Search results

1 – 10 of 11
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Marimuthu Kannimuthu, Benny Raphael, Ekambaram Palaneeswaran and Ananthanarayanan Kuppuswamy

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to optimize time, cost and quality in a multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to optimize time, cost and quality in a multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach identified the activity execution modes in building construction projects in India to support multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling. The data required to compute time, cost and quality of each activity are compiled from real construction projects. A binary integer-programming model has been developed to perform multi-objective optimization and identify Pareto optimal solutions. The RR-PARETO3 algorithm was used to identify the best compromise trade-off solutions. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated through sample case study projects.

Findings

Results show that good compromise solutions are obtained through multi-objective optimization of time, cost and quality.

Research limitations/implications

Case study data sets were collected only from eight building construction projects in India.

Practical implications

It is feasible to adopt multi-objective optimization in practical construction projects using time, cost and quality as the objectives; Pareto surfaces help to quantify relationships among time, cost and quality. It is shown that cost can be reduced by increasing the duration, and quality can be improved only by increasing the cost.

Originality/value

The use of different activity execution modes compiled from multiple projects in optimization is illustrated, and good compromise solutions for the multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problems using multi-objective optimization are identified.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Marimuthu Kannimuthu, Benny Raphael, Palaneeswaran Ekambaram and Ananthanarayanan Kuppuswamy

Construction firms keep minimal resources to maintain productive working capital. Hence, resources are constrained and have to be shared among multiple projects in an…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction firms keep minimal resources to maintain productive working capital. Hence, resources are constrained and have to be shared among multiple projects in an organization. Optimal allocation of resources is a key challenge in such situations. Several approaches and heuristics have been proposed for this task. The purpose of this paper is to compare two approaches for multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling in a multi-project environment. These are the single-project approach (portfolio optimization) and the multi-project approach (each project is optimized individually, and then heuristic rules are used to satisfy the portfolio constraint).

Design/methodology/approach

A direct search algorithm called Probabilistic Global Search Lausanne is used for schedule optimization. Multiple solutions are generated that achieve different trade-offs among the three criteria, namely, time, cost and quality. Good compromise solutions among these are identified using a multi-criteria decision making method, Relaxed Restricted Pareto Version 4. The solutions obtained using the single-project and multi-project approaches are compared in order to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages. Data from two sources are used for the evaluation: modified multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problem data sets from the project scheduling problem library (PSPLIB) and three real case study projects in India.

Findings

Computational results prove the superiority of the single-project approach over heuristic priority rules (multi-project approach). The single-project approach identifies better solutions compared to the multi-project approach. However, the multi-project approach involves fewer optimization variables and is faster in execution.

Research limitations/implications

It is feasible to adopt the single-project approach in practice; realistic resource constraints can be incorporated in a multi-objective optimization formulation; and good compromise solutions that achieve acceptable trade-offs among the conflicting objectives can be identified.

Originality/value

An integer programming model was developed in this research to optimize the multiple objectives in a multi-project environment considering explicit resource constraints and maximum daily costs constraints. This model was used to compare the performance of the two multi-project environment approaches. Unlike existing work in this area, the model used to predict the quality of activity execution modes is based on data collected from real construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

BENNY RAPHAEL and C.S. KRISHNAMOORTHY

An object oriented finite element model is presented. The main advantage of this model over conventional systems is that, the additional code required for adding elements…

Abstract

An object oriented finite element model is presented. The main advantage of this model over conventional systems is that, the additional code required for adding elements to the finite element library is minimal. The powerful mechanisms provided by object oriented systems facilitate this. These mechanisms enable re‐use of existing code, and allow the programmer to leave certain operations to the computer, which, without object oriented techniques, would not have been possible. In the above model, the finite elements are represented in the form of a hierarchical tree by which it is possible to develop elements by programming only the differences from existing elements. Suitable object oriented designs have been developed for representing mathematical entities like differential operators and shape functions, with a view to automating the process of development of element properties, so that, the element developer needs to specify just the minimum details, leaving most of the operations to the computer. Some of the concepts in object oriented programming are explained in detail, with the examples used in the above model.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2011

Benny Raphael

The purpose of this paper is to improve current design processes by proposing a new approach based on multi‐criteria optimization of the designed asset. Management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve current design processes by proposing a new approach based on multi‐criteria optimization of the designed asset. Management of design in construction projects is a complex task since it involves collaboration between professionals in multiple disciplines. Traditionally, designers work with a single solution at a time which is iteratively modified according to the view points of all the consultants. This results in sub‐optimal solutions. A multi‐criteria approach is able to accommodate diverse view points of specialist consultants in a construction project, aiming at a better optimized building system.

Design/methodology/approach

The shortcomings of current design practices are analyzed based on a literature review. It is found that current approaches involving single objective optimization or Pareto optimization are not adequate for supporting collaborative design processes. A new approach to managing multiple objectives in design is proposed. This involves performing multi‐objective optimization, presenting a population of good solutions to the design consultants and selecting the best solution through an algorithm called RR‐PARETO2 (Relaxed‐Restricted Pareto) filtering. A software tool with a graphical user interface was developed. An example of the design of a building façade is taken to evaluate the application of this approach.

Findings

The paper provides empirical evidence that a multi‐objective optimization approach is able to provide support for the task of accommodating multiple viewpoints in design. The proposed methodology allows navigation through the solution space and pruning it visually by applying constraints. It is shown that the RR‐PARETO2 is able to select a good compromise solution with the best trade‐offs among all the objectives.

