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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Ijaz Ul Haq and Fiorenzo Franceschini

The purpose of this paper is to develop a preliminary conceptual scale for the measurement of distributed manufacturing (DM) capacity of manufacturing companies operating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a preliminary conceptual scale for the measurement of distributed manufacturing (DM) capacity of manufacturing companies operating in rubber and plastic sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-step research methodology is employed. In first step, the dimensions of DM and different levels of each dimension have been defined. In second step, an empirical analysis (cluster analysis) of database firms is performed by collecting the data of 38 firms operating in Italian mould manufacturing sector. Application case studies are then analyzed to show the use of the proposed DM conceptual scale.

Findings

A hyperspace, composed of five dimensions of DM, i.e. manufacturing localization; manufacturing technologies; customization and personalization; digitalization; and democratization of design, is developed and a hierarchy is defined by listing the levels of each dimension in an ascending order. Based on this hyperspace, a conceptual scale is proposed to measure the positioning of a generic company in the DM continuum.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical data are collected from Italian mould manufacturing companies operating in rubber and plastic sectors. It cannot be assumed that the industrial sectors in different parts of the world are operating under similar operational, regulatory and economic conditions. The results, therefore, might not be generalized to manufacturing companies operating in different countries (particularly developing countries) under different circumstances.

Originality/value

This is first preliminary scale of its kind to evaluate the positioning of companies with respect to their DM capacity. This scale is helpful for companies to compare their capacity with standard profiles and for decision making to convert the existing manufacturing operations into distributed operations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

142

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 77 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Samuel Forsman, Niclas Björngrim, Anders Bystedt, Lars Laitila, Peter Bomark and Micael Öhman

The construction industry has been criticized for not keeping up with other production industries in terms of cost efficiency, innovation, and production methods. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry has been criticized for not keeping up with other production industries in terms of cost efficiency, innovation, and production methods. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge about what hampers efficiency in supplying engineer‐to‐order (ETO) joinery‐products to the construction process. The objective is to identify the main contributors to inefficiency and to define areas for innovation in improving this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies of the supply chain of a Swedish ETO joinery‐products supplier are carried out, and observations, semi‐structured interviews, and documents from these cases are analysed from an efficiency improvement perspective.

Findings

From a lean thinking and information modelling perspective, longer‐term procurement relations and efficient communication of information are the main areas of innovation for enhancing the efficiency of supplying ETO joinery‐products. It seems to be possible to make improvements in planning and coordination, assembly information, and spatial measuring through information modelling and spatial scanning technology. This is likely to result in an increased level of prefabrication, decreased assembly time, and increased predictability of on‐site work.

Originality/value

The role of supplying ETO joinery‐products is a novel research area in construction. There is a need to develop each segment of the manufacturing industry supplying construction and this paper contributes to the collective knowledge in this area. The focus is on the possibilities for innovation in the ETO joinery‐products industry and on its improved integration in the construction industry value chain in general.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

C. Ball, D. Fairclough and J.E. Ruckman

To investigate consumers’ perceptions of appearance and handle of the chest area and the lapel in men’s tailored jackets, both objective measurement using FAST and…

Abstract

To investigate consumers’ perceptions of appearance and handle of the chest area and the lapel in men’s tailored jackets, both objective measurement using FAST and subjective assessment utilising semi‐structured interview were employed. It was found that objective measurement provides insufficient information to predict the tailorability if reliance is placed purely upon properties obtained from shell fabrics. Use of the fabric and interlining laminates, however, provides better prediction of tailorability, especially those aspects associated with appearance and shape retention. It was also found that objective measurement results do not agree with the subjective assessment results, particularly with regard to the subjective assessment of the female interviewees. It is suggested that thought should be given to devising a method of evaluating objective measurement results suitable to fabric and interlining laminates that can also take account of market trends directly related to consumer perception.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1991

