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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

BETTY J. TUROCK

From July 9–13 in the oppressive heat and humidity of a Washington summer, more than 700 delegates and close to 300 alternates from all over the United States met in…

Abstract

From July 9–13 in the oppressive heat and humidity of a Washington summer, more than 700 delegates and close to 300 alternates from all over the United States met in Washington for the Second White House Conference on Library and Information Services. They filled the quotas set by law—25 percent from the profession, 25 percent from the general public, 25 percent from government, and 25 percent from library supporters. Delegates at‐large offset any imbalance in representation. Occasionally, honorary delegates—like Members of Congress with an interest in libraries—were also seen in the corridors where a good deal of the negotiations were conducted.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Betty J. Turock

A “gloomy career” is how the July 1986 issue of Working Woman describes librarianship, citing it as one of the 10 worst careers for women in 1986. Over 100 years ago…

Abstract

A “gloomy career” is how the July 1986 issue of Working Woman describes librarianship, citing it as one of the 10 worst careers for women in 1986. Over 100 years ago, women were encouraged to enter the library profession as a source of plentiful, educated, cheap labor. Half a century ago, Library Journal first chronicled the issue of competitive salaries. Today, we are still facing the dilemma of how to recruit and retain library professionals given the depressed salaries paid to MLS graduates.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

BETTY J. TUROCK

Since the breakup of AT&T, policy debates on the provision of information services—including broadband telecommunications and electronic information—has made news. For…

Abstract

Since the breakup of AT&T, policy debates on the provision of information services—including broadband telecommunications and electronic information—has made news. For librarians, the issues have come closer to home in this decade, as court decisions and pending legislation have put the spotlight on whether regional phone companies should be allowed to supply information services directly. Now librarians are trying to develop a position that would favor library interests.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2005

Barbara Simpson Darden and Betty K. Turock

For over two decades, we have known from melding fertility and immigration data, that the population of the United States would become steadily more diverse. Throughout…

Abstract

For over two decades, we have known from melding fertility and immigration data, that the population of the United States would become steadily more diverse. Throughout the 1990s it was reported that one in four persons in the nation was a minority. By the time we entered the new millennium, that figure increased to one in three. Now it is predicted that in the year 2030, the emerging majority of Americans will be people of color. No matter the type of library or information agency, in this century all will face the challenge of providing service to population within the context of an entirely new order of pluralism.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Betty Turock

Though libraries and businesses may differ in their ultimate objectives, libraries can benefit from adapting some business practices to suit their environments. This…

Abstract

Though libraries and businesses may differ in their ultimate objectives, libraries can benefit from adapting some business practices to suit their environments. This article describes library values which bring uniqueness to the library as an institution, and details ways in which libraries can adopt and benefit from three current business trends: creating organizations in which innovation can flourish, creating organizations that prepare and live by strategic plans, and creating organizations that participate in the national political arena.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Betty J. Turock and Andrea Pedolsky

It is imperative that every library have a financial plan. The library cannot be managed properly without one, especially if values, not expedience, are to determine…

Abstract

It is imperative that every library have a financial plan. The library cannot be managed properly without one, especially if values, not expedience, are to determine priorities. The authors review the basics and then carefully outline how best to create a financial plan that will involve staff, internal and external stakeholders, and maintain or improve services.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

James H. Walther

Abstract

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The Bottom Line, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Graham P Cornish

The majority of the articles reviewed this time deal with ILL and public libraries in one way or another. The review begins by looking at school libraries and their…

Abstract

The majority of the articles reviewed this time deal with ILL and public libraries in one way or another. The review begins by looking at school libraries and their ability to handle ILL requests satisfactorily amongst themselves and then examines several papers critical of networking in public libraries. There is an argument that public libraries hardly need ILL at all because of the nature of their users and their needs. ILL is an expensive operation and the issue of fees and charges is much debated; the discussion examined here includes the suggestion that users can travel to consult materials and public libraries might ration ILL requests per user including children. The idea of using ILL as a revenue earner, or at least paying for itself, is questioned and a study of commercial document supply services is examined which pays special attention to the performance of the many sources available. A paper on ILL costing almost nothing is criticized as not taking account of all factors. Time, as well as money, is important and a study of supply time to the user shows that more could be done by requesting libraries to speed supply to the end‐user. The impact of network membership on ILL is considered and shows that net borrowers can soon become net lenders and vice‐versa. The reorganization of document supply from the US National Library of Medicine had considerable impact on the use of NLM which is analysed. Finally a note on the political aspects of ILL in southern Africa is noticed as dealing with an issue of potential significance.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Betty J. Turock

Diversity issues pervade a world connected by electronic advances that have closed distances and made possible millisecond communication. In the USA, and throughout the…

Abstract

Diversity issues pervade a world connected by electronic advances that have closed distances and made possible millisecond communication. In the USA, and throughout the world, the seeds of one of the major challenges for library and information science reside within these diversity issues. Even as demographic ballasts are shifting around the globe, our professional moorings remain static. Data on the student body of the American Library Association accredited master's programs in library and information science located in the USA illustrate insufficient gains to respond to the heightened diversity of the nation in the twenty‐first century. This paper sets out the development of a diverse professional workforce and diverse professional leaders within four streams of research and theory, which point the way to a model for the future. The first arises from a feminist perspective combined with the second, the historical conceptualization of leadership over time, which overlooks or obscures the contributions of minority populations. The third stream identifies factors impacting the recruitment of minority groups, taken together, are currently emerging as the majority in the USA. The fourth focuses on interdependence between educators and practitioners as a key to increasing diversity in educational programs and professional leadership. A model arising from the four streams is presented. The creation of a global program that advances interdependence and equity is outlined.

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New Library World, vol. 104 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

W. David Penniman

All libraries, whether in the public or private sector, operate in a competitive arena. They compete with other organizations for finite and scarce resources in a zerosum…

Abstract

All libraries, whether in the public or private sector, operate in a competitive arena. They compete with other organizations for finite and scarce resources in a zerosum game. Unfortunately, there are winners and losers. The losers are not necessarily the organizations that have the least to offer; they are often the organizations least prepared to express their value and contribution in terms understood by their funders.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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