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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Marion A. Weissenberger‐Eibl and Benjamin Teufel

Firms engaged in new product development (NPD) have to achieve a balanced portfolio of NPD projects. Despite the large number of models purporting to support portfolio…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms engaged in new product development (NPD) have to achieve a balanced portfolio of NPD projects. Despite the large number of models purporting to support portfolio optimization, most of them do not take into account political bias in project selection decisions. This paper aims to analyze approaches of organizational politics to NPD project selection and their implications for NPD portfolio management and future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A review is made of the current literature at the intersection between organizational politics and NPD project selection. With regard to the underlying assumptions of organizational politics, similarities, differences, practical implications, and research perspectives are identified.

Findings

From the paper, insights could be gained into explaining the effects of organizational politics on NPD project selection. However, the differences in assumptions that can be generally observed in organizational politics are also reflected in the studies analyzed. Future research could benefit from integrating different political and methodological perspectives.

Practical implications

In order to reach a balanced NPD portfolio, the potentially dysfunctional biases which characterize political processes from idea generation to project selection should be addressed. A concept of NPD portfolio management is proposed which considers the management of power and politics.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a more comprehensive overview of political approaches of NPD project selection and serves as a sound basis for future research. The relevance and implications of politics for NPD portfolio management are demonstrated.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Hany Abdelghaffar and Lobna Samer

The use of information and communication technologies to provide citizens with the opportunity to give the government their feedback on the rules currently under…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of information and communication technologies to provide citizens with the opportunity to give the government their feedback on the rules currently under development is termed as e-rulemaking. Forums – as the main technological tool used for this – has shown many shortcomings and cannot satisfy all the demands of e-rulemaking. Because social networking sites have shown a political impact on ground, they also might have the ability to remedy these shortcomings. This study aims to investigate the possibility of the use of social networking sites in e-rulemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reviews democratic deliberation theory and e-rulemaking in relation with social networks that are used to develop a proposed conceptual model. A combination of qualitative and quantitative research approaches were used to test the proposed model. Semi-structured interviews for mangers and surveys for citizens were used for data collection and then analyzed to draw empirical conclusions.

Findings

Certain variable were found to have a statistically significant impact on the dependent variable of this study. The variables include information collection, user interface, privacy, security and use of emoticons in communications. Through this, the research provides an understanding of the variables that significantly and insignificantly affect the use of social networking sites in e-rulemaking.

Originality/value

This research contributes with a conceptual model that outlines the influence of different variables on e-rulemaking as well as an understanding of how social networking sites could be used to improve e-rulemaking practices and citizen inclusion.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Lars Bækgaard

The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into, and provide practical advice for, event‐based conceptual modeling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into, and provide practical advice for, event‐based conceptual modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes a set of event concepts and uses the results to formulate a conceptual event model that is used to identify guidelines for creation of dynamic process models and static information models.

Findings

The paper characterizes events as short‐duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms of information structures. The conceptual event model is used to characterize a variety of event concepts and it is used to illustrate how events can be used to integrate dynamic modeling of processes and static modeling of information structures.

Originality/value

The results are unique in the sense that no other general event concept has been used to unify a similar broad variety of seemingly incompatible event concepts. The general event concept can be used to improve dynamic and static modeling.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Mónica Izquierdo Alonso and Luis Miguel Moreno Fernández

The aim of this paper is to systemize and improve the scientific status of studies on document abstracting. This is a diachronic, systematic study of document abstracting…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to systemize and improve the scientific status of studies on document abstracting. This is a diachronic, systematic study of document abstracting studies carried out from different perspectives and models (textual, psycholinguistic, social and communicative).

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the perspectives and analysis proposals which are of interest to the various theoreticians of abstracting is carried out using a variety of techniques and approaches (cognitive, linguistic, communicative‐social, didactic, etc.), each with different levels of theoretical and methodological abstraction and degrees of application. The most significant contributions of each are reviewed and highlighted, along with their limitations.

Findings

It is found that the great challenge in abstracting is the systemization of models and conceptual apparatus, which open up this type of research to semiotic and socio‐interactional perspectives. It is necessary to carry out suitable empirical research with operative designs and ad hoc measuring instruments which can measure the efficiency of the abstracting and the efficiency of a good abstract, while at the same time feeding back into the theoretical baggage of this type of study. Such research will have to explain and provide answers to all the elements and variables, which affect the realization and the reception of a quality abstract.

Originality/value

The paper provides a small map of the studies on document abstracting. This shows how the conceptual and methodological framework has extended at the same time as the Science of Documentation has been evolving. All the models analysed – the communicative and interactional approach – are integrated in a new systematic framework.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

S.A. Kokolakis, A.J. Demopoulos and E.A. Kiountouzis

The increasing reliance of organisations on information systems connected to or extending over open data networks has established information security as a critical…

Abstract

The increasing reliance of organisations on information systems connected to or extending over open data networks has established information security as a critical success factor for modern organisations. Risk analysis appears to be the predominant methodology for the introduction of security in information systems (IS). However, risk analysis is based on a very simple model of IS as consisting of assets, mainly data, hardware and software, which are vulnerable to various threats. Thus, risk analysis cannot provide for an understanding of the organisational environment in which IS operate. We believe that a comprehensive methodology for information systems security analysis and design (IS‐SAD) should incorporate both risk analysis and organisational analysis, based on business process modelling (BPM) techniques. This paper examines the possible contribution of BPM techniques to IS‐SAD and identifies the conceptual and methodological requirements for a technique to be used in this context. Based on these requirements, several BPM techniques have been reviewed. The review reveals the need for either adapting and combining current techniques or developing new, specialised ones.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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