In a major move to strengthen their product base, Amba Lamps Ltd of Banbury, Oxfordshire is now manufacturing short wave IR lamps. Since entering speciality lamp production

Abstract

In a major move to strengthen their product base, Amba Lamps Ltd of Banbury, Oxfordshire is now manufacturing short wave IR lamps. Since entering speciality lamp production just three years ago, Amba has grown to be one of Europe's premier speciality lamp producers. More than 60% of the production of all their lamps is exported to countries as far apart as Japan and the USA, Australia and Russia, India and Venezuela. The company confidently predicts that their new IR lamps will follow a similar pattern with about two thirds of the production going overseas.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 20 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Ijaz Ul Haq, James Andrew Colwill, Chris Backhouse and Fiorenzo Franceschini

Lean distributed manufacturing (LDM) is being considered as an enabler of achieving sustainability and resilience in manufacturing and supply chain operations. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Lean distributed manufacturing (LDM) is being considered as an enabler of achieving sustainability and resilience in manufacturing and supply chain operations. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of how LDM characteristics affect the resilience of manufacturing companies by drawing upon the experience of food manufacturing companies operating in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a conceptual model to analyse the impact of LDM on the operational resilience of food manufacturing companies. A triangulation research methodology (secondary data analysis, field observations and structured interviews) is used in this study. In a first step, LDM enablers and resilience elements are identified from literature. In a second step, empirical evidence is collected from six food sub-sectors aimed at identifying LDM enablers being practised in companies.

Findings

The analysis reveals that LDM enablers can improve the resilience capabilities of manufacturing companies at different stages of resilience action cycle, whereas the application status of different LDM enablers varies in food manufacturing companies. The findings include the development of a conceptual model (based on literature) and a relationship matrix between LDM enablers and resilience elements.

Practical implications

The developed relationship matrix is helpful for food manufacturing companies to assess their resilience capability in terms of LDM characteristics and then formulate action plans to incorporate relevant LDM enablers to enhance operational resilience.

Originality/value

Based on the literature review, no studies exist that investigate the effects of LDM on factory’s resilience, despite many research studies suggesting distributed manufacturing as an enabler of sustainability and resilience.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Peter Tatham, Jennifer Loy and Umberto Peretti

3D printing (3DP), which is technically known as additive manufacturing, is being increasingly used for the development of bespoke products within a broad range of…

1062

Abstract

Purpose

3D printing (3DP), which is technically known as additive manufacturing, is being increasingly used for the development of bespoke products within a broad range of commercial contexts. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential for this technology to be used in support of the preparation and response to a natural disaster or complex emergency and as part of developmental activities, and to offer a number of key insights following a pilot trial based in the East African HQ of a major international non-governmental organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an illustrative example from the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) field this paper demonstrates, from both a theoretical and practical standpoint, how 3DP has the potential to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of humanitarian logistic (HL) operations.

Findings

Based on the pilot trial, the paper confirms that the benefits of 3DP in bespoke commercial contexts – including the reduction of supply chain lead times, the use of logistic postponement techniques and the provision of customised solutions to meet unanticipated operational demands – are equally applicable in a humanitarian environment. It also identifies a number of key challenges that will need to be overcome in the operationalisation of 3DP in a development/disaster response context, and proposes a hub-and-spoke model – with the design and testing activities based in the hub supporting field-based production at the spokes – to mitigate these.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to an extensive review of both the HL and additive manufacturing literature, the results of the pilot trial of 3DP in support of humanitarian operations, are reported. The paper recommends further detailed analysis of the underpinning cost model together with further field trials of the recommended organisational construct and testing of the most appropriate materials for a given artefact and environment.

Practical implications

3DP has the potential to improve the response to disasters and development operations through the swift production of items of equipment or replacement spare parts. With low capital and running costs, it offers a way of mitigating delays in the supply chain through on site fabrication to meet an identified requirement more swiftly and effectively than via the traditional re-supply route, and it allows for adaptive design practice as multiple iterations of a product are possible in order to optimise the design based on field testing.

