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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Beth Sundstrom, Heather M. Brandt, Lisa Gray and Jennifer Young Pierce

Cervical cancer (CxCa) incidence and mortality remain unacceptably high in South Carolina, USA, presenting an ideal opportunity for intervention. To address this need…

Abstract

Purpose

Cervical cancer (CxCa) incidence and mortality remain unacceptably high in South Carolina, USA, presenting an ideal opportunity for intervention. To address this need, Cervical Cancer-Free South Carolina developed an academic-community partnership with researchers and students at a public university to design, implement, and evaluate a theory-based CxCa communication campaign, It’s My Time. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The goal of this campaign was to decrease CxCa by increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and appropriate screening. This paper describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a successful theory-based CxCa prevention communication campaign for college women based on formative audience research and targeted messages delivered to audience segments through new and traditional communication channels. The health belief model (HBM) served as a theoretical framework for the campaign throughout development, implementation, and evaluation.

Findings

This campaign demonstrated the effectiveness of the HBM to address CxCa prevention, including HPV vaccine acceptability. The campaign aimed to increase perceptions of susceptibility, which were low, by emphasizing that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection. A community-based grassroots approach to addressing disparities in CxCa prevention increased benefits and decreased barriers. Social media emerged as a particularly appropriate platform to disseminate cues to action. In total, 60 percent of participants who responded to an anonymous web-based survey evaluation indicated that they received the HPV vaccine as a result of campaign messages.

Originality/value

This paper offers practical suggestions to campaign planners about building academic-community partnerships to develop theory-based communication campaigns that include conducting formative research, segmenting target audiences, engaging with young people, and incorporating social media.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Beth Sundstrom and Abbey Blake Levenshus

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the dialogic theory of public relations can help strategic communication practitioners support and enhance the relationship…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the dialogic theory of public relations can help strategic communication practitioners support and enhance the relationship between individuals and organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This inquiry applied the dialogic theory of public relations by investigating leading media companies’ context-based strategic use of Twitter. Researchers conducted a qualitative content analysis of 1,800 tweets from 18 top-performing media organizations.

Findings

This study identified strategies, rooted in dialogic theoretical principles that media organizations used to engage stakeholders. Media companies employed strategies based on dialogic principles, including promoting organizations as industry and thought leaders, integrating social media, and using an interactive, synergistic organizational voice.

Research limitations/implications

These strategies support the need to expand theoretical conceptualizations and use of dialogic principles to study online communication.

Practical implications

Findings offer practical strategies for practitioners managing organizations’ Twitter communication to foster engagement. In particular, practitioners should consider organizational context and subsequent content advantages.

Originality/value

Findings offer practical and theoretical contributions to the debate of interactivity.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Cara Delay and Beth Sundstrom

This chapter examines symphysiotomy in twentieth-century Ireland as one example of a systematized obstetric violence that has characterized Ireland’s modern history…

Abstract

This chapter examines symphysiotomy in twentieth-century Ireland as one example of a systematized obstetric violence that has characterized Ireland’s modern history. Expanding scholarly interpretations of state- and Church-inflicted abuse of women in the twentieth century, this analysis establishes the medical profession as a central actor alongside the twentieth-century state-Church coalition that regulated women’s reproductive lives and engaged in systematic repression. This chapter recognizes that Ireland’s history of reproductive abuse and coercion did not just involve contraception or abortion but also labor and birth experiences. In addition, it offers a more complete and complex interpretation of obstetric violence by highlighting the experiences of married women with wanted pregnancies; almost all research to date focuses on the experiences of unmarried pregnant women or unwanted pregnancies. This examination of symphysiotomy and obstetric violence in Ireland illuminates the ways in which religious, national, and medical power has been mapped on women’s reproductive bodies, particularly in the decades after independence in 1922. It also makes essential links between Ireland’s past and present, demonstrating that a careful analysis of the history of obstetric violence and the religious underpinnings of it are essential in understanding Ireland today. With this research, we also place symphysiotomy within the context of the global reproductive justice movement, asking how a reproductive justice framework – one that links reproductive rights with social justice – can help us interpret obstetric violence and address the wounds of Ireland’s past.

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Beth Sundstrom, Rowena Lyn Briones and Melissa Janoske

The purpose of this paper is to explore a postmodern approach to crisis management through the lens of complexity theory to understand six non-profit organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a postmodern approach to crisis management through the lens of complexity theory to understand six non-profit organizations’ communication responses to anti-abortion terrorism.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers conducted a qualitative content analysis of publicly available documents from six non-profit organizations, which included 62 news releases and statements on organization web sites, 152 tweets, and 63 articles in national and local newspapers.

