Search results

1 – 10 of 67
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Vaughan C. Judd and Betty J. Tims

Although some institutions of higher learning seem to have difficulty acknowledging it, teaching should be the single most important part of their mission; it is a college…

Abstract

Although some institutions of higher learning seem to have difficulty acknowledging it, teaching should be the single most important part of their mission; it is a college or university's reason for being. Accordingly, the primary mission of an academic library should be to support the teaching mission of the university. For example, in three college libraries with successful bibliographic instruction (BI) programs, library directors viewed the teaching role of the library as central to the purpose of the library. Teaching support from the library, and interaction between the library staff and the university's teaching faculty and students, can come in a variety of ways, one of which is BI. Bibliographic instruction is an activity that bridges the gap between academicians and librarians. Although BI can be generic or integrated (subject‐specific), the latter seems to offer greater potential for close interaction between librarians and the teaching faculty. Course‐integrated BI has been described as bibliographic instruction designed as a part of course objectives, and viewed as essential to knowledge of the subject and successful completion of the course. This article describes a series of four unique workshops that meet this definition of course‐integrated bibliographic instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Betty J. Tims

Over the years much has been written about integrated library instruction and its importance as a viable, effective method of bibliographic instruction. Indeed, a study by…

Abstract

Over the years much has been written about integrated library instruction and its importance as a viable, effective method of bibliographic instruction. Indeed, a study by Judith Pask showed that eighty‐eight percent of the academic libraries surveyed were using integrated library instruction. There is, however, a form of integrated library instruction, team teaching, about which little has been written. For purposes of this paper, team teaching is defined as a team composed of a professional librarian and an academic faculty member teaching the same course. A review of the literature over the past two decades showed only one reference to team teaching. Porter, Lanning, and Warner discussed a team teaching experience in which a chemistry professor and librarian alternately lectured in a one‐hour credit course with one instructor present at a time in the classroom. However, there is a type of team teaching, which this author has designated as interactive team teaching, to which no references in the literature were found. Interactive team teaching is defined as two instructors from different disciplines in the classroom at the same time. A case study of interactive team teaching follows.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Betty J. Tims and Vaughan C. Judd

Reference and document librarians are increasingly faced with questions about international marketing as a result of globalization. Knowing where to look for specialized…

Abstract

Reference and document librarians are increasingly faced with questions about international marketing as a result of globalization. Knowing where to look for specialized information of this kind can be a daunting task. While the focus of this paper is to describe an international marketing workshop, the sources described and the types of questions raised in the workshop can be helpful to busy reference librarians. This paper describes four US government sources that are available in electronic format. Using these electronic sources, librarians can quickly answer a variety of questions, or show patrons how they can find information free of charge.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Vaughan C. Judd, Lucy I. Farrow and Betty J. Tims

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the attempt to find an evaluation instrument for undergraduate students to use to evaluate public web sites, the analysis of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the attempt to find an evaluation instrument for undergraduate students to use to evaluate public web sites, the analysis of the variety of instruments discovered, the subsequent development of an appropriate instrument, and the application of the instrument in workshops with students.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument was created based on the following criteria that the authors determined would meet the students' needs. It focuses exclusively on the information aspect of a web site, has some basis in theory or is based on an accepted model, is parsimonious, is quantitative, with both absolute and relative measures, and indicates whether or not the information should be accepted or rejected. The instrument was also developed with the goal of focusing on the process rather than the outcome.

Findings

Although a number of diverse evaluation instruments from the literature and from web‐based sources were examined, none was deemed suitable for students to use so the authors developed their own.

Originality/value

The authors concurred that, based on their assessment of the learning environment, the focus of an instrument should be on evaluation as a process.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and research…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and research and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the fifteenth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1988. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Ben Kerrane, Shona M Bettany and Katy Kerrane

– This paper explores how siblings act as agents of consumer socialisation within the dynamics of the family network.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores how siblings act as agents of consumer socialisation within the dynamics of the family network.

Design/methodology/approach

Key consumer socialisation literature is reviewed, highlighting the growing role that siblings play in the lives of contemporary children. The authors’ interpretive, exploratory study is introduced which captures the voices of children themselves through a series of in-depth interviews.

Findings

A series of socialisation behaviours are documented, with children working in both positive and negative ways to develop the consumer skills of their siblings. A fourfold typology of sibling relationships is described, capturing the dynamic of sibling relationships and parental approaches to parenting vis-à-vis consumption. This typology is then used to present a typology of nascent child consumer identities that begin to emerge as a result of socialisation processes within the family setting.

Research limitations/implications

The role siblings play in the process of consumer socialisation has potentially important implications in terms of the understanding of the socialisation process itself, and where/how children obtain product information. Scope exists to explore the role siblings play as agents of consumer socialisation across a wider variety of family types/sibling variables presented here (e.g. to explore how age/gender shapes the dynamics of sibling–sibling learning).

Originality/value

Through adopting a networked approach to family life, the authors show how the wider family dynamic informs sibling–sibling relationships and resulting socialisation behaviours. The findings problematise the view that parents alone act as the main conduits of consumer learning within the family environment, highlighting how parent–child relationships, in turn, work to inform sibling–sibling socialisation behaviour and developing consumer identities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Alka Gupta, Jerry Chen and Vishal K. Gupta

Studies of entrepreneurial orientation tend to merge its three components‐proactiveness, risk-taking, and innovativeness‐into a monolithic construct and analyze its…

Abstract

Studies of entrepreneurial orientation tend to merge its three components‐proactiveness, risk-taking, and innovativeness‐into a monolithic construct and analyze its relationship with firm outcomes at one point in time. This has resulted in knowledge voids related to the relative importance of the different components, their specific effect on value created by the firm, and their evolution over time. The present study links each component of entrepreneurial orientation to economic value creation using a longitudinal dataset. Results provide support for hypothesized relationships. Implications and avenues for future research are discussed.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Charlotte Reypens and Sheen S. Levine

With behavioral experiments and protocol analysis, researchers can capture cognition in action. Using behavioral experiments, they can study realized behavior, not…

Abstract

With behavioral experiments and protocol analysis, researchers can capture cognition in action. Using behavioral experiments, they can study realized behavior, not perception or self-reports. And they can do that in a controlled laboratory environment to establish causality, curbing spurious relationships. With protocol analysis, a method to elicit decision-makers’ thoughts, researchers can tap into cognitive processes. In combination, the two methods offer a novel approach to grasp mental processes alongside behavior, to reach causality and replicate findings. We describe the methods, demonstrate how researchers can apply them, and share practices from the design of experimental instruments to the replication of findings.

Details

Methodological Challenges and Advances in Managerial and Organizational Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-677-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

Turgut Var, William W. Swart and Charles E. Gearing

Although this is a survey of research techniques, it has become increasingly apparent, as the study has progressed, that our investigation of research methods for use in…

Abstract

Although this is a survey of research techniques, it has become increasingly apparent, as the study has progressed, that our investigation of research methods for use in tourism and travel studies, without prior consideration of the nature and scopes of tourism and travel themselves, would he inadequate. At the outset it would be imperative to distinguish three interrelated terms. These are recreation, tourism, and travel.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Elaine Enarson and Lourdes Meyreles

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of…

Abstract

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of differences and similarities in women’s disaster experiences and the differing research questions raised by these patterns in the scholarly and practice‐based literature. The analysis supports the claim that how gender is theorized makes a difference in public policy and practical approaches to disaster risk management. We propose new directions in the field of disaster social science and contribute a current bibliography in the emerging gender and disaster field.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 67