Social implications

The logistic challenges of responding in a disaster affected or development environment are well documented. Successful embodiment of 3DP as part of the humanitarian logistician’s portfolio of operational techniques has the potential to deliver more efficient and effective outcomes in support of the beneficiaries as well as a sense of empowerment in relation to problem solving. In addition, it has the longer term potential for the creation of a new industry (and, hence, income source) for those living in remote locations.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that, whilst 3DP is increasingly found in a commercial environment, its use has not previously been trialled in a humanitarian context. The research reported in this paper confirms the potential for 3DP to become a game-changer, especially in locations which are logistically difficulty to support.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

David Russell, David Calvey and Mark Banks

This paper examines how small firms that produce “e‐learning” materials collaborate and communicate with their clients, external agencies and end users. Our premise is…

1436

Abstract

This paper examines how small firms that produce “e‐learning” materials collaborate and communicate with their clients, external agencies and end users. Our premise is this: given increased demands for more sophisticated and “learning‐led” products, it is becoming increasingly crucial for e‐learning firms to source and exploit content, education, knowledge and expertise that is extrinsic to the traditional boundaries of the “firm”. These shifts raise a set of problems related to how firms can effectively interact and collaborate with others in order to create, distribute and evolve effective e‐learning tools and products. Based on our own case study research and building on the existing literature on “communities of practice”, we argue that the formation of new “learning communities” is a strategy now being undertaken by leading firms in order to meet demands for “learning‐led” products.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jun Du, Yuan‐Yuan Jiao and Jianxin Jiao

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing…

1753

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional production management systems are often designed to support manufacturing based on a limited number of product variants. With the emerging trend of producing customized products to meet diverse customer needs, the number of product variants increases exponentially in mass customization. In a situation of assembly‐to‐order production, production planning and control involve not only product variety, but also process variety. It is imperative to synchronize product and process variety in a coherent manner.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses integrated product and production data management for assembly‐to‐order production. An integrated BOM and routing generator is proposed for the purpose of unifying BOM and assembly‐planning data in order to accommodate a wide range of product variability and production variations.

Findings

An integrated BOM and routing generator excels in variety synchronization for assembly‐to‐order production planning.

Research limitations/implications

Variety synchronization opens many opportunities for research into mass customization production. It is important to deal with not only the results of high variety production but also the causes of process variations.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is applicable to manage high variety production like mass customization.

Originality/value

The paper proposes the variety synchronization issue in mass customization. An object‐oriented methodology is applied to manage variety of BOMs and variety of routings.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Jagjit Singh Srai, Gary Graham, Patrick Hennelly, Wendy Phillips, Dharm Kapletia and Harri Lorentz

The emergence of distributed manufacturing (DM) is examined as a new form of localised production, distinct from previous manifestations of multi-domestic and indigenous…

4534

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of distributed manufacturing (DM) is examined as a new form of localised production, distinct from previous manifestations of multi-domestic and indigenous production.

Design/methodology/approach

Supply network (SN) configuration and infrastructural provisioning perspectives were used to examine the literature on established localised production models as well as DM. A multiple case study was then undertaken to describe and explore the DM model further. A maximum variation sampling procedure was used to select five exemplar cases.

Findings

Three main contributions emerge from this study. First, the research uniquely brings together two bodies of literature, namely SN configuration and infrastructure provisioning to explore the DM context. Second, the research applies these theoretical lenses to establish the distinctive nature of DM across seven dimensions of analysis. Third, emerging DM design rules are identified and compared with the more established models of localised production, drawing on both literature and DM case evidence.

Practical implications

This study provides a rich SN configuration and infrastructural provisioning view on DM leading to a set of design rules for DM adoption, thus supporting practitioners in their efforts to develop viable DM implementation plans.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the intra- and inter-organisational requirements for the emerging DM context by providing new perspectives through the combined lenses of SN configuration and infrastructural provisioning approaches.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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