Originality/value

The idea of visualizing and filtering a population of design solutions has been proposed by design researchers for a long time, but is not currently adopted in practice in construction projects. The idea of collaborative filtering of the solution space according to the viewpoints of all the consultants by visually applying constraints on design variables and objectives is a new concept, the ultimate aim being a better balanced built asset. This is the first time the RR‐PARETO2 algorithm has been applied to building design.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Low Sui Pheng, Benny Raphael and Wong Kwan Kit

Tsunamis are a rare but devastating form of natural disaster that has been documented since early civilization. Throughout history, many major tsunamis have impacted on…

Downloads
4435

Abstract

Purpose

Tsunamis are a rare but devastating form of natural disaster that has been documented since early civilization. Throughout history, many major tsunamis have impacted on the world's coastlines, causing heavy loss of lives and damage to properties. While the Sumatran tsunami in December 2004 demonstrated the sheer scale of destruction, there remains little understanding of the implications such obliteration have for disaster planning and management in the construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to raise the awareness of these implications and address some of the pertinent issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The threat from tsunamis for an island state like Singapore cannot be ignored. A general study of tsunami dynamics is carried out and applied to model the worst scenario if tsunamis were to hit Singapore. Unique problems relating to such a scenario are subsequently highlighted to extrapolate an understanding of how the construction industry should now react even before the disaster strikes.

Findings

There appear to be some potential danger and immense uncertainties to the immediate coastline of Singapore in the event of a tsunami. Faced with these uncertainties, the local construction industry needs to recognise such challenges and develop appropriate policies and strategies way ahead to account for disaster planning and management.

Practical implications

While tsunami warning systems have been put in place, tsunamis cannot be stopped. The construction industry has a significant role to play in minimising destruction through appropriate building codes, materials, designs, enforcement and preventive maintenance of infrastructure.

Originality/value

The paper raises the issues of disaster planning and management caused by tsunamis and prompts the construction industry into taking appropriate and timely action to ward off what can be an extremely threatening event to both lives and properties.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Raphael Raymond Bar‐On

The increased awareness of the need to preserve and improve the natural and social environment has given rise to many studies and international conferences. Coast cities…

Abstract

The increased awareness of the need to preserve and improve the natural and social environment has given rise to many studies and international conferences. Coast cities are especially vulnerable, since many have to cope with industrial and other pollution from inland as well as their own (which may include smog, e.g. Los Angeles), while their tourism depends on the attractiveness of their beaches (which may be restricted in length and area), water quality etc. Their urban and tourism development may have detracted from their attractiveness. Tourism movement to, in and from them may be highly seasonal, causing congestion and accidents, and entailing the building of accommodation and other services for peak demand. Many once popular resorts have lost much of their past tourism. The urban coastal population is over 800 million, and is forecasted to reach one billion about the year 2000, about 16% of the world's population: over 6 million tons of litter reach the sea each year [Time Magazine June 1, 1992 — based on UNEP and World Resources Inc.].

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

WILLIAM M. EVAN

The purpose of this paper is to design an experimentally‐oriented program for the training of a new generation of educational a administrators. The rationale for the…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to design an experimentally‐oriented program for the training of a new generation of educational a administrators. The rationale for the program is based on selected concepts and propositions of occupational sociology, organization theory, and systems theory. Some of the salient features of the program are as follows: (i) The design is guided by the logic of Campbell's quasi‐experiment. (ii) A principal goal is to stimulate the professionalization of educational administration by increasing (a) the body of systematic knowledge: and (b) the commitment to an ideal of service in education. (iii) Another major goal is to sensitize educational administrators to the dilemmas of organizational change and to strategies for inducing change. (iv) A systems analysis is set forth of five sequentially interrelated processes: goal formation, recruitment of faculty and students, specification of the content of the curriculum, placement of graduates, and an evaluation of the program. (v) A sample curriculum for a three‐year period, guided by six pedagogical conceptions. (vi) A design for an experimental program for four cohorts of students is outlined.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Matthias P Huehn

The purpose of this paper is to hypothesise that business theory and education suffer from having been systematically de-philosophised over the last 200 years. Viewed…

Downloads
1701

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to hypothesise that business theory and education suffer from having been systematically de-philosophised over the last 200 years. Viewed through this lens the economistic narrative can be understood and new and integrated solutions to theoretical and pedagogical problems can be debated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a theoretical exploration based on a literature review and philosophical analysis.

Findings

Going back to a social science philosophy would fundamentally affect how management is conceptualised, done and taught. The paper focuses on outlining the impact a re-philosophisation would have on management education.

Practical implications

If one agrees that philosophy plays a too small role in management, it would change how scholarship is currently defined and how management education functions. Business schools would have to fundamentally change in every respect.

Originality/value

Current criticism of the management mainstream focuses on either the political/ethical or the epistemic level. The paper argues that the epistemic and the ethical are connected and by making an integrated argument the debate can be re-energised and solution strategies become obvious. I am not aware of any other contribution making this argument. Ghoshal (unwittingly) used the same reasoning but without using the clear frame of reference (philosophy) that this paper proposes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Abstract

Details

The Ideological Evolution of Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-389-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1939

ALL who have visited Liverpool for any length of time have affection for her. She lies alongside a noble river, watched over by the lofty Liver building and the perhaps…

Abstract

ALL who have visited Liverpool for any length of time have affection for her. She lies alongside a noble river, watched over by the lofty Liver building and the perhaps more architecturally perfect offices of the Mersey Dock authorities. Even in these days, when the very largest ships have been diverted to Southampton, splendid vessels come from and go to the ends of the earth almost daily. The river is the essential fact about Liverpool; she was born of the river and her waterfront is one of the world's rendezvous. As a city she compares favourably with any English town, and perhaps excels most in her few splendid buildings, amongst which the new and rapidly growing Cathedral takes first rank.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 11