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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Gilles E. Gignac, Richard J. Harmer, Sue Jennings and Benjamin R. Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a group of salespeople.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental, repeated measures/between‐groups design was used (training group (n=29) and a control group (n=21)). The dependent variables were sales performance, self‐report EI and rater‐report EI. The data were analysed based on a series of split‐plot ANOVAS.

Findings

Rater‐reported EI correlated with sales performance at r=0.32. The EI training group also demonstrated increases in both self‐ and rater‐report EI equal to approximately a Cohen's d=−0.45, in comparison to the control group. Finally, the EI training group outperformed the control group by approximately 9 per cent (p<0.05) in sales performance.

Research limitations/implications

The long‐term beneficial effects of the EI training program on sales performance are not known.

Practical implications

Human resource practitioners and coaches may consider implementing an EI training program to facilitate performance in sales people.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the effects of an EI training program using a rigorous experimental methodology and an objective measure of sales performance.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Benjamin R. Palmer and Gilles Gignac

The purpose of this paper is to present research on the relationship between the emotional intelligence (EI) of managers and levels of engagement amongst their direct

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research on the relationship between the emotional intelligence (EI) of managers and levels of engagement amongst their direct reports. The findings are discussed in terms of a business case for EI development as a strategy to improve employment brand, talent retention and productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Within three different organisations, employees completed an assessment of their engagement and the EI of their manager via an online web survey system. Correlation analyses were then performed with the data.

Findings

The EI of managers was found to meaningfully correlate with employee engagement scores. A substantial amount of the variability in direct report engagement scores was accounted for by managers' EI.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to establish whether the EI of managers correlates with direct report engagement scores whilst controlling for direct reports' EI. Additionally, whether employee engagement scores improve as a result of improvements in managers' EI needs to be examined.

Practical implications

Organisations may be able to improve their employment brand, talent retention and productivity by developing the EI of management.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to report on the empirical relationship between managers' EI and employee engagement. It will be of interest to those who are challenged with the task of improving leadership and employee engagement more broadly.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Gilles E. Gignac and Benjamin R. Palmer

This paper aims to describe a new measure of employee motivational fit, namely the Genos employee motivation assessment (GEMA), its predictive validity and use in learning

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a new measure of employee motivational fit, namely the Genos employee motivation assessment (GEMA), its predictive validity and use in learning and organizational development activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Within three different organizations, employees completed GEMA via an online web survey system. Correlation analyses were then performed with a series of job performance and employee engagement data.

Findings

Motivational fit (i.e. the degree of alignment between what an individual is motivated by and experiences in their work), within four areas measured by GEMA (namely, role fit, management fit, team fit, and organization fit), were found to be associated with average predictive validity correlation coefficients equal to 0.46, .073, 0.67, and 0.52, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Statistical analyses at the individual level would be beneficial in future research. Additionally, whether motivational fit can be improved via learning and/or organizational development interventions, and whether such improvement leads to corresponding improvements in performance and engagement remains to be determined.

Practical implications

Intervention initiatives designed to improve motivational fit need to be designed and tested. The findings of this study suggest that successful interventions may result in improvements in job performance and employee engagement.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to professionals in recruitment, learning and organizational development interested in the improvement of job performance and employee engagement. This is the first study to examine the validity of GEMA scores and to propose the potential use of motivational fit as an intervention medium to improve these areas.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Holly Raima Hippolite and Toni Bruce

Purpose – This chapter investigates how being Māori influences the sport experiences of Māori participants, and offers a critical Māori perspective on mainstream New…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter investigates how being Māori influences the sport experiences of Māori participants, and offers a critical Māori perspective on mainstream New Zealand sport. It argues for the value of moving towards a culturally competent approach that embraces, rather than resists, Māori tikanga and practices.

Design/methodology/approach – The research is driven by an Indigenous kaupapa Māori research methodology that privileges research by Māori, about Māori, being Māori. Ten highly experienced Māori participants were interviewed. The cultural competence continuum was employed to assess New Zealand sport’s ability to meet the needs of its indigenous peoples.

Findings – For the Māori participants, mainstream sport reflects the echoes of colonial ways of thinking that frequently ignore or devalue Māori values or interpret assertions of self-determination as separatist and divisive. Using examples from the participants’ experiences, we argue that cultural competence is something that could benefit all in New Zealand sport.

Research limitations/implications – The limitations of a small sample are addressed by triangulating the participants’ perspectives with other sources of information about Maori sporting experience.

Originality/value – The chapter privileges a Māori critique of existing structures and suggests a way forward that could positively influence sport delivery for Māori and people of all ethnicities.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1925

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a…

Abstract

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a special article, “Libraries in Birmingham,” by Mr. Walter Powell, Chief Librarian of Birmingham Public Libraries. He has endeavoured to combine in it the subject of Special Library collections, and libraries other than the Municipal Libraries in the City. Another article entitled “Some Memories of Birmingham” is by Mr. Richard W. Mould, Chief Librarian and Curator of Southwark Public Libraries and Cuming Museum. We understand that a very full programme has been arranged for the Conference, and we have already published such details as are now available in our July number.

Details

New Library World, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Ellyn Lyle

Our individual and collective humanness is integral to the pursuit of learning and, thus, has the potential to bring much richness to discussions in teacher education…

Abstract

Our individual and collective humanness is integral to the pursuit of learning and, thus, has the potential to bring much richness to discussions in teacher education. Unfortunately, education continues to prioritize cognitive ways of knowing, often at the expense of affective and spiritual knowledge. Drawing on the work of Parker Palmer (1993, 1997, 1998a, 1998b, 2004, 2017) who advocates for integrated ways of knowing and being and Manulani Meyer (2013) who draws on Indigenous knowledges to suggest holographic epistemology as meaning-making, I embrace a photo-poetic method to challenge the tendency in education to distance our minds from our emotional and ethereal selves. Situated within a/r/tography, this inquiry explores the capacity of artful ways of being to overcome the culture of disconnectedness in education.

Details

Exploring Self Toward Expanding Teaching, Teacher Education and Practitioner Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-262-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you…

Abstract

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you these shortages are very real and quite severe.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Georgios I Zekos

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract…

Abstract

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract either under bills of lading drafted almost totally on the ship owners' terms or not to contract. The conflict between Britain and its rival the American merchant navy precipitated a movement for the use of model contracts of shipment (carriage) and towards standardisation of the liability of International liner carriers by legislative intervention. The bill of lading through its use in international trade gained the characteristic of being the document which incorporates the contractual terms. So, the orally agreed contract of carriage gave way to the contract of carriage in the form of a bill of lading.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Remi Joseph-Salisbury

Abstract

Details

Black Mixed-Race Men
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-531-9

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