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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Paul Iles

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and…

Abstract

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and focus on the assessment centre as a potentially useful technique in this respect, especially for managerial selection. I go on to examine the assessment centre in more detail, including its origins, construction and uses, before discussing the strong evidence for its validity as a selection and assessment procedure. I then describe some recent British innovations in assessment centre design and practice, especially in its use for management and organisation development purposes, before discussing some of my own recent research, in collaboration with Ivan Robertson and Usha Rout, on participants' attitudes towards the use of assessment centres for selection and development purposes, including gender differences in attitudes.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Gavin Dick and Beverley Metcalfe

The purpose of this paper is to establish empirically whether there is any foundation in the premise that female officers' lesser tenure and/or lower levels of commitment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish empirically whether there is any foundation in the premise that female officers' lesser tenure and/or lower levels of commitment than men explain their lack of career progress. Although the number of women in UK police forces has grown rapidly, it appears that they continue to be under‐represented in senior ranks.

Design/methodology/approach

Using whole population surveys of two county police forces in the UK the paper compares the promotion of men and women police officers controlling for tenure. The paper then compares the organisational commitment of male and female officers and analyses whether female officers experience managerial and organisational influences that undermine their organisational commitment compared to men.

Findings

The findings refute some of the widespread beliefs about reasons for female officers' lack of progress in their policing careers since the analysis indicates that gender differences in length of tenure and organisational commitment can be discounted as possible explanations for lack of advancement in these two police forces. Overall, the results clearly show that female officers are just as committed as male officers and thus cannot be justified as a reason for lack of career progression.

Research limitations/implications

It is accepted that survey methods such as ours do not capture the entirety of employee feelings and responses since they tend to homogenise male and female working experiences. However, survey methods do have the advantage that it is possible to generalise from the results and thus these two studies allow us to suggest that our findings can be viewed as providing insights to other UK police forces.

Practical implications

The relatively low levels of organisational commitment found should be a cause for concern for senior managers in the Police. The key importance that management has in influencing organisational commitment has been shown by our findings and this indicates the importance of the current Police Leadership Development Board's agenda to improve workforce management skills to encourage transformational leadership styles.

Originality/value

The paper make an original contribution by refuting widely held assumptions about the reasons for under‐representation of female officers in senior ranks. It also contributes to the sparse literature that examines organisational commitment in the police and its antecedents.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Christopher J. Rees and Beverley Metcalfe

Explores the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results in occupational settings. Identifies three specific lines of research into faking‐good: first, whether it is…

Abstract

Explores the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results in occupational settings. Identifies three specific lines of research into faking‐good: first, whether it is possible for candidates to fake‐good personality questionnaire results; second, whether faking‐good adversely affects the criterion validity of personality questionnaire results; third, whether candidates actually engage in faking‐good behaviour. Notes, in relation to this third line of enquiry, the lack of information about the views of candidates and potential users of personality questionnaires towards the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results. Proceeds to explore the views of 190 people employed in personnel departments in the North‐West of England towards various issues associated with the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results. These issues include: the ease with which personality questionnaire results can be faked; the ease with which faking‐good can be detected; the extent to which candidates actually fake‐good; the ethics of faking‐good responding. The implications of the study focus on matters such as the face validity of personality questionnaires, the training of test users and the future development of non‐transparent fake‐good scales.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Christopher J. Rees, Jane Järvalt and Beverley Metcalfe

To explore, through a case study, some of the key career‐related HRD issues that senior managers are currently facing in the Estonian civil service.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore, through a case study, some of the key career‐related HRD issues that senior managers are currently facing in the Estonian civil service.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents primary empirical research into career management in the Estonian civil service since 1991, that is, in the post‐Soviet era. The research involved in‐depth interviews with a group of 12 senior staff employed by the Estonian civil service.

Findings

The interview data reveal the ways in which downsizing and de‐layering in the Estonian public sector have led to shortened career paths, increased functional flexibility, increased spans of control and shifts towards open job systems.

Research limitations/implications

The research explored career‐related issues solely within the Estonian civil service. Further research would be needed in a wider range of organisations and countries before the transferability of the findings could be established to transitional economies more generally.

Practical implications

Provides practical insights into the difficulties of career management in transitional economies situations from an HR perspective.

Originality/value

Offers a valuable contribution by demonstrating that, within certain parameters, Western‐based career management strategies and techniques may be adapted to fit transitional public services in Estonia but only as one element of a comprehensive HR modernisation programme.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Stephen Linstead, Joanna Brewis and Alison Linstead

To provide a critical review of existing contributions to gender and change management and in doing so highlight how organizational change needs to be read more readily…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a critical review of existing contributions to gender and change management and in doing so highlight how organizational change needs to be read more readily from a gendered perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper argues that gender has received little attention regarding the change management side of managerial practice and reviews recent contributions to gender and change to demonstrate this. The paper then questions how men and women both cope with and drive change and whether the identified differences are more than superficial. The concept of gender is then read into management theory in order to understand how gender affects the way managers think and act, and the gendering of management is discussed. The paper concludes by outlining future research areas – change agents, entrepreneurs, female innovators, psychoanalytic treatments of change and gender experiences.

Findings

The paper finds that traditional and dominant conceptions of masculine and feminine values that rely on static conceptions of gender to argue that more attention to be paid to the dynamic and the genderful approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes by outlining future research areas – change agents, entrepreneurs, female innovators, psychoanalytic treatments of change and gender experiences.

Practical implications

Draws much needed attention to the neglect of gender in change theory and practice and suggests some ways forward.

Originality/value

Offers a unique introduction to an important but complex literature that needs to be integrated into change management practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

James Werbel

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2008

Kerry Wilson and Sheila Corrall

The paper's aim is to present findings of the recent evaluation of the Leading Modern Public Libraries development programme with reference to the management versus…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to present findings of the recent evaluation of the Leading Modern Public Libraries development programme with reference to the management versus leadership dynamic. The programme provided a strategic intervention to address a perceived weakness in leadership development within the public library sector in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on recent examples from the literature, the theoretical differences between the concepts of management and leadership are discussed and used to inform consideration of the programme's effectiveness. Evaluation methods included participant observation, interviews, focus groups and a questionnaire survey, each administered at various stages of the programme with a representative sample of programme participants. Verbatim quotations from evaluation respondents are included in the analysis.

Findings

The research reveals that the programme has had a positive impact in enabling and developing leadership capacity within the sector, particularly in terms of developing participants' confidence and other interpersonal traits associated with effective leadership, including creativity and risk taking. Perceived benefits and limitations of the public library context in which the course was delivered have also been identified.

Practical implications

Important considerations on the transition from effective management to leadership, and the identification, support and development of future leaders within organisations are presented, with implications for current public library leaders, trainers and facilitators within the field.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the programme and its evaluation represent a strategic development initiative on an unprecedented scale in the public library sector.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Alison Pullen, Jenny Helin and Nancy Harding

Abstract

Details

Writing Differently
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-337-6

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