of attributions and forms of justice were shown to mediate the effects of three of the explanation types.

Practical implications

The study shows that customer evaluations following service failure vary with the type of explanation provided. Service firms need to provide an explanation in such circumstances, preferably a high quality excuse or apology, and need to understand the “process variables” that determine whether the explanation will satisfy aggrieved customers.

Originality/value

This is one of very few studies that have compared the efficacy of different types of explanations in service situations. The research sheds light not only on what types of explanations work best, but also on how they have their effect.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Beverley Sparks, John Bowen and Stefanie Klag

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants…

Abstract

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants at a destination can enhance the guests’ overall satisfaction with the destination. This research was sponsored by the Co‐operative Research Centre for Sustainable Tourism in Australia and investigates the relationship between the tourist destination, restaurants and tourists. The study is based on the results of interviews with 459 tourists. The findings of the study provide support for the proposition that tourists perceive restaurants as an important attribute of a tourist destination. The study also provides insight into how tourists select restaurants. This information is useful to managers of restaurants in tourist destinations. Both destination marketers and restaurant managers will benefit from this study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2016

Kevin Kam Fung So, Ceridwyn King, Beverley Ann Sparks and Ying Wang

The concept of customer engagement has emerged as an important indicator of customer- brand relationship strength. However, limited research exists to provide insight into…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of customer engagement has emerged as an important indicator of customer- brand relationship strength. However, limited research exists to provide insight into how customer engagement enhances the effectiveness of building such a relationship in retail services. This study extends the current understanding of customer engagement through examination of its role in the development of customer-brand relationship quality.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses contained in the proposed conceptual model, we used a quantitative method that included a survey questionnaire to measure customers’ perceptions with respect to the constructs of interest. Specifically, two studies were conducted in Australia. Study 1 was intended to empirically test the theoretical relationships among the constructs, while Study 2 aimed to replicate the proposed model with a different sample to enhance external validity.

Findings

In two separate studies, the results of a structural model show that the emerging concept of customer engagement plays a significant role in building customer-brand relationship quality and, subsequently, customer loyalty toward the retail brand.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on retail store brands only and used a cross-sectional design, which does not involve examination of cause and effect relationships.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, the findings suggest that marketers should actively embrace strategies to foster customer engagement to enhance brand relationship quality, and ultimately, forming a loyal customer-brand relationship.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the retail services literature by empirically demonstrating the relevance of customer engagement in both customer relationship management as well as brand management.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Graham L. Bradley, Beverley A. Sparks and Karin Weber

Technological advancement and growth in social media have meant that customers are increasingly using the internet to write a review or express opinions about products and…

Abstract

Purpose

Technological advancement and growth in social media have meant that customers are increasingly using the internet to write a review or express opinions about products and services. Many of these online reviews are critical of service organizations and workers. The purpose of this paper is to document the experiences that service industry personnel have of negatively valenced, customer-authored, online reviews, the personal impact of these reviews, and the manner in which participants respond emotionally and behaviorally to these reviews.

Design/methodology/approach

This research drew on the stress, coping, and service literature, with particular emphasis on stress appraisal theory. The study involved the completion of an anonymous online questionnaire by 421 restaurant owners, managers, and employees.

Findings

Many respondents reported feelings of anger and use of maladaptive coping strategies in response to negative online reviews (NORs). Smaller numbers reported feelings of embarrassment and guilt, and thoughts of leaving the industry. Factors pertaining to respondents’ online review exposure, emotional responses, and coping strategies predicted the effects of negative reviews on thoughts of exiting current employment.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have implications for protecting worker well-being and job tenure in an industry deeply affected by electronic word-of-mouth. Replication is recommended using a longitudinal design and more objective data obtained from validated instruments and independent sources.

Originality/value

This survey provides the first known evidence of the personal impact of NORs on business owners, managers, and employees.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

1 – 10 of 74