Findings

A history of violence and rituals of remembrance emerged as important pieces of organizational, personal, and social history surrounding anti-abortion terrorism. The process of self-organization facilitated calling publics to action and combating the “terrorism” naming problem. The non-profits’ dynamic environment exemplified the importance of coalition building to construct digital attractor basins, or networks extending beyond permeable boundaries, through a variety of strategies, including new media. Twitter served as a strange attractor, where the concept of interacting agents emerged as a key component of relationship building.

Research limitations/implications

Findings provide opportunities to expand complexity theory.

Practical implications

Findings suggest practical implications for anti-abortion counterterrorism and crisis management, and provide opportunities to develop communication counter measures.

Originality/value

Applying a complexity lens to the study of anti-abortion counterterrorism builds on the growing emphasis of the postmodern approach to crisis management and answers the call for further inquiry into the application of complexity theory to crisis situations. Furthermore, this study fills a gap in the study of crisis management by investigating how multiple organizations handle a crisis.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Beth Sundstrom

Theories of prosumption offer social marketers an opportunity to improve market segmentation strategies and health campaigns by improving understanding of audiences. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Theories of prosumption offer social marketers an opportunity to improve market segmentation strategies and health campaigns by improving understanding of audiences. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to understand how women produce and consume ideologies of pregnancy.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 19 pregnant women ages 24‐38 years completed qualitative, in‐depth interviews. Data analysis included a grounded theory approach and constant‐comparative method using open and axial coding to reduce the data and identify themes across the data.

Findings

This study addressed prosumption in three meaning‐making sites: the physiological basis of pregnancy; perceptions of medicine and the biomedical model during pregnancy; and perceptions of media surrounding pregnancy.

Research limitations/implications

This study applied prosumption theory in a new social context: pregnant women. Findings articulate the importance of gender and the necessity of incorporating women's lived experiences into theories of prosumption.

Practical implications

Social marketers benefit from improved understandings of pregnant women's body identity, perceptions, and opportunities for empowerment and agency in reproductive health. The proposed “purist pregnant woman” myth impacts effective strategies in social marketing and health communication campaigns. Findings suggest that pregnant women may serve as a receptive audience for a range of health issues.

Social implications

This study extends our understanding of prosumers, suggesting that prosumption of pregnancy reduces alienation, humanizes and demedicalizes health care and the birthing process.

Originality/value

This study offers theoretical and practical implications for social marketing and health communication campaigns to improve pregnancy health outcomes through an improved understanding of prosumers.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Anne Powell, John Galvin and Gabriele Piccoli

The paper has two primary purposes: the first is to determine antecedents to commitment to a work team; the second to compare how antecedents to commitment differ between…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper has two primary purposes: the first is to determine antecedents to commitment to a work team; the second to compare how antecedents to commitment differ between collocated and virtual teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected using 52 three‐member teams – 28 collocated teams and 24 virtual teams using graduate students from three countries.

Findings

Results indicate that team work processes and member effort have a significant, positive relationship with trust in collocated teams, but results for virtual teams show that member efforts is not a significant predictor of trust. Comparing collocated teams and virtual teams, collocated teams had stronger relationships (compared to virtual teams) between member effort and trust, and between trust and normative commitment. Virtual teams had stronger relationships (compared to collocated teams) between work processes and trust, and between trust and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Additional studies of longer‐term teams are needed to see if results remain consistent. One form of commitment (continuance), in particular, can be studied in long‐term teams.

Practical implications

Managers of work teams need to firmly establish a foundation of trust to ensure commitment of team members. Managers of virtual teams should particularly organize and communicate work processes to be followed by virtual team members.

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted examining antecedents to commitment to the work team, as well as commitment to a work team when work is conducted using technology (e.g. virtual teams). This paper fills a void in these two areas.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Ronald J. Burke, Julia M. Bristor and Mitch Rothstein

Although more women are entering managerial and professional jobs with increasingly appropriate academic and experience credentials for upward mobility, few of them make…

Abstract

Although more women are entering managerial and professional jobs with increasingly appropriate academic and experience credentials for upward mobility, few of them make it to senior management or executive ranks (Morrison & Von Glinow, 1990). They encounter a glass ceiling (Morrison, White & Van Velsor, 1987), an almost impenetrable barrier, which prevents them from reaching the top levels.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Kristina Heinonen, Maria Holmlund and Tore Strandvik

570

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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