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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Berta Schnettler, Néstor Sepúlveda, Silvana Bravo, Klaus G. Grunert and Clementina Hueche

The purpose of this paper is to explore the consumer acceptance of a functional meat processed product made with different meat sources, and to distinguish the existence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the consumer acceptance of a functional meat processed product made with different meat sources, and to distinguish the existence of different market segments.

Design/methodology/approach

Non-probability sampling was used to recruit a sample of 411 consumers in Southern Chile, over the age of 18 and responsible for the purchase of meat products for their household.

Findings

Using a fractional factorial design for conjoint analysis, it was found in the total sample that the meat source of the meat processed product was more important than packaging, region of origin, price and the functional ingredient claim, with preference for lamb and pork meat processed products with omega-3. Two main segments were identified using a cluster analysis; these segments differed according to family size, presence and age of children, ethnic origin, general health interest, quality of diet and level of satisfaction with food-related life. The largest segment (56.0 percent) shows a high preference toward lamb meat processed product with dietary fiber and omega-3. The second (33.6 percent) preferred turkey meat processed product with antioxidants.

Practical implications

A differentiated marketing strategy with different meat sources and functional ingredients may give access to a large market share. People more willing to accept different functional ingredients in processed meat products may enjoy a better quality of life. The level of satisfaction with food-related life and quality of diet can be useful in explaining preferences for functional meat processed products.

Originality/value

This is the first study to evaluate consumer acceptance of a functional meat processed product made with three different meats and three different functional ingredient claims, which analyzed the relationship between acceptance, the consumer’s quality of diet and their level of satisfaction with food-related life.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Berta Schnettler, Cristian Adasme-Berríos, Klaus G. Grunert, María Paulina Márquez, German Lobos, Natalia Salinas-Oñate, Ligia Orellana and José Sepúlveda

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of attitudes towards functional foods (AFF) on university students’ satisfaction with food-related life (SWFL) and to…

1724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of attitudes towards functional foods (AFF) on university students’ satisfaction with food-related life (SWFL) and to distinguish student typologies, considering that the AFF are not homogeneous among consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was applied to 372 university students (mean age=20.4 years, SD=2.4) in Southern Chile. The questionnaire included the AFF questionnaire and the SWFL scale, questions about consumption and knowledge about functional food (FF) and socio-demographic characteristics.

Findings

Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling, it was found that AFF directly and significantly influence students’ SWFL. A cluster analysis applied to the Z-scores from the factors obtained by the CFA classified three typologies: positive towards FF (36.3 per cent), moderately positive towards FF (43.0 per cent) and negative towards FF (20.7 per cent). The positive towards FF type had a significantly greater SWFL score than the negative towards FF type. The types differ according to consumption and knowledge about FF.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the context of only one country in South America.

Originality/value

This study is the first that assesses the effect of AFF on SWFL in a sample of university students. Fostering positive attitudes towards FF will allow for a growth in the degree of SWFL of university students with features similar to those of the study sample.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Luis Aliaga-Ortega, Cristian Adasme-Berríos, Caren Méndez, Carolina Soto and Berta Schnettler

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of nutritional warning (NW) labels on the behavior of consumers of processed foods, considering demographic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of nutritional warning (NW) labels on the behavior of consumers of processed foods, considering demographic and psychological factors associated with the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The study had a descriptive and cross-sectional design. A survey was applied to 200 household food decision makers from central Chile. This questionnaire was developed based on the planned behavior theory that evaluates the psychological constructs of human behavior: Attitude (ATT), Subjective Norms (SN), Perceived Behavioral Control (PBC) and Purchase Intention (PI) toward processed foods with NW. Sociodemographic variables were also included. The data were analyzed by using a multinomial logit (MNL) model, where three types of categories are established depending on the choice made by the consumer. Thus, the dependent variable responds to the effect of the following probabilities: Eliminate from Consumption, Do Not Eliminate from Consumption and Do Not Know whether or not to eliminate from consumption when selecting a food processed with NW.

