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Article

Beverley Costa and Stephen Briggs

Working across languages is playing an increasingly important role in the delivery of mental health services, notably through psychotherapy and psychological therapies…

Abstract

Purpose

Working across languages is playing an increasingly important role in the delivery of mental health services, notably through psychotherapy and psychological therapies. Growing awareness of the complex processes that ensue in working across languages, including the presence and role of an interpreter, is generating new conceptualisations of practice, but there is a need now to evidence how these impact on service users. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the model for working with interpretation developed by Mothertongue multi-ethnic counselling service, which conceptualises the therapeutic process as working within triangular relationships consisting of service user, therapist and interpreter. Second, the paper discusses the qualitative, practice-near methods applied in, and findings from a pilot study to evaluate the interpreter's role.

Findings

Three patterns of response to interpreters were identified: negative impacts on the therapy, the interpreter as conduit for therapy and the therapist and interpreter jointly demonstrating a shared enterprise. It is concluded that the method and findings of the pilot justify a larger study that will further evaluate the experiences of service users and continue to develop and test conceptualisations for best practice.

Originality/value

Working across languages is now recognised as an increasingly important aspect of therapy in contexts where migration has created new demographics. This paper contributes to the discussion of working therapeutically with people with mental health difficulties across languages. Its originality lies, first, in the discussion of a new clinical approach to working with interpreters, and second in the methods used to access the views of service users about their experiences of interpreters.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article

Beverley Costa

Many people accessing services, including counselling services, do not speak the official language of the country in which they find themselves. This paper first…

Abstract

Many people accessing services, including counselling services, do not speak the official language of the country in which they find themselves. This paper first considers, in general terms, the way that language is used to negotiate relationships and to structure and provide meaning for our experiences, needs, feelings and ideas. This is then related to the use of native language in therapeutic work and the practical issues that this can present for services.The paper then reports on a small‐scale informal piece of research that was conducted in 2009 by Mothertongue multi‐ethnic counselling and listening service with six bilingual and multilingual counsellors, none of whom were native English speakers. The aim was to explore what might be learned from their experience of living with more than one language and then to apply this to the task of communicating in English with non‐English speakers in the therapeutic relationship.Some practical observations and suggestions are included in this paper. These incorporate the themes that emerged from the research such as: attending to clients' linguistic history; the way in which emotions are expressed in different languages; how speaking more than one language impacts on identity formation and the ability to understand across languages and culture; how we convey and construe significance and meaning; how we relate to people's experiences of learning a language. The author of this paper hopes that these findings and observations will stimulate further conversations on this topic.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article

Beverley Costa

This paper seeks to provide an overview of Mothertongue, a multi‐ethnic counselling service which offers volunteering opportunities for people from a range of black and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview of Mothertongue, a multi‐ethnic counselling service which offers volunteering opportunities for people from a range of black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds. The paper aims to explore the roles that volunteers occupy, the ways these have changed over the life of the organisation, and the ways in which they provide opportunities for social inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a descriptive account of the project with discussion of the challenges the organisation has faced during its development.

Findings

Mothertongue provides a safe community space for individuals in distress to try out a range of activities and roles through its volunteering opportunities; and to move between dependency, independence, and the ability to offer support to others. The volunteering opportunities promote social inclusion for both clients and volunteers – offering possibilities to meet with people from a wide range of cultures.

