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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Beronda L. Montgomery

To provide an introspective review of one author's account of his first year in a tenure‐track academic career and general recommendations that can be drawn therefrom.

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide an introspective review of one author's account of his first year in a tenure‐track academic career and general recommendations that can be drawn therefrom.

Design/methodology/approach

A critique of the book Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year is presented to assist individuals pursuing or newly engaged in a tenure‐track academic position or to aid those serving as mentors of pre‐tenure faculty members. Areas addressed are balancing professional and personal life domains, teaching, research, service, publishing and tenure.

Findings

A central theme emerges suggesting that more information and formal and informal guidance are needed to assist new faculty members during the transition into academic positions. A number of practical suggestions and resources are provided.

Practical implications

A practical resource for new faculty members and graduate students planning to pursue a position in academia. Also a valuable source for administrators or senior faculty members supervising junior colleagues who have recently obtained a tenure‐track position.

Originality/value

This review identifies and expounds upon salient suggestions provided by author James Lang for surviving the first year of a tenure‐track position.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2023

Becky Wai-Ling Packard, Beronda L. Montgomery and Joi-Lynn Mondisa

The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of multiple campus teams as they engaged in the assessment of their science, technology, engineering and mathematics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of multiple campus teams as they engaged in the assessment of their science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) mentoring ecosystems within a peer assessment dialogue exercise.

Design/methodology/approach

This project utilized a qualitative multicase study method involving six campus teams, drawing upon completed inventory and visual mapping artefacts, session observations and debriefing interviews. The campuses included research universities, small colleges and minority-serving institutions (MSIs) across the United States of America. The authors analysed which features of the peer assessment dialogue exercise scaffolded participants' learning about ecosystem synergies and threats.

Findings

The results illustrated the benefit of instructor modelling, intra-team process time and multiple rounds of peer assessment. Participants gained new insights into their own campuses and an increased sense of possibility by dialoguing with peer campuses.

Research limitations/implications

This project involved teams from a small set of institutions, relying on observational and self-reported debriefing data. Future research could centre perspectives of institutional leaders.

Practical implications

The authors recommend dedicating time to the institutional assessment of mentoring ecosystems. Investing in a campus-wide mentoring infrastructure could align with campus equity goals.

Originality/value

In contrast to studies that have focussed solely on programmatic outcomes of mentoring, this study explored strategies to strengthen institutional mentoring ecosystems in higher education, with a focus on peer assessment, dialogue and learning exercises.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Beronda L. Montgomery

The purpose of this paper is to provide a reflective evaluation of the concept of the teaching commons as presented by authors Huber and Hutchings and to summarize expected

773

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a reflective evaluation of the concept of the teaching commons as presented by authors Huber and Hutchings and to summarize expected outcomes from participation therein.

Design/methodology/approach

An appraisal of the book The Advancement of Learning: Building the Teaching Commons is presented to explore the conception of the teaching commons. This review addresses the definition of the teaching commons and explores the establishment of, and participation in, the teaching commons as a means of advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning and for improving student learning.

Findings

A fundamental premise is developed suggesting that the development and utilization of a teaching commons will improve teaching and learning through the provision of a defined safeplace for conversations about teaching and learning and specific avenues to share information about teaching innovations for improving student learning. Sustained faculty engagement in a teaching commons must be supported by formalized institutional recognition and appropriate rewards.

Practical implications

A practical resource for faculty members involved in the scholarship of teaching and learning and for administrators developing teaching and learning centers or resources for utilization by faculty members.

Originality/value

This review examines the definition and establishment of a teaching commons for improving the scholarship of teaching and learning at the college and university levels.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Content available
110

Abstract

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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