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Article

Grace C. Khoury and Beverley McNally

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study exploring the challenges confronting the provision of human resource development (HRD) in large…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study exploring the challenges confronting the provision of human resource development (HRD) in large Palestinian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used to gather the data. The quantitative data were analysed using statistical programme for social sciences. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The first challenge pertained to the need for large-scale investment in human capital while at the same time facing serious resource constraints. Additional challenges were; the operational nature of the HR function, the limited training and development expertise and the lack of alignment between educational institutions and employers’ needs.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory study provides recommendations for future explanatory research to contribute to the literature examining national human resource development (NHRD) in high-conflict societies.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for both policy makers and the HRD profession. There are also implications for the prioritization of development funding.

Social implications

There is an identified need for closer alignment between the country’s education system, the needs of the workplace and the HRD function in organizations. The overarching recommendation is that the HRD function be considered from a NHRD and human capital theory perspectives.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its type to be conducted in Palestine. The findings highlight the importance of NHRD to the sustainable nation-building process in Palestine.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Paul Iles

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and…

Abstract

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and focus on the assessment centre as a potentially useful technique in this respect, especially for managerial selection. I go on to examine the assessment centre in more detail, including its origins, construction and uses, before discussing the strong evidence for its validity as a selection and assessment procedure. I then describe some recent British innovations in assessment centre design and practice, especially in its use for management and organisation development purposes, before discussing some of my own recent research, in collaboration with Ivan Robertson and Usha Rout, on participants' attitudes towards the use of assessment centres for selection and development purposes, including gender differences in attitudes.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

C Long, L Collins, C MacDonald, D Johnston and S Hardy

The effects of organisational change on a medium secure ward for women with developmental disabilities are examined. Intervention followed the BAITS model (Milne et al…

Abstract

The effects of organisational change on a medium secure ward for women with developmental disabilities are examined. Intervention followed the BAITS model (Milne et al, 2003) in focusing on behavioural analysis, intervention, training and support as a way of amalgamating psychological perspectives to address problems and promote positive attitude change. The positive benefits of this programme are described in terms of pre‐ and post‐changes in the perceived work environment, job satisfaction and burn‐out, and levels of disturbed behaviour. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of promoting positive evidence‐based practices in secure developmental disability services.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article

Yossef Meller and David Macarov

Responses to open‐ended questions concerning sources of work satisfaction among social workers indicate that instruments and methodology which have been devised in…

Abstract

Responses to open‐ended questions concerning sources of work satisfaction among social workers indicate that instruments and methodology which have been devised in industrial settings may create distortions when applied to human services. The most important sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction differ from those elicited in industry, a fact which points out the need to begin detailed research in the service sector using workers' own conceptions of their situation rather than preconceptions drawn from other areas of work.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Moshe Sherer

Games were used in social work, especially in group work, for many years (Abels & Abels, 1985; Zayas & Lewis, 1986). Games are recognized as a necessary part of human…

Abstract

Games were used in social work, especially in group work, for many years (Abels & Abels, 1985; Zayas & Lewis, 1986). Games are recognized as a necessary part of human development and thus have many applications in professional life (Dromi & Krampf, 1986). Computers became a growing source of help in our profession. Among their new applications they are used as games machines for educational or therapeutic purposes (Resnick & Sherer, 1989). This article deals with computerized games in social work. We will focus our attention on the current state of this art, analyze its potential applications in various fields of social work, and as an example introduce one such game and discuss its potential use.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 10 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Y. Meller and D. Macarov

The gradual shift from industrial to service economies which has been characteristic of all the western democracies for at least the last century has not been reflected in…

Abstract

The gradual shift from industrial to service economies which has been characteristic of all the western democracies for at least the last century has not been reflected in research on the services in a manner commensurate with the pace and importance of that shift. Although there are semantic and practical difficulties in defining exactly what is meant by services, one can discern a rough continuum running through most definitions and categorisations, with creating, altering, or combining material objects on one end of the continuum, and dealing with an individual's problems and needs through the use of a helping relationship on the other. Using this model, it is clear that the overwhelming majority of research studies into work attitudes, patterns, influences, productivity and so forth, have been towards the materials‐altering, or industrial, end of the continuum.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

P. Allsop, P. Findlay, M. McVicar and P. Wright

Early stages of research concerning the implementation andevaluation of performance indicators within academic quality‐controlprocedures of an English polytechnic are…

Abstract

Early stages of research concerning the implementation and evaluation of performance indicators within academic quality‐control procedures of an English polytechnic are described. The related perceptions of one distinctive group participating in validation/review processes – the course “Rapporteurs” – are considered before possible further developments of this qualitative illuminative enquiry are outlined.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

Alison J. Smith and John A. Piper

Management training and development is currently in vogue. Thereappears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in trainingand development. When a market is…

Abstract

Management training and development is currently in vogue. There appears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in training and development. When a market is buoyant is the time to consider and anticipate the consequences of a future downturn in demand. Such a downturn in demand may demonstrate increasing pressure to “justify” investment in training and development. There is a long established academic body of knowledge on the subject of evaluating training and development. From research evidence and the authors′ experience, the sponsors and the providers of training and development pay scant attention to systematic evaluation of these activities and investments. It is the authors′ contention that when the market′s critical assessment of the value of training and development increases there will be an increasing interest in evaluation. An overview of the history of evaluation traditions is provided and the state of play is commented upon. It is noted that there is a shortfall between theory and practice. It is argued that evaluation is a worthwhile and important activity and ways through the evaluation literature maze and the underpinnings of the activity are demonstrated, especially to management. Similarly the literature on evaluation techniques is reviewed. Tables are provided which demonstrate areas of major activity and identify relatively uncharted waters. This monograph provides a resource whereby practitioners can choose techniques which are appropriate to the activity on which they are engaged. It highlights the process which should be undertaken to make that choice in order that needs of the major stakeholders in the exercise are fully met.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article

Frank A. Heller

The “Peter Principle” is contradicted here. Alternative methods of decision making and research are examined and it is concluded that many organisations have untapped…

Abstract

The “Peter Principle” is contradicted here. Alternative methods of decision making and research are examined and it is concluded that many organisations have untapped reservoirs of skill and experience which, if utilised, could increase the talent available to companies.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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