Originality/value

There are limited expositions of the ways in which a BME counselling service can develop a non‐clinical volunteering arm which develops people's often undervalued skills of bilingualism.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article

Adam Pozner

Abstract

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Abstract

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article

R. Lynn Rittenoure and Joseph E. Pluta

Social scientists writing in the development field often simply assume that public education expenditure in developing countries has been largely ineffective. Reasons…

Abstract

Social scientists writing in the development field often simply assume that public education expenditure in developing countries has been largely ineffective. Reasons offered in support of this assumption include uncertain goals and unsystematic implementation of programmes, lack of training of administrators, poor quality teachers and facilities, educators bound by tradition, systems modelled upon those of industrialised nations, and in some cases even graft and corruption. Although the above may reflect reality in many nations, full acceptance of these conditions as universal may severely restrict both necessary and useful analysis of the delivery of educational services in the developing world.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part

David Hearne, Rebecca Semmens-Wheeler and Kimberley M. Hill

One of the most heated discussions regarding Brexit is over the nature of any future trade deal the UK is going to sign with the EU. There have been endless discussions…

Abstract

One of the most heated discussions regarding Brexit is over the nature of any future trade deal the UK is going to sign with the EU. There have been endless discussions since the referendum result about this crucial aspect question and nothing has been so far agreed. Some analysts, however, have already pointed to a series of issues that anything different from the status quo could cause. The case analysed in the following pages serves as a cautionary tale, and there is an important reason for that. It is a good illustration of the issues that can emerge when countries are members of some forms of regional associations but not of others and whose consequences can produce spill-overs from pure trade matters to more serious security concerns.

It is not very often that something as common as the import and export of agricultural products – especially non-exotic fruits and vegetables – becomes the object of such a dispute across multiple states. This is what happened in the now infamous case of Chinese garlic exports, which have seen several instances of smuggling, conviction, and fraud all over Europe in the last 20 years. Most incidents have taken place in Northern Europe, particularly Sweden, Norway, the UK and Ireland. There’s a reason for that, which will be explained below.

Details

Brexit Negotiations After Article 50: Assessing Process, Progress and Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-768-3

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Article

Sarah Maddock and Beverley Hill

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key source of consumer information about food, utilises and implies varied associations between food and mood.

Design/methodology/approach

The research combines a textually oriented analysis with an analysis of the visual images in a sample of typical food advertisements drawn from women’s magazines.

Findings

Although healthy foods have the potential to enhance mood this is not often used as a key advertising message. Conversely, advertisements for foods that can depress mood frequently adopt messages of happiness and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research provides an initial investigation of advertising discourses of food and mood at a snapshot in time. Based on the findings derived from this limited sample, further research is suggested which would provide a more comprehensive survey of food advertising.

Practical implications

The research is of value to food promoters in suggesting that they review food messages and the use of emotional appeals in the light of developing scientific research on the link between food and mental wellbeing.

Social implications

The growing interest in promoting mental health and wellbeing means that consumers and governments are keen to understand the relationship between food and mood and its potential influence on consumer food choices.

Originality/value

This research indicates that some food advertising diverges from the scientific evidence on food and mental health and wellbeing. The research is therefore of value to food promoters and advertising regulators.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Paul Close and Rosie Collins

Evidence from a study in Middlesborough is presented in favour of the proposition that an adequate analysis of domestic labour in modern society depends on taking into…

Abstract

Evidence from a study in Middlesborough is presented in favour of the proposition that an adequate analysis of domestic labour in modern society depends on taking into account its content and distribution. In particular, the characteristics of the gender division of domestic labour suggest the need for an integrated theoretical approach which draws on the insights of both Marxists, concerning the development of the capitalist mode of production and feminists concerning the operation and impact of patriarchy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Carl A. Rodrigues and Harvey Blumberg

Do feminine cultures really behave more feminine than masculine cultures?. A comparison of 48 countries femininity‐masculineity ranking to their UN human development…

Abstract

Do feminine cultures really behave more feminine than masculine cultures?. A comparison of 48 countries femininity‐masculineity ranking to their UN human development rankings. Reveals that feminine cultures do apply greater intensity in investing in human development programmes, including care for the weak and gender equity development than masculine cultures. States that both score low on empowerment of females, suggesting that a countrys power distance measurement affects this. Implies that managers of international firms will find greater demand for improved quality of work and female empowerment programmes in feminine/small power distance countries than feminine high power distance countries and masculine countries. Qualifies comparisons by outlining problems within the UN statistical data.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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