Findings

The results show that the implementation of NW has significant effects on the choice of processed foods purchases made by Chilean consumers. Consumers with negative ATT and PBC in the presence of NW on processed foods eliminated this type of food from their consumption. On the other hand, those who did not eliminate processed foods with NW from their consumption made that choice because they had a positive PBC. In addition, consumers who were unsure about eliminating or consuming processed foods with NW also had a positive PBC. In addition, SN and sociodemographic variables did not affect consumer choice.

Practical implications

The results of this study are crucial in informing public policy strategies seeking to alert consumers about the content of processed foods, thus raising awareness for decision making in order to reduce noncommunicable diseases associated with poor eating habits.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence on the effect of NWs for processed foods on consumer decisions based on the TPB.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Cristian Adasme-Berríos, Mercedes Sanchez, Marcos Mora, Berta Schnettler, German Lobos and José Díaz

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in consumers’ preferences to food safety label (FSL) on vegetables in central and south central Chile in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in consumers’ preferences to food safety label (FSL) on vegetables in central and south central Chile in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, consumers’ food safety knowledge and frequency of vegetables consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was applied to 1,201 consumers in charge of buying vegetables for their households. The questionnaire measured consumer preference for FSL using tomatoes as a case study.

Findings

The most important attributes for consumers were price (57.3 percent), FSL (19.7 percent), point of sale (11.86 percent) and production system (11.07 percent). Cluster analysis was used to differentiate three types of consumers. The majority (50.5 percent) are consumers oriented to price of tomatoes more than other attributes. A second group (30.1 percent) considers it important to purchase tomatoes at the lowest price with the existence of a FSL. A minority (19.4 percent) was oriented to purchasing tomatoes with a FSL. The groups differ according to sociodemographic characteristics, food safety knowledge and frequency of vegetables consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in country in South America. The results revealed that the majority of consumers choose price over FSL. Nevertheless, a potential market niche was identified that was motivated by FSL as a potential risk-reduction strategy when making choices about fresh vegetables purchase.

Practical implications

FSL is a marketing tool to help the consumers about food decisions.

Social implications

To avoid problems associated to unsafe vegetables, FSL is used as a potential risk-reduction strategy when making choices about fresh vegetables purchase.

Originality/value

The research provides information about a market niche of consumers interested in the existence of an explicit FSL, due to their awareness of the risks associated with the consumption of vegetables. This topic has received little research in Latin American developing countries.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Berta Schnettler, Horacio Miranda, German Lobos, Jose Sepulveda, Ligia Orellana, Marcos Mora and Klaus Grunert

The purpose of this paper is to explore differences in consumers’ willingness to purchase functional foods (FFs) in southern Chile in terms of socio-demographic…

1126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore differences in consumers’ willingness to purchase functional foods (FFs) in southern Chile in terms of socio-demographic characteristics, consumer knowledge, and subjective well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out among 400 people in southern Chile. The questionnaire measured willingness to buy FFs with 18 different benefits, knowledge about FFs, socio-demographic characteristics and satisfaction with life and with food-related life.

Findings

Two dimensions were found for benefits sought in FFs: disease prevention and improvement of bodily functions. Cluster analysis was used to distinguish three types of consumers. The majority (59.8 per cent) showed a significant disposition to buy FFs that prevent diseases or improve bodily functions. Others (25.8 per cent) were less inclined to buy either type of FF. A minority (14.5 per cent) showed greater disposition to buy FFs which improve bodily functions. The types differ according to the size of family, presence and age of children at home, ethnic origin, education, socio-economic status, knowledge about FFs and satisfaction with life and food-related life.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the context of only one country in South America. The results reveal a high interest to buy FFs in order to improve bodily functions, and this preference may be associated to lifestyle changes in the population in Latin American countries.

Originality/value

This study provides information on the willingness to buy FFs and relates it to ethnic origin and satisfaction with food-related life. People from ethnic minorities are less inclined to buy FFs. People who are more inclined to buy FFs are more satisfied with their life and their food